HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Fontana Dei Quattro Fiumi
Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi
Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi
(Fountain of the Four Rivers) is a fountain in the Piazza Navona
Piazza Navona
in Rome, Italy. It was designed in 1651 by Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Bernini
for Pope Innocent X
Pope Innocent X
whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced onto the piazza as did the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone of which Innocent was the sponsor. The base of the fountain is a basin from the centre of which travertine rocks rise to support four river gods and above them, an ancient Egyptian obelisk surmounted with the Pamphili
Pamphili
family emblem of a dove with an olive twig
[...More...]

"Fontana Dei Quattro Fiumi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Antonio Nibby
Antonio Nibby
Antonio Nibby
(October 4, 1792 at Amatrice
Amatrice
– December 29, 1839 at Rome) was an Italian archaeologist and topographer. Nibby was a critic of the history of ancient art and from 1812 in service to the Vatican worked to excavate the monuments of Rome. He also served as a secretary to Louis Napoleon, Comte de Saint-Leu. He was a professor of archaeology in the University of Rome
Rome
and in the French Academy in Rome
[...More...]

"Antonio Nibby" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Quirinal Hill
The Quirinal Hill
Quirinal Hill
(/ˈkwɪrɪnəl/; Latin: Collis Quirinalis; Italian: Quirinale [kwiriˈnaːle]) is one of the Seven Hills of Rome, at the north-east of the city center. It is the location of the official residence of the Italian head of state, who resides in the Quirinal Palace; by metonymy "the Quirinal" has come to stand for the Italian president. The Quirinal Palace
Quirinal Palace
has an extension of 1.2 million square feet.Piazza del Quirinale panoramaContents1 History 2 Palazzo
Palazzo
del Quirinale 3 Other monuments 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was originally part of a group of hills that included Collis Latiaris, Mucialis (or Sanqualis), Salutaris
[...More...]

"Quirinal Hill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Snake
Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes.[2] Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca
[...More...]

"Snake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

River God
A water deity is a deity in mythology associated with water or various bodies of water. Water deities are common in mythology and were usually more important among civilizations in which the sea or ocean, or a great river was more important. Another important focus of worship of water deities has been springs or holy wells. As a form of animal worship, whales and snakes (hence dragons) have been regarded as godly deities throughout the world (other animals are such as turtles, fish, crabs, and sharks)
[...More...]

"River God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Travertine Marble
Travertine
Travertine
is a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs, especially hot springs. Travertine
Travertine
often has a fibrous or concentric appearance and exists in white, tan, cream-colored, and even rusty varieties. It is formed by a process of rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate, often at the mouth of a hot spring or in a limestone cave. In the latter, it can form stalactites, stalagmites, and other speleothems
[...More...]

"Travertine Marble" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Borromini
Francesco Borromini, byname of Francesco Castelli (25 September 1599 – 2 August 1667),[1] was an Italian baroque architect born in today's Ticino[2] who, with his contemporaries Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Pietro da Cortona, was a leading figure in the emergence of Roman Baroque
Baroque
architecture. A keen student of the architecture of Michelangelo
Michelangelo
and the ruins of Antiquity, Borromini developed an inventive and distinctive, if somewhat idiosyncratic, architecture employing manipulations of Classical architectural forms, geometrical rationales in his plans and symbolic meanings in his buildings. He seems to have had a sound understanding of structures, which perhaps Bernini and Cortona, who were principally trained in other areas of the visual arts, lacked. His soft lead drawings are particularly distinctive
[...More...]

"Borromini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aswan
Aswan
Aswan
(Arabic: أسوان‎; Coptic: ⲥⲟⲩⲁⲛ) is a city in the south of Egypt, the capital of the Aswan
Aswan
Governorate. Aswan
Aswan
is a busy market and tourist centre located just north of the Aswan Dams
Aswan Dams
on the east bank of the Nile
Nile
at the first cataract. The modern city has expanded and includes the formerly separate community on the island of Elephantine.Contents1 Other spellings and variations 2 History 3 Climate 4 Education 5 Transport 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOther spellings and variations[edit] "Aswan" is pronounced (English: /ˌæsˈwɑːn/
[...More...]

"Aswan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Granite
Granite
Granite
( /ˈɡrænɪt/) is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin
Latin
granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. Strictly speaking, granite is an igneous rock with between 20% and 60% quartz by volume, and at least 35% of the total feldspar consisting of alkali feldspar, although commonly the term "granite" is used to refer to a wider range of coarse grained igneous rocks containing quartz and feldspar. The term "granitic" means granite-like and is applied to granite and a group of intrusive igneous rocks with similar textures and slight variations in composition and origin
[...More...]

"Granite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Domitian
14 September 81 – 18 September 96 (15 years)Predecessor TitusSuccessor NervaBorn (51-10-24)24 October 51 RomeDied 18 September 96(96-09-18) (aged 44) RomeBurial RomeWife Domitia Longina
Domitia Longina
(70–96)Issue son (80–83)Full name Titus
[...More...]

"Domitian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Serapeum
A serapeum is a temple or other religious institution dedicated to the syncretic Greco-Egyptian deity Serapis, who combined aspects of Osiris and Apis in a humanized form that was accepted by the Ptolemaic Greeks of Alexandria
[...More...]

"Serapeum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Temple Of The Gens Flavia
The Temple of the gens Flavia
Temple of the gens Flavia
(Latin: templum gentis Flaviae) was a Roman temple on the Quirinal Hill,[1] dedicated by Domitian
Domitian
at the end of the 1st century to other members of the Flavian dynasty.[2][3] It was sited at the ad Malum Punicum, on a site near the present-day junction of Via XX Settembre and Via delle Quattro Fontane.[4] This site was near the residences of Vespasian
Vespasian
(Domitian's birthplace) and Vespasian's brother Titus Flavius Sabinus. The temple is first mentioned in Book IX of Martial's Epigrams, a poetic work published ca. 94. This would make it seem that the temple was built and dedicated towards the end of Domitian's reign, as the culmination of his campaign to deify his elder brother Titus, Titus' daughter Julia Flavia
Julia Flavia
and Domitian's own son who had died in infancy.[5] In A.D
[...More...]

"Temple Of The Gens Flavia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Flavia (gens)
The gens Flavia was a plebeian family at Rome. Its members are first mentioned during the last three centuries of the Republic. The first of the Flavii to achieve prominence was Marcus Flavius, Tribune of the plebs in 327 and 323 BC; however, no Flavius attained the consulship until Gaius Flavius Fimbria in 104 BC. The gens became illustrious during the first century AD, when the family of the Flavii Sabini claimed the imperial dignity. Under the Empire, the number of persons bearing this nomen becomes very large, perhaps due to the great number of freedmen under the Flavian dynasty
Flavian dynasty
of emperors
[...More...]

"Flavia (gens)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Papal Coats Of Arms
Papal coats of arms
Papal coats of arms
are the personal coat of arms of popes of the Catholic Church
[...More...]

"Papal Coats Of Arms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hieroglyph
A hieroglyph (Greek for "sacred writing") was a character of the ancient Egyptian writing system. Logographic scripts that are pictographic in form in a way reminiscent of ancient Egyptian are also sometimes called "hieroglyphs".[1] In Neoplatonism, especially during the Renaissance, a "hieroglyph" was an artistic representation of an esoteric idea, which Neoplatonists believed actual Egyptian hieroglyphs to be. The word hieroglyphics refer to a hieroglyphic script. Only those privileged with an extensive education (i.e
[...More...]

"Hieroglyph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vespasian
Vespasian
Vespasian
(/vɛsˈpeɪʒiən, vɛsˈpeɪziən/; Latin: Titus
Titus
Flavius Vespasianus;[note 1] 17 November 9 – 24 June 79 AD)[1] was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79, the fourth, and last, in the Year of the Four Emperors. He founded the Flavian dynasty
Flavian dynasty
that ruled the Empire for 27 years. Vespasian
Vespasian
was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors
[...More...]

"Vespasian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.