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Folk Music Of Ireland
IRISH TRADITIONAL MUSIC (also known as IRISH TRAD, IRISH FOLK MUSIC, and other variants) is a genre of folk music that developed in Ireland . In A History of Irish Music (1905), W. H. Grattan Flood wrote that, in Gaelic Ireland
Ireland
, there were at least ten instruments in general use. These were the cruit (a small harp) and clairseach (a bigger harp with typically 30 strings), the timpan (a small string instrument played with a bow or plectrum ), the feadan (a fife ), the buinne (an oboe or flute ), the guthbuinne (a bassoon -type horn ), the bennbuabhal and corn (hornpipes ), the cuislenna (bagpipes – see Great Irish Warpipes ), the stoc and sturgan (clarions or trumpets), and the cnamha (castanets ). There is also evidence of the fiddle being used in the 8th century
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Delia Murphy
DELIA MURPHY KIERNAN (16 February 1902 – 11 February 1971) was a singer and collector of Irish ballads . She recorded several 78 rpm records in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. In 1962 she recorded her only LP , The Queen of Connemara, for Irish Prestige Records, New York, on the cover of which her name appears alongside the LP title. During World War II , she aided Vatican official, Monsignor Hugh O\'Flaherty , in saving the lives of 6,500 Allied soldiers and Jews, while her husband, Dr. Thomas J. Kiernan, was the Irish Ambassador in Rome from 1941–46. CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 World War II * 3 Later life * 4 Death * 5 References * 6 Sources EARLY LIFEShe was born in Ardroe, Roundfort , County Mayo , Ireland to a well-off family. Her father, John Murphy, from nearby Hollymount , made his fortune in the Klondike Gold Rush . While in America, he married Ann Fanning from Roscrea , County Tipperary
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Irish Showband
The IRISH SHOWBAND is a dance band format which was popular in Ireland
Ireland
mid-1950s to the mid-1980s; though some showbands have survived until the present day. The showband was based on the internationally popular six- or seven-piece dance band. The band's basic repertoire included standard dance numbers and covers of pop music hits. The versatile music ranged from rock and roll and country and western songs to traditional dixieland jazz and even Irish Céilí dance, Newfie stomps, folk music and waltzes. Key to a Showband's popular success was the ability to perform songs currently in the record charts . Some bands also did comedy skits onstage. The lineup usually featured a rhythm section of drums, lead, rhythm and bass guitars, a keyboard instrument, and a brass section of trumpet, saxophone and trombone. The band was fronted by one or two lead singers, who were assisted by other band members on backing vocals
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The Chieftains
THE CHIEFTAINS are a traditional Irish band formed in Dublin
Dublin
in November 1962, by Paddy Moloney , Sean Potts and Michael Tubridy . The band had their first rehearsals at Moloney's house, with Tubridy, Martin Fay and David Fallon. Their sound, which is almost entirely instrumental and largely built around uilleann pipes , has become synonymous with traditional Irish music and they are regarded as having helped popularise Irish music across the world. Paddy Moloney came out of Ceoltóirí Chualann , a group of musicians who specialised in instrumentals, and sought to form a new band. The group remained only semi-professional up until the 1970s and by then had achieved great success in Ireland and the United Kingdom
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Fleadh Cheoil
The FLEADH CHEOIL (Irish pronunciation: , meaning "festival of music") is an Irish music competition run by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann (CCÉ). There are various stages to the competition. In Ireland there are county and provincial competitions leading to the All-Ireland Fleadh. In Britain there are regional, then national stages of qualification for the All-Ireland. North America has two regional qualifying Fleadh Cheoil. The Mid Atlantic Fleadh covers the US eastern seaboard, eastern Canada and the Maritimes. The Midwest Fleadh covers the rest of North America from Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, Atlanta and Detroit to San Francisco. Competitions are divided into the following age categories: under 12, 12–15, 15–18, and over 18 (senior). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Competition categories * 3 Application * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYThe first national festival of Irish traditional music was held in Mullingar in 1951
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Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
COMHALTAS CEOLTóIRí ÉIREANN (Irish pronunciation: , meaning "Society of the Musicians of Ireland") is the primary Irish organisation dedicated to the promotion of the music , song , dance and the language of Ireland. The organisation was founded in 1951 and has promoted Irish music and culture among the Irish people and the Irish diaspora . Its current Director General is Senator Labhrás Ó Murchú . Today it has more than 400 branches worldwide, in Republic of Ireland , the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada, Mexico, France, Spain, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Russia, Australia and New Zealand. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Activities * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYComhaltas was founded in 1951 in Mullingar , County Westmeath by a group of traditional pipers who felt that the Irish musical tradition was in decline; it was initially named CUMANN CEOLTóIRí NA HÉIREANN, changing to its present name in 1952
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Colm Ó Lochlainn
COLM Ó LOCHLAINN (1892 – 26 June 1972) was a printer, typographer, collector of Irish ballads and traditional Irish Uilleann piper . He was notably the author of Irish Street Ballads published in 1939 and More Irish Street Ballads in 1965. CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Family * 3 Selected publications * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Further reading * 7 External links LIFEA native of Kilkenny , Ó Lochlainn was a member of the Irish volunteers in 1916. He was part of a team which was sent to Kerry on Good Friday in a bid to seize radio equipment for communication with The Aud, a German ship transporting arms from Germany for the Easter Rising. He and a colleague, Denis Daly made it to their destination but a second car transporting three others crashed into the river at Ballykissane, Killorglin, killing three members of the team, Con Keating, Donal Sheehan and Charlie Monaghan. Ó Lochlainn established the Candle Press in 1916
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George Petrie (artist)
GEORGE PETRIE (1 January 1790 – 17 January 1866), was an Irish painter, musician, antiquary and archaeologist of the Victorian era . CONTENTS * 1 Personal life * 2 Career * 3 Bibliography * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links PERSONAL LIFEGeorge Petrie was born in Dublin , Ireland, and grew up there, living at 21 Great Charles Street just off Mountjoy Square . He was the son of the portrait and miniature painter James Petrie, a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, who had settled in Dublin. He was interested in art from an early age. He was sent to the Dublin Society\'s Schools, being educated as an artist, where he won the silver medal in 1805, aged fourteen. CAREER Vice-Regal Lodge, Dublin, c.1831 – by George Petrie
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Oral Tradition
ORAL TRADITION, or ORAL LORE, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another. The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history , oral literature , oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system , or in parallel to a writing system. Indian religions such as Buddhism, Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism, for example, have used an oral tradition, in parallel to a writing system, to transmit their canonical scriptures, secular knowledge such as Sushruta Samhita , hymns and mythologies from one generation to the next
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Cultural Diffusion
In cultural anthropology and cultural geography , CULTURAL DIFFUSION, as conceptualized by Leo Frobenius in his 1897/98 publication Der westafrikanische Kulturkreis , is the spread of cultural items—such as ideas , styles , religions , technologies , languages etc.—between individuals, whether within a single culture or from one culture to another. It is distinct from the diffusion of innovations within a specific culture
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Rock And Roll
ROCK AND ROLL (often written as ROCK "> Sign commemorating the role of Alan Freed
Alan Freed
and Cleveland
Cleveland
, Ohio in the origins of rock and roll The term "rock and roll" now has at least two different meanings, both in common usage. The American Heritage Dictionary and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary both define rock and roll as synonymous with rock music . Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
, on the other hand, regards it as the music that originated in the mid-1950s and later developed "into the more encompassing international style known as rock music". The phrase "rocking and rolling" originally described the movement of a ship on the ocean, but was used by the early twentieth century, both to describe the spiritual fervor of black church rituals and as a sexual analogy
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Saint's Day
The CALENDAR OF SAINTS is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the FEAST DAY or FEAST of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint". The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's DIES NATALIS ("day of birth"). In the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
, a calendar of saints is called a Menologion . "Menologion" may also mean a set of icons on which saints are depicted in the order of the dates of their feasts, often made in two panels
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Dance Music
DANCE MUSIC is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing . It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. While there exist attestations of the combination of dance and music in ancient times (for example Ancient Greek vases sometimes show dancers accompanied by musicians), the earliest Western dance music that we can still reproduce with a degree of certainty are the surviving medieval dances . In the Baroque period, the major dance styles were noble court dances (see Baroque dance ). In the classical music era , the minuet was frequently used as a third movement , although in this context it would not accompany any dancing. The waltz also arose later in the classical era
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Isometre
In music , HOMORHYTHM (also HOMOMETER) is a texture where there is a "sameness of rhythm in all parts" or "very similar rhythm " as would be used in simple hymn or chorale settings. Homorhythm is a condition of homophony . All voices sing the same rhythm. This texture results in a homophonic texture, which is a blocked chordal texture. Homorhythmic texture delivers lyrics with clarity and emphasis. Texture in which parts have different rhythms is HETERORYTHMIC or HETEROMETRIC. The term is used for compositions in which all the voice-parts move simultaneously in the same rhythm, forming a succession of chords. It may also be called chordal style, familiar style, note-against-note style, isometric, and homophonic . Isometric may used to refer to music in which each vocal part has the same number of syllables, with isorythmic being used to refer to music in which each voice has the same rhythm
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Lament
A LAMENT or LAMENTATION is a passionate expression of grief , often in music , poetry , or song form. The grief is most often born of regret , or mourning . Laments can also be expressed in a verbal manner, where the participant would lament about something they regret or someone they've lost, usually accompanied by wailing, moaning and/or crying . Laments constitute some of the oldest forms of writing and examples are present across human cultures. CONTENTS * 1 History
History
* 2 Scottish laments * 3 Musical form * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 Sources * 7 External links HISTORY Egyptian women weeping and lamenting. Many of the oldest and most lasting poems in human history have been laments. The Lament for Sumer and Ur
Lament for Sumer and Ur
dates back at least 4000 years to ancient Sumer
Sumer
, the world's first urban civilization
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Scottish National Gallery
1,544,069 (2015) * Ranked 10th nationally PUBLIC TRANSIT ACCESS Waverley WEBSITE www.nationalgalleries.org Scottish National Gallery, viewed from the north The lower entrance of the Scottish National Gallery
Scottish National Gallery
in Princes Street Gardens Interior of the ground floor main galleries of the Scottish National Gallery
Scottish National Gallery
"Montagne Sainte-Victoire" by Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) "Mrs Robert Scott Moncrieff" by Sir Henry Raeburn
Henry Raeburn
(1756–1823) "The Lomellini Family" by Van Dyck (1599–1641) "Madonna and Child" by Don Lorenzo Monaco (1370–1425) Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Castle and National Gallery (3610788685) The SCOTTISH NATIONAL GALLERY is the national art gallery of Scotland
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