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Fortune (magazine)
Fortune is a multinational business magazine, published and owned by Meredith Corporation
Meredith Corporation
and headquartered in New York City. The publication was founded by Henry Luce
Henry Luce
in 1929
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Daniel Okrent
Daniel Okrent (born April 2, 1948) is an American writer and editor. He is best known for having served as the first public editor of The New York Times newspaper, for inventing Rotisserie League Baseball,[1] and for writing several books, such as Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition, which served as a major source for the 2011 Ken Burns/ Lynn Novick
Lynn Novick
miniseries Prohibition. In November 2011, Last Call won the Albert J
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Briton Hadden
Briton Hadden
Briton Hadden
(February 18, 1898 – February 27, 1929) was the co-founder of Time magazine with his Yale classmate Henry Luce. He was Time's first editor and the inventor of its revolutionary writing style, known as Timestyle. Though he died at 31, he was considered one of the most influential journalists of the twenties, a master innovator and stylist, and an iconic figure of the Jazz Age.Contents1 Early life 2 Early career 3 Founding of Time Magazine 4 Illness and death 5 Legacy 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Hadden got his start in newspaper writing at Brooklyn's Poly Prep Country Day School, where he wrote for the school magazine, the Poly Prep, and distributed a hand-written, underground sheet to his classmates that was called The Daily Glonk
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Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
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Ansel Adams
Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black-and-white landscape photographs of the American West, especially Yosemite National Park, have been widely reproduced on calendars, posters, books, and the internet.[1] Adams and Fred Archer developed the Zone System as a way to determine proper exposure and adjust the contrast of the final print. The resulting clarity and depth characterized his photographs
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Human Resources
Human resources are the people who make up the workforce of an organization, business sector, or economy. "Human capital" is sometimes used synonymously with "human resources", although human capital typically refers to a more narrow view (i.e., the knowledge the individuals embody and economic growth)
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Gross Revenue
In accounting, revenue is the income that a business has from its normal business activities, usually from the sale of goods and services to customers. Revenue
Revenue
is also referred to as sales or turnover. Some companies receive revenue from interest, royalties, or other fees.[1] Revenue
Revenue
may refer to business income in general, or it may refer to the amount, in a monetary unit, earned during a period of time, as in "Last year, Company X had revenue of $42 million". Profits or net income generally imply total revenue minus total expenses in a given period. In accounting, in the balance statement it is a subsection of the Equity section and revenue increases equity, it is often referred to as the "top line" due to its position on the income statement at the very top
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Wall Street Crash Of 1929
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29),[1] the Great Crash, or the Stock
Stock
Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the hist
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Editor-in-chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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Alfred Kazin
Alfred Kazin
Alfred Kazin
(June 5, 1915 – June 5, 1998) was an American writer and literary critic, many of whose writings depicted the immigrant experience in early twentieth century America.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Bibliography5.1 Author 5.2 Editor (selected)6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Like many of the other New York Intellectuals, Alfred Kazin
Alfred Kazin
was the son of Jewish immigrants,[1] born in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and a graduate of the City College of New York. However, his politics were more moderate than most of the New York Intellectuals, many of whom were socialists. Career[edit] Kazin was deeply affected by his peers' subsequent disillusion with liberalism
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Bloomberg Businessweek
Bloomberg Businessweek
Bloomberg Businessweek
is an American weekly business magazine published by Bloomberg L.P.
Bloomberg L.P.
Businessweek was founded in 1929. The magazine was created to provide information and interpretation about what was happening in the business world.[2] It is headquartered in New York City. Megan Murphy was appointed editor of the magazine in November 2016.[3] She stepped down from the role in January 2017. Joel Weber was appointed in her place. The magazine is published 47 times a year.Contents1 History1.1 Bloomberg L.P.
Bloomberg L.P.
acquisition2 Recent history 3 Business
Business
school rankings 4 Additional versions 5 Honors and awards 6 Name and spelling history 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Businessweek was first published in September 1929, weeks before the stock market crash of 1929
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Duncan Norton-Taylor
Duncan may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Fruit 4 Music 5 Organizations 6 Schools 7 Ships 8 OtherPeople[edit] Duncan (given name), various people Duncan (surname), various people Clan DuncanPlaces[edit] In Australia:Duncan, South Australia, a locality in the Kangaroo Island Council Hundred of Duncan, a cadastral unit on Kangaroo Island in South AustraliaIn Canada:Duncan, British Columbia
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Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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