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Fort Adams
Fort Adams
Fort Adams
is a former United States Army
United States Army
post in Newport, Rhode Island that was established on July 4, 1799 as a First System coastal fortification, named for President John Adams
John Adams
who was in office at the time. Its first commander was Captain John Henry who was later instrumental in starting the War of 1812
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Charles Sigsbee
Charles Dwight Sigsbee
Charles Dwight Sigsbee
(January 16, 1845 – July 13, 1923) was a Rear Admiral in the United States
United States
Navy. In his earlier career he was a pioneering oceanographer and hydrographer. He is best remembered as the captain of the USS Maine, which exploded in Havana
Havana
harbor, Cuba, in 1898. The explosion set off the events that led up to the start of the Spanish–American War.Contents1 Biography 2 Namesake 3 Dates of Rank 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]The Sigsbee sounding machineSigsbee was born in Albany, New York, and educated at The Albany Academy. He was appointed acting midshipman on 16 July 1862. Sigsbee fought in numerous engagements during the Civil War, mostly against Confederate forts and batteries. Sigsbee served aboard the Monongahela, Wyoming, and Shenandoah from 1863 to 1869, when he was assigned to duty at the Naval Academy
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Redoubt
A redoubt (historically redout)[1][2] is a fort or fort system usually consisting of an enclosed defensive emplacement outside a larger fort, usually relying on earthworks, although some are constructed of stone or brick.[3] It is meant to protect soldiers outside the main defensive line and can be a permanent structure or a hastily constructed temporary fortification. The word means "a place of retreat".[2] Redoubts were a component of the military strategies of most European empires during the colonial era, especially in the outer works of Vauban-style fortresses made popular during the 17th century, although the concept of redoubts has existed since medieval times
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Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
(also known as the Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
National Monument) is a decommissioned military installation in Hampton, Virginia—at Old Point Comfort, the southern tip of the Virginia
Virginia
Peninsula, United States. Along with Fort Wool, Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
guarded the navigation channel between the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
and Hampton Roads—the natural roadstead at the confluence of the Elizabeth, the Nansemond and the James rivers. Surrounded by a moat, the seven-sided star fort is the largest stone fort ever built in the United States. During the initial exploration by the mission headed by Captain Christopher Newport
Christopher Newport
in the earliest days of the Colony of Virginia, the site was identified as a strategic defensive location
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Hampton, Virginia
Hampton is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 137,436.[6] As one of the seven major cities that compose the Hampton Roads metropolitan area, it is on the southeastern end of the Virginia Peninsula. Hampton traces its history to the city's Old Point Comfort, the home of Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
for almost 400 years, which was named by the 1607 voyagers, led by Captain Christopher Newport, who first established Jamestown as an English colonial settlement. Since consolidation in 1952, Hampton has included the former Elizabeth City County
County
and the incorporated town of Phoebus, consolidating by mutual agreement. After the end of the American Civil War, historic Hampton University was established opposite from the town on the Hampton River, providing an education for many newly-freed former slaves and for area Native Americans
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Dry Tortugas
The Dry Tortugas
Dry Tortugas
are a small group of islands, located in the Gulf of Mexico at the end of the Florida
Florida
Keys, United States, about 67 miles (108 km) west of Key West, and 37 miles (60 km) west of the Marquesas Keys, the closest islands. Still farther west is the Tortugas Bank, which is submerged. The first Europeans to discover the islands were the Spanish in 1513, led by explorer Juan Ponce de León. The archipelago's name derives from the lack of fresh water springs, and the presence of turtles
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Florida
Florida
Florida
(/ˈflɒrɪdə/ ( listen); Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States. The state is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida. Florida
Florida
is the 22nd-most extensive (65,755 sq mi—170,304 km2), the 3rd-most populous (20,984,400 inhabitants),[11] and the 8th-most densely populated (384.3/sq mi—121.0/km2) of the U.S. states. Jacksonville is the most populous municipality in the state and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. The Miami metropolitan area is Florida's most populous urban area. Tallahassee is the state's capital. About two-thirds of Florida
Florida
occupies a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean
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Chief Of Engineers
The Chief of Engineers is a principal Army staff officer at The Pentagon. The Chief advises the Army on engineering matters and serves as the Army's topographer and proponent for real estate and other related engineering programs. The Chief of Engineers is the senior service Engineer for the Department of Defense responsible for integrating all aspects of combat, general, and geospatial engineering across the Joint Force. The Chief of Engineers also commands the US Army
US Army
Corps of Engineers. As commander of the US Army
US Army
Corps of Engineers, the Chief of Engineers leads a major Army command that is the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency. This office defines policy and guidance and plans direction for the organizations within the Corps
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Mexican–American War
American victoryTreaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Mexican recognition of U.S. sovereignty over Texas
Texas
(among other territories) End of the conflict between Mexico
Mexico
and Republic of TexasTerritorial changes Mexican CessionBelligerents United States California
California
Republic[1] MexicoCommanders and leaders James K. Polk Winfield Scott Zachary Taylor Stephen W. Kearny John Drake Sloat William Jenkins Worth Robert Field Stockton Joseph Lane Franklin Pierce David Conner Matthew C. Perry John C. Frémont Thomas Childs Henry Stanton Burton William B. Ide Edward Dickinson Baker Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José María Flores Mariano G
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Franklin Pierce
Franklin Pierce
Franklin Pierce
(November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was the 14th President of the United States
President of the United States
(1853–57), a northern Democrat who saw the abolitionist movement as a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation. He alienated anti-slavery groups by championing and signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act
Kansas–Nebraska Act
and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act; yet he failed to stem conflict between North and South, setting the stage for Southern secession and the American Civil War. Pierce was born in New Hampshire, and he served in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate until he resigned from the Senate in 1842. His private law practice in New Hampshire
New Hampshire
was a success, and he was appointed U.S. Attorney for his state in 1845
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Casemate
A casemate, sometimes erroneously rendered casement,[1][2] is a fortified gun emplacement or armored structure from which guns are fired.[3] Originally, the term referred to a vaulted chamber in a fortress
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Western Hemisphere
The Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
is a geographical term[1][2] for the half of Earth
Earth
which lies west of the prime meridian (which crosses Greenwich, London, United Kingdom) and east of the antimeridian
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Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 k
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Annapolis
Annapolis (/əˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, as well as the county seat of Anne Arundel
Anne Arundel
County. Situated on the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
at the mouth of the Severn River, 25 miles (40 km) south of Baltimore
Baltimore
and about 30 miles (50 km) east of Washington, D.C., Annapolis is part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area. Its population was measured at 38,394 by the 2010 census. The city served as the seat of the Confederation Congress
Confederation Congress
(former Second Continental Congress) and temporary national capital of the United States
United States
in 1783–1784. At that time, General George Washington came before the body convened in the new Maryland
Maryland
State House and resigned his commission as commander of the Continental Army
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