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Footfall
Footfall
Footfall
is a 1985 science fiction novel by American writers Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. The book depicts the arrival of members of an alien species called the Fithp that have traveled to our solar system from Alpha Centauri
Alpha Centauri
in a large spacecraft driven by a Bussard ramjet. Their intent is conquest of the planet Earth.Contents1 Plot 2 Timeline 3 Reception 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] The alien Fithp resemble baby elephants with multiple prehensile trunks. They possess more advanced technology than humans, but have developed none of it on their own. In the distant past on their planet, another species was dominant. This predecessor species badly damaged the environment, rendering themselves and many other species extinct, but left behind their knowledge inscribed on large stone cubes, from which the Fithp have gained their technology
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Nuclear Pulse Propulsion
Nuclear pulse propulsion
Nuclear pulse propulsion
or external pulsed plasma propulsion, is a hypothetical method of spacecraft propulsion that uses nuclear explosions for thrust.[1] It was first developed as Project Orion by DARPA, after a suggestion by Stanislaw Ulam
Stanislaw Ulam
in 1947.[2] Newer designs using inertial confinement fusion have been the baseline for most post-Orion designs, including Project Daedalus
Project Daedalus
and Project Longshot.Contents1 Project Orion 2 Project Daedalus 3 Medusa 4 Project Longshot 5 Antimatter-catalyzed nuclear pulse propulsion 6 MSNW magneto-inertial fusion driven rocket 7 See also 8 References 9 External referencesProject Orion[edit] Main article: Project Orion (nuclear propulsion)A nuclear pulse propulsion unit. The explosive charge ablatively vaporizes the propellant, propelling it away from the charge, and simultaneously creating a plasma out of the propellant
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National Security Advisor (United States)
The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (APNSA), commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor (NSA) or at times informally termed the NSC Advisor,[1][2] is a senior aide in the Executive Office of the President, based at the West Wing
West Wing
of the White House, who serves as the chief in-house advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. The National Security Advisor is appointed by the President and does not require confirmation by the Senate,[3] but an appointment of a three or four-star general to the role requires Senate reconfirmation of military rank.[4] The National Security Advisor participates in meetings of the National Security Council (NSC) and usually chairs meetings of the Principals Committee of the NSC with the Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense (the meetings not attended by the President)
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Nuclear Warfare
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear warfare
(sometimes atomic warfare or thermonuclear warfare) is a military conflict or political strategy in which nuclear weaponry is used to inflict damage on the enemy. Nuclear weapons are weapons of mass destruction; in contrast to conventional warfare, nuclear warfare can produce destruction in a much shorter time and can have a long-lasting radiological warfare result
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Indian Ocean
The Indian Ocean
Ocean
is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering 70,560,000 km2 (27,240,000 sq mi) (approximately 20% of the water on the Earth's surface).[1] It is bounded by Asia
Asia
on the north, on the west by Africa, on the east by Australia, a
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Neutron Star (short Story Collection)
5000000000000000000♠0 e 3021799999999999999♠(−2±8)×10−22 e (experimental limits)[4]Electric dipole moment < 6974290000000000000♠2.9×10−26 e⋅cm (experimental upper limit)Electric polarizability 6997116000000000000♠1.16(15)×10−3 fm3Magnetic moment 3026033763500000000♠−0.96623650(23)×10−26 J·T−1[3] 3002895812437000000♠−1.04187563(25)×10−3 μB[3] 2999808695726999999♠−1.91304273(45) μN[3]Magnetic polarizability 6996370000000000000♠3.7(20)×10−4 fm3Spin 1/2Isospin −1/2Parity +1Condensed I(JP) = 1/2(1/2+)The neutron is a subatomic particle, symbol n or n0, with no net electric charge and a mass slightly larger than that of a proton. Protons and neutrons constitute the nuclei of atoms
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Michael (archangel)
Michael (Hebrew pronunciation: [mixaˈʔel]; Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל‎, translit. Mîkhā'ēl, lit. 'Who is like God?'; Greek: Μιχαήλ, translit. Mikhaḗl; Latin: Michahel;Coptic: ⲙⲓⲭⲁⲏⲗ, Arabic: ميخائيل‎, translit. Mīkhā'īl) is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran traditions, he is called " Saint
Saint
Michael the Archangel" and "Saint Michael". In the Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
and Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
traditions, he is called " Taxiarch Archangel
Archangel
Michael" or simply " Archangel
Archangel
Michael". Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel
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Lucifer
Lucifer
Lucifer
(/ˈluːsɪfər/ LOO-sif-ər) is a name that, according to dictionaries of the English language, refers either to the Devil
Devil
or to the planet Venus
Venus
when appearing as the morning star.[1][2][3] As a name for the Devil, the more common meaning in English, "Lucifer" is the rendering of the Hebrew
Hebrew
word הֵילֵל in Isaiah
Isaiah
(Isaiah 14:12) given in the King James Version
King James Version
of the Bible. The translators of this version took the word from the Latin
Latin
Vulgate,[4] which translated הֵילֵל by the Latin
Latin
word lucifer (uncapitalized),[5][6] meaning "the morning star, the planet Venus", or, as an adjective, "light-bringing".[7] As a name for the morning star, "Lucifer" is a proper name and is capitalized in English
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Space Shuttle
The Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
was a partially reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft system operated by the U.S. National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA), as part of the Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
program. Its official program name was Space Transportation System
Space Transportation System
(STS), taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.[10] The first of four orbital test flights occurred in 1981, leading to operational flights beginning in 1982. In addition to the prototype whose completion was cancelled, five complete Shuttle systems were built and used on a total of 135 missions from 1981 to 2011, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida
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Saturn
by volume:6999963000000000000♠96.3%±2.4% hydrogen (H 2)6998325000000000000♠3.25%±2.4% helium (He)6997450000000000000♠0.45%±0.2% methane (CH 4)6996125000000000000♠0.0125%±0.0075% ammonia (NH 3)6996109999999999999♠0.0110%±0.0058% hydrogen deuteride (HD)6994700000000000000♠0.0007%±0.00015% ethane (C 2H 6)Ices:ammonia (NH 3) water (H 2O) ammonium hydrosulfide (NH 4SH) Saturn
Saturn
is the sixth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter
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Robert A. Heinlein
Robert Anson Heinlein (/ˈhaɪnlaɪn/;[2][3][4] July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was an American science fiction writer. Often called the "dean of science fiction writers",[5] his sometimes controversial works continue to have an influential effect on the genre, and on modern culture more generally. Heinlein became one of the first American science fiction writers to break into mainstream magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post
The Saturday Evening Post
in the late 1940s. He was one of the best-selling science fiction novelists for many decades, and he, Isaac Asimov, and Arthur C
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Locus Award For Best Science Fiction Novel
Winners of the Locus Award for Best SF Novel, awarded by the Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year. The award for Best Science Fiction Novel
Novel
was first presented in 1980, and is among the awards still presented (as of 2016[update]). Previously, there had simply been an award for Best Novel. A similar award for Best Fantasy Novel
Novel
was also introduced in 1980. Winners[edit]Year Winner1978 Gateway by Frederik Pohl1980 Titan by John Varley1981 The Snow Queen by Joan D
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New York Times Bestseller
The New York Times
The New York Times
Best Seller list is widely considered the preeminent list of best-selling books in the United States.[1][2] Published weekly in The New York Times
The New York Times
Book Review,[1] the best-seller list has been published in the Times since October 12, 1931.[1] In recent years it has evolved into multiple lists in different categories, broken down by fiction and non-fiction, hardcover, paperback, and electronic, and different genres.Contents1 History 2 Composition 3 Criticisms 4 Controversies 5 Studies 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]External image New York Times Best-seller List Oct
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Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
(or Kirkus Media) is an American book review magazine founded in 1933 by Virginia Kirkus
Virginia Kirkus
(1893–1980).[1] The magazine is headquartered in New York City.[2]Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksOverview[edit] Kirkus Reviews, published on the first and 15th of each month, previews books before their publication. Kirkus reviews over 7,000 titles per year.[1][3] In 2014, Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
started the Kirkus Prize. It is one of the richest literary awards in the world, bestowing $50,000 prizes annually to authors of fiction, nonfiction, and young readers’ literature.[4] Kirkus launched a fee-for-review program in 2005, originally called Kirkus Discoveries and now called Kirkus Indie
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David Langford
David Rowland Langford (born 10 April 1953)[1] is a British author, editor and critic, largely active within the science fiction field
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Blockbuster (entertainment)
A blockbuster is a work of entertainment – especially a feature film, but also applied to other media – which is highly popular and financially successful. The term has also come to refer to any large-budget production intended for "blockbuster" status, aimed at mass markets with associated merchandising, sometimes on a scale that meant the financial fortunes of a film studio or a distributor could depend on it.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The term began to appear in the American press in the early 1940s,[1] referring to aerial bombs capable of destroying a whole block of buildings.[2] It came to be applied to movies as a metaphor, indicating something successful on a dramatic scale. Successful films such as Quo Vadis, The Ten Commandments, Gone with the Wind, and Ben-Hur, were called "blockbusters" based purely on the amount of money earned at the box office
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