HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Formalism (art)
In art history, formalism is the study of art by analyzing and comparing form and style—the way objects are made and their purely visual aspects. In painting, formalism emphasizes compositional elements such as color, line, shape, texture, and other perceptual aspects rather than iconography or the historical and social context. At its extreme, formalism in art history posits that everything necessary to comprehending a work of art is contained within the work of art
[...More...]

picture info

Josef Albers
Josef Albers
Josef Albers
(/ˈælbərz, ˈɑːl-/; German: [ˈalbɐs]; March 19, 1888 – March 25, 1976)[1] was a German-born American artist and educator whose work, both in Europe and in the United States, formed the basis of modern art education programs of the twentieth century.Contents1 Life and work1.1 Homage to the Square 1.2 Murals2 Style and influences 3 Exhibitions 4 Legacy 5 Criticism 6 Value on the art market 7 See also7.1 Noted students of Albers8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksLife and work[edit] Albers was born into a Roman Catholic family of craftsmen in Bottrop, Westphalia, Germany.[2] He worked from 1908 to 1913 as a schoolteacher in his home town; he also trained as an art teacher at Königliche Kunstschule in Berlin, Germany, from 1913 to 1915
[...More...]

picture info

Post-Modernism
Postmodernism
Postmodernism
is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.[1][2][3] The term has also more generally been applied to the historical era following modernity, and the tendencies of this era.[4] While encompassing a disparate variety of approaches, postmodernism is typically defined by an attitude of skepticism, irony, or rejection toward the meta-narratives and ideologies of modernism, and often calls into question various assumptions of Enlightenment
[...More...]

Internet Encyclopedia Of Philosophy
The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Philosophy
(IEP) is a scholarly online encyclopedia, dealing with philosophy, philosophical topics, and philosophers.[1] The IEP combines open access publication with peer reviewed publication of original papers
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Composition (art)
In the visual arts, composition is the placement or arrangement of visual elements or 'ingredients' in a work of art, as distinct from the subject. It can also be thought of as the organization of the elements of art according to the principles of art. The composition of a picture is different from its subject, what is depicted, whether a moment from a story, a person or a place. Many subjects, for example Saint George and the Dragon, are often portrayed in art, but using a great range of compositions even though the two figures are typically the only ones shown. The term composition means 'putting together' and can apply to any work of art, from music to writing to photography, that is arranged using conscious thought. In the visual arts, composition is often used interchangeably with various terms such as design, form, visual ordering, or formal structure, depending on the context
[...More...]

picture info

Iconography
Iconography, as a branch of art history, studies the identification, description, and the interpretation of the content of images: the subjects depicted, the particular compositions and details used to do so, and other elements that are distinct from artistic style. The word iconography comes from the Greek εἰκών ("image") and γράφειν ("to write"). A secondary meaning (based on a non-standard translation of the Greek and Russian equivalent terms) is the production of religious images, called "icons", in the Byzantine and Orthodox Christian tradition; see Icon. In art history, "an iconography" may also mean a particular depiction of a subject in terms of the content of the image, such as the number of figures used, their placing and gestures. The term is also used in many academic fields other than art history, for example semiotics and media studies, and in general usage, for the content of images, the typical depiction in images of a subject, and related senses
[...More...]

picture info

Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
is the process of breaking a complex topic or substance into smaller parts in order to gain a better understanding of it. The technique has been applied in the study of mathematics and logic since before Aristotle
Aristotle
(384–322 B.C.), though analysis as a formal concept is a relatively recent development.[1] The word comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἀνάλυσις (analysis, "a breaking up", from ana- "up, throughout" and lysis "a loosening").[2] As a formal concept, the method has variously been ascribed to Alhazen,[3] René Descartes
René Descartes
(Discourse on the Method), and Galileo Galilei
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Abstract Expressionism
Abstract expressionism
Abstract expressionism
is a post– World War II
World War II
art movement in American painting, developed in New York in the 1940s.[1] It was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence and put New York City
New York City
at the center of the western art world, a role formerly filled by Paris. Although the term abstract expressionism was first applied to American art in 1946 by the art critic Robert Coates, it had been first used in Germany in 1919 in the magazine Der Sturm, regarding German Expressionism
[...More...]

picture info

Op Art
Op art, short for optical art, is a style of visual art that uses optical illusions.[1] Op art
Op art
works are abstract, with many better known pieces created in black and white. Typically, they give the viewer the impression of movement, hidden images, flashing and vibrating patterns, or of swelling or warping.Contents1 History1.1 The Responsive Eye2 Method of operation2.1 Black-and-white
Black-and-white
and the figure-ground relationship 2.2 Color2.2.1 Color interaction3 Exhibitions 4 Photographic op art 5 Other artists known for their op art 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksHistory[edit]Francis Picabia, c. 1921–22, Optophone I, encre, aquarelle et mine de plomb sur papier, 72 × 60 cm
[...More...]

picture info

Color Field Painting
Color
Color
Field painting is a style of abstract painting that emerged in New York City
New York City
during the 1940s and 1950s. It was inspired by European modernism and closely related to Abstract Expressionism, while many of its notable early proponents were among the pioneering Abstract Expressionists. Color
Color
Field is characterized primarily by large fields of flat, solid color spread across or stained into the canvas creating areas of unbroken surface and a flat picture plane. The movement places less emphasis on gesture, brushstrokes and action in favour of an overall consistency of form and process
[...More...]

picture info

Style (visual Arts)
In the visual arts, style is a "...distinctive manner which permits the grouping of works into related categories"[1] or "...any distinctive, and therefore recognizable, way in which an act is performed or an artifact made or ought to be performed and made".[2] It refers to the visual appearance of a work of art that relates it to other works by the same artist or one from the same period, training, location, "school", art movement or archaeological culture: "The notion of style has long been the art historian's principal mode of classifying works of art. By style he selects and shapes the history of art".[3] Style is often divided into the general style of a period, country or cultural group, group of artists or art movement, and the individual style of the artist within that group style
[...More...]

picture info

Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
(/kænt/;[8] German: [ɪˈmaːnu̯eːl kant]; 22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is a central figure in modern philosophy.[9] Kant argues that the human mind creates the structure of human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of human sensibility, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is independent of humanity's concepts of it. Kant took himself to have effected a "Copernican revolution" in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolves around the earth
[...More...]

Elements Of Art
A work of art can be analyzed by considering a variety of aspects of it individually. These aspects are often called the elements of art. A commonly used list of the main elements include form, shape, line, color, value, space and texture.Contents1 Form 2 Line 3 Color 4 Space 5 Texture 6 Value 7 Shape 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksForm[edit] The form of a work is its shape, including its volume or perceived volume. A three-dimensional artwork has depth as well as width and height. Three-dimensional form is the basis of sculpture.[1] However, two-dimensional artwork can achieve the illusion of form with the use of perspective and/or shading or modelling techniques.[2][3] Formalism is the analysis of works by their form or shapes in art history or archeology. Line[edit] Lines and curves are marks that span a distance between two points (or the path of a moving point)
[...More...]

picture info

Geometric Abstraction
Geometric abstraction
Geometric abstraction
is a form of abstract art based on the use of geometric forms sometimes, though not always, placed in non-illusionistic space and combined into non-objective (non-representational) compositions. Although the genre was popularized by avant-garde artists in the early twentieth century, similar motifs have been used in art since ancient times.Contents1 History 2 Scholarly analysis 3 Relationship with music 4 Selected artists 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Geometric abstraction
Geometric abstraction
is present among many cultures throughout history both as decorative motifs and as art pieces themselves. Islamic art, in its prohibition of depicting religious figures, is a prime example of this geometric pattern-based art, which existed centuries before the movement in Europe and in many ways influenced this Western school
[...More...]

.