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Forde Abbey
Forde Abbey
Forde Abbey
is a privately owned former Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery in Dorset, England, with a postal address in Chard, Somerset. The house and gardens are run as a tourist attraction while the 1,600-acre (650 ha) estate is farmed to provide additional revenue. Forde Abbey is a Grade I listed building.Contents1 History 2 House and gardens 3 Other burials at Forde Abbey 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit]Plan of the Abbey and its surroundings (1911)Between 1133-36, wealthy nobleman Richard de Brioniis built a priory on his land at Brightley (meaning "bright" or "clear" pasture) and invited Gilbert, Abbot of Waverley in Surrey, to send 12 monks to form a new Cistercian
Cistercian
community there. One story is that the agricultural land surrounding the new priory was insufficiently fertile, forcing the monks to consider returning to the mother house in 1141
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Cistercian
A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (/sɪˈstɜːrʃən/,[1] abbreviated as OCist or SOCist (Latin: (Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), a religious order of monks and nuns. They are variously called the Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Bernard of Clairvaux
(though the term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland
Poland
and Lithuania), or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians
Cistercians
over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine
Benedictine
monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales
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Interregnum (England)
The Interregnum was the period between the execution of Charles I on 30 January 1649 and the arrival of his son Charles II in London on 29 May 1660 which marked the start of the Restoration. During the Interregnum England was under various forms of republican government (see Commonwealth of England; this article describes other facets of the Interregnum).Contents1 Politics 2 Life during the Interregnum 3 Jews in England 4 Radicals vs conservatives4.1 Levellers 4.2 Diggers 4.3 Religious sects 4.4 Conservatives5 Historical analysis 6 Notes 7 ReferencesPolitics[edit] Main article: Commonwealth of England The politics of the period were dominated by the wishes of the Grandees (Senior Officers) of the New Model Army
New Model Army
and their civilian supporters
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Hinton St George
Hinton St George
Hinton St George
is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated 3 miles (4.8 km) outside Crewkerne, 10 miles (16.1 km) south west of Yeovil
Yeovil
in the South Somerset
Somerset
district. The village has a population of 442.[1] It has a wide main street lined with hamstone cottages, some thatched. The village has a thriving shop. The village does not lie on a major road, and has a few holiday cottages and second homes.Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Church 4 Culture 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]The village crossThe parish was part of the hundred of Crewkerne.[2][3] Much of the development of the village occurred under the lords Poulett extending their large house and estate (Hinton House). By the 1560s the three open arable fields had been enclosed and two large estates of 74 and 68 acres (280,000 m2) created, based on the now disappeared hamlet of Craft
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Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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Solicitor General For England And Wales
Her Majesty's Solicitor General for England and Wales, known informally as the Solicitor General, is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General, whose duty is to advise the Crown and Cabinet on the law. He or she can exercise the powers of the Attorney General in the Attorney General's absence. There is also a Solicitor General for Scotland, who is the deputy of the Lord Advocate. As well as the Sovereign's Solicitor General, the Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
and a Queen consort
Queen consort
(when the Sovereign is male) are also entitled to have an Attorney and Solicitor General, though the present Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
has only an Attorney General and no Solicitor General. The Solicitor General is addressed in court as "Mr Solicitor" or ''Ms Solicitor''. Despite the title, the position is usually held by a barrister
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Lyme Regis
Lyme Regis
Lyme Regis
/ˌlaɪmˈriːdʒɪs/ is a town in West Dorset, England, 25 miles (40 km) west of Dorchester and 25 miles (40 km) east of Exeter. It lies at Lyme Bay
Lyme Bay
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast at the Dorset– Devon
Devon
border. It is nicknamed "The Pearl of Dorset". It is noted for fossils found in cliffs and beaches that are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic
Jurassic
Coast—a World Heritage Site. The harbour wall known as "The Cobb" appears in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion, in the John Fowles
John Fowles
novel The French Lieutenant's Woman, and in the 1981 film of the same name, which was partly shot in Lyme Regis. Its one-time mayor and MP was Admiral Sir George Somers, who founded the English colonial settlement of the Somers Isles, now known as Bermuda
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Inner Temple
The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court
Inns of Court
(professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London. The Inn is a professional body that provides legal training, selection, and regulation for members. It is ruled by a governing council called "Parliament", made up of the Masters of the Bench (or "Benchers"), and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Temple takes its name from the Knights Templar, who originally leased the land to the Temple's inhabitants (Templars) until their abolition in 1312
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English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
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Attorney-General
In most common law jurisdictions, the attorney general (sometimes abbreviated as AG) or attorney-general (plural: attorneys general (traditional) or attorney generals)[1][2][3] is the main legal advisor to the government, and in some jurisdictions, they may also have executive responsibility for law enforcement, prosecutions or even responsibility for legal affairs generally
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Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
(/ˈbɛnθəm/; 15 February 1748 [O.S. 4 February 1747][1] – 6 June 1832) was an English philosopher, jurist, and social reformer regarded as the founder of modern utilitarianism.[2][3] Bentham defined as the "fundamental axiom" of his philosophy the principle that "it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong".[4][5] He became a leading theorist in Anglo-American philosophy of law, and a political radical whose ideas influenced the development of welfarism
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Cloister
A cloister (from Latin
Latin
claustrum, "enclosure") is a covered walk, open gallery, or open arcade running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth
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Chapter House
A chapter house or chapterhouse is a building or room that is part of a cathedral, monastery or collegiate church in which larger meetings are held. When attached to a cathedral, the cathedral chapter meets there. In monasteries, the whole community often met there on a daily basis for readings and to hear the abbot or senior monks talk. When attached to a collegiate church, the dean, prebendaries and canons of the college meet there. The rooms may also be used for other meetings of various sorts; in medieval times monarchs on tour in their territory would often take them over for their meetings and audiences. Synods, ecclesiastical courts and similar meetings often took place in chapter houses.Contents1 Design 2 History and uses 3 Examples 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] When part of a monastery, the chapter house is generally located on the eastern wing of the cloister, which is next to the church
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Register Of Historic Parks And Gardens Of Special Historic Interest In England
The Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special
Special
Historic Interest in England provides a listing and classification system for historic parks and gardens similar to that used for listed buildings. The register is managed by Historic England
Historic England
under the provisions of the National Heritage Act 1983.[1] Over 1,600 sites are listed, ranging from the grounds of large stately homes to small domestic gardens, as well other designed landscapes such as town squares, public parks and cemeteries.[2]Contents1 Purpose 2 Register 3 Eligibility 4 Other parts of the United Kingdom 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPurpose[edit] The register aims to "celebrate designed landscapes of note, and encourage appropriate protection",[2] so safeguarding the features and qualities of key landscapes for the future
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