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Ford Frick
FORD CHRISTOPHER FRICK (December 19, 1894 – April 8, 1978) was an American sportswriter and baseball executive. After working as a teacher and as a sportswriter for the New York American , he served as public relations director of the National League
National League
(NL), then as the league's president from 1934 to 1951 . He was the third Commissioner of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) from 1951 to 1965 . While Frick was NL president, he had a major role in the establishment of the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
as a museum that honors the best players in baseball history. He extinguished threats of a player strike in response to the racial integration of the major leagues. During Frick's term as commissioner, expansion occurred and MLB faced the threat of having its antitrust exemption revoked by Congress. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
in 1970. The Ford C. Frick Award recognizes outstanding MLB broadcasters. CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 NL President * 3 Baseball Commissioner * 4 Personal * 5 Later life * 6 Legacy * 7 References * 8 External links EARLY LIFEFrick was born on a farm in Wawaka, Indiana , and went to high school in Rome City, Indiana
Indiana

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1937 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
The 1937 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME was the fifth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball . The game was held on July 7, 1937, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., the home of the Washington Senators of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 8–3. The game, watched by President
President
Franklin D. Roosevelt , is remembered because of a play in which Earl Averill of the Indians hit a ball that struck pitcher Dizzy Dean on the toe, breaking it. Complications of this injury shortened the career of the future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher. CONTENTS* 1 Rosters * 1.1 National League * 1.2 American League * 2 Game * 2.1 Umpires * 2.2 Starting lineups * 2.3 Game summary * 3 References * 4 External links ROSTERSPlayers in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame
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Commissioner Of Baseball
The COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL is the chief executive of Major League Baseball (MLB) and the associated Minor League Baseball (MiLB) – a constellation of leagues and clubs known as ORGANIZED BASEBALL. Under the direction of the Commissioner, the Office of the Commissioner of Baseball hires and maintains the sport's umpiring crews, and negotiates marketing , labor, and television contracts . The commissioner is chosen by a vote of the owners of the teams. The current commissioner is Rob Manfred , who assumed office on January 25, 2015. CONTENTS * 1 Origin of the office * 2 Overview of commissioners * 2.1 Kenesaw Mountain Landis (1920–1944) * 2.1.1 Gambling * 2.1.2 A fiercely independent Commissioner\'s Office * 2.1.3 The baseball color line * 2.1.4 Curbing the growth of minor league farm systems * 2.1.5 Legacy and honors * 2.2 Happy Chandler (1945–1951) * 2.3 Ford Frick (1951–1965) * 2.4 William Eckert (1965–1968) * 2.5 Bowie Kuhn (1969–1984) * 2.5.1 Curt Flood * 2.5.2 Charles O. Finley * 2.5.3 Kuhn\'s war on drugs * 2.5.4 Leaving office * 2.6 Peter Ueberroth (1984–1989) * 2.7 A
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Happy Chandler
ALBERT BENJAMIN "HAPPY" CHANDLER, SR. (July 14, 1898 – June 15, 1991) was an American politician from the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky
Kentucky
. He represented the Commonwealth in the U.S. Senate and served as its 44th and 49th governor . Aside from his political positions, he also served as the second Commissioner of Baseball from 1945 to 1951 and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
in 1982. His grandson, Ben Chandler , later served as congressman for Kentucky\'s Sixth District . A multi-sport athlete during his college days at Transylvania College , Chandler briefly considered a career in professional baseball before deciding to pursue a law degree. After graduation, he entered politics and was elected as a Democrat to the Kentucky
Kentucky
Senate in 1928. Two years later, he was elected lieutenant governor , serving under Governor Ruby Laffoon . Chandler and Laffoon disagreed on the issue of instituting a state sales tax and when Chandler, the presiding officer in the state senate, worked to block the legislation, Laffoon's allies in the General Assembly stripped him of many of his statutory powers. The tax then passed by a narrow margin
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William Eckert
WILLIAM DOLE "SPIKE" ECKERT (January 20, 1909 – April 16, 1971) was a lieutenant general in the United States
United States
Air Force , and later the fourth Commissioner of Major League Baseball from 1965 to 1968 . CONTENTS* 1 Biography * 1.1 Before baseball * 1.2 Tenure as Commissioner of Major League Baseball * 1.3 Death * 2 References * 3 External links BIOGRAPHYBEFORE BASEBALL William Eckert
William Eckert
was born on January 20, 1909 in Freeport, Illinois
Freeport, Illinois
. Eckert, who grew up in Madison, Indiana , graduated from the United States Military Academy in June 1930. It was there that Eckert earned the nickname "Spike" while playing football. He then attended the Air Corps Flying Schools at Brooks and Kelly Fields in San Antonio, Texas , graduating in October 1931. In 1938, he was selected as one of two officers for advanced education at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration and graduated with a master's degree in June 1940. In 1957, at the age of 48, Eckert was commissioned lieutenant general, making him the youngest three-star officer in the United States Armed Forces . When he retired, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal
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List Of National League Presidents
This is a LIST OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PRESIDENTS. CONTENTS* 1 National League
National League
presidents * 1.1 Honorary president * 1.2 See also * 2 References NATIONAL LEAGUE PRESIDENTS Morgan Bulkeley
Morgan Bulkeley
, the first president of the National League
National League
Key Member of the Baseball Hall of Fame NAME YEAR(S) REF(S) BULKELEY, MORGANMORGAN BULKELEY 1876 HULBERT, WILLIAMWILLIAM HULBERT 1877–1882 SODEN, ARTHURARTHUR SODEN 1882 MILLS, ABRAHAM G.ABRAHAM G. MILLS 1883–1884 YOUNG, NICHOLASNICHOLAS YOUNG 1885–1902 PULLIAM, HARRYHARRY PULLIAM 1903–1909 HEYDLER, JOHNJOHN HEYDLER 1909 LYNCH, THOMASTHOMAS LYNCH 1910–1913 TENER, JOHN K.JOHN K. TENER 1913–1918 HEYDLER, JOHNJOHN HEYDLER 1918–1934 FRICK, FORDFORD FRICK 1934–1951 GILES, WARRENWARREN GILES 1951–1969 FEENEY, CHUBCHUB FEENEY 1970–1986 GIAMATTI, A. BARTLETTA. BARTLETT GIAMATTI 1986–1989 WHITE, BILLBILL WHITE 1989–1994 COLEMAN, JR., LEONARD S.LEONARD S. COLEMAN, JR. 1994–1999HONORARY PRESIDENTFollowing the 1999 season, the American and National Leagues were merged with Major League Baseball, and the leagues ceased to exist as business entities. The role of the league president was eliminated
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John Heydler
JOHN ARNOLD HEYDLER (July 10, 1869 – April 18, 1956) was an American executive in Major League Baseball . After working as a National League (NL) umpire , he was the secretary to the NL president and then became the secretary-treasurer of the NL before assuming the NL presidency himself. Heydler made early contributions to baseball recordkeeping and statistics. BIOGRAPHYBorn in La Fargeville, New York , Heydler was a printer's apprentice as a young man, and he eventually worked at the U.S. Government Printing Office . Heydler was an umpire (baseball) in the NL from 1895 to 1897, and then became a sportswriter. In 1903 he was hired as the private secretary to NL president Harry Pulliam , principally working to compile league playing statistics, a duty of every baseball league office. Heydler's work caused him to record much of the league's early history, and he became an advocate for new ways to measure player accomplishments; for example, he was a strong supporter of recording runs batted in for batters and he began computing earned run averages for pitchers. On becoming the NL's secretary-treasurer from 1907 to 1918, he served as the league president briefly after Pulliam's suicide in 1909
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Warren Giles
WARREN CRANDALL GILES (May 28, 1896 – February 7, 1979) was an American professional baseball executive. He spent 33 years in high-level posts in Major League Baseball , as club president and general manager of the Cincinnati Reds (1937–51) and president of the National League (1951–69), and was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame . Born in Tiskilwa, Illinois , Giles attended Washington 1977–88). During the early weeks of the 1963 season, Giles became a figure of some controversy after he instructed the NL's umpires to strictly enforce the balk rule then in place. In response, the Senior Circuit's arbiters called 74 balks from the opening of the season on April 8 until April 26, when Giles announced a relaxation of the policy. Only two balks were called in the American League over the same period. Giles, then 73, announced his intention to retire after the 1969 season and on December 5, Giants' executive Chub Feeney was elected to succeed him. Under Feeney, league president through 1986 , the NL's All-Star Game dominance would continue, with 14 triumphs in 17 games
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Wawaka, Indiana
WAWAKA is an unincorporated community in Elkhart Township , Noble County , in the U.S. state of Indiana
Indiana
. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Notable people * 4 References HISTORYWawaka was founded in 1857. The name Wawaka is said to be of Native American origin, meaning "big heron". A post office has been in operation at Wawaka since 1857. GEOGRAPHYWawaka is located at 41°27′25″N 85°28′56″W / 41.45694°N 85.48222°W / 41.45694; -85.48222 . NOTABLE PEOPLE * Ford Frick
Ford Frick
, sportswriterREFERENCES * ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States
United States
Geological Survey . 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. * ^ "American FactFinder". United States
United States
Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31. * ^ "Wawaka, Indiana". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved July 16, 2017. * ^ Baker, Ronald L. (October 1995). From Needmore to Prosperity: Hoosier Place Names in Folklore and History. Indiana
Indiana
University Press. p. 340. ISBN 978-0-253-32866-3 . This village was laid out in February 1857... * ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Placenames of the United States. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 557. ISBN 978-0-8061-3598-4 . * ^ "Noble County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 13 September 2015
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Indiana
INDIANA /ɪndiˈænə/ ( listen ) is a U.S. state located in the midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America. Indiana is the 38th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States . Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis . Indiana was admitted to the United States as the 19th U.S. state on December 11, 1816. Indiana borders Lake Michigan to the northwest, Michigan to the north, Ohio to the east, Kentucky to the south and southeast, and Illinois to the west. Before becoming a territory, varying cultures of indigenous peoples and historic Native Americans inhabited Indiana for thousands of years. Since its founding as a territory, settlement patterns in Indiana have reflected regional cultural segmentation present in the Eastern United States; the state's northernmost tier was settled primarily by people from New England and New York, Central Indiana by migrants from the Mid-Atlantic states and from adjacent Ohio, and Southern Indiana by settlers from the Southern states, particularly Kentucky and Tennessee. Indiana has a diverse economy with a gross state product of $298 billion in 2012
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Bronxville, New York
BRONXVILLE /ˈbrɒŋksvɪl/ is a village in Westchester County , New York , located about 15 miles (24 km) north of midtown Manhattan
Manhattan
. It is part of the town of Eastchester . The village comprises 1 square mile (2.5 km2) of land in its entirety, approximately 20% of the town of Eastchester. As of the 2010 U.S. census , Bronxville had a population of 6,323. As of 2016, Bronxville was rated the number one most expensive suburb around America's ten largest cities by CNBC with a median home value of $2.33 million. It is currently ranked 8th in Bloomberg's "America's 100 Richest Places". CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Demographics * 3 Postal code * 4 Education * 5 Parks and recreation * 6 Notable people * 7 In popular culture * 8 Image gallery * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links HISTORYMillionaire real-estate and pharmaceutical mogul William Van Duzer Lawrence sparked the development of Bronxville as an affluent suburb of New York City
New York City
with magnificent homes in a country-like setting. The area, once known as "Underhill's Crossing", became "Bronxville" when the village was formally established. The population grew in the second half of the 19th century when railroads allowed commuters from Westchester County to work in New York City
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New York (state)
NEW YORK is a state in the northeastern United States
United States
. New York
New York
was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States
United States
. With an estimated 19.8 million residents in 2015, it is the fourth-most-populous state in the United States. The state's largest city, New York City
New York City
, makes up over 40% of the population of New York
New York
State. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area , and nearly 40% lives on Long Island . The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York , future King James II of England . With an estimated population of 8.55 million in 2015, New York City
New York City
is the most populous city in the United States
United States
and the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States
United States
. The New York
New York
Metropolitan Area is one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. New York City
City
is a global city , home to the United Nations Headquarters and has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city
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Alma Mater
ALMA MATER ( Latin : _alma_ "nourishing/kind", _mater_ "mother"; pl. _almae matres_) is an allegorical Latin phrase for a university or college . In modern usage, it is a school or university which an individual has attended, or a song or hymn associated with a school . The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students. Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its modern usage, _Alma mater_ was an honorific title for various Latin mother goddesses , especially Ceres or Cybele , and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary . It entered academic usage when the University of Bologna adopted the motto "_Alma Mater Studiorum_" ("nurturing mother of studies"), which describes its heritage as the oldest operating university in the Western world . It is related to _alumnus _, a term used for a university graduate that literally means a "nursling" or "one who is nourished"
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DePauw University
DEPAUW UNIVERSITY in Greencastle, Indiana
Greencastle, Indiana
, is a private liberal arts college with an enrollment of approximately 2,300 students. The school has a Methodist
Methodist
heritage and was originally known as INDIANA ASBURY UNIVERSITY. DePauw is a member of both the Great Lakes Colleges Association and the North Coast Athletic Conference . The Society of Professional Journalists was founded at DePauw
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United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America _ Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos _ * " E pluribus unum " ( Latin
Latin
) (de facto) "Out of many, one" * " Annuit c
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Sportswriter
SPORTS JOURNALISM is a form of writing that reports on sporting topics and competitions . Sports journalism is the essential element of many news media organizations. While the sports department within some newspapers has been mockingly called the toy department, because sports journalists do not concern themselves with the 'serious' topics covered by the news desk, sports coverage has grown in importance as sport has grown in wealth , power , and influence . Also, some media organizations are devoted entirely to sports reporting — newspapers and magazines such as L\'Equipe in France
France
, La Gazzetta dello Sport
Sport
in Italy
Italy
, Marca in Spain
Spain
, the defunct Sporting Life in Britain, and American Sports Illustrated and Sporting News
News
; television networks such as Eurosport , Fox Sports , ESPN ; sports radio stations such as BBC Radio 5 Live , ESPN Radio , Fox Sports Radio and TSN Radio
TSN Radio
; and The Sports Network (TSN) ; and websites such as ESPN.com , Foxsports.com , and Yahoo! Sports
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