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Folk Music Of Ireland
Irish traditional music
Irish traditional music
(also known as Irish trad, Irish folk music, and other variants) is a genre of folk music that developed in Ireland. In A History of Irish Music (1905), W. H. Grattan Flood
W. H

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Dance Music
Dance
Dance
music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. While there exist attestations of the combination of dance and music in ancient times (for example Ancient Greek vases sometimes show dancers accompanied by musicians), the earliest Western dance music that we can still reproduce with a degree of certainty are the surviving medieval dances. In the Baroque period, the major dance styles were noble court dances (see Baroque dance). In the classical music era, the minuet was frequently used as a third movement, although in this context it would not accompany any dancing. The waltz also arose later in the classical era
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James Goodman (musicologist)
Canon James Goodman (1828–1896) was a Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
clergyman, a piper and a collector of Irish music
Irish music
and songs. Raised in Ventry, County Kerry, a Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
area, he was a native Irish language speaker. He became Professor of Irish at Trinity College, Dublin.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 As a cleric 1.2 As a music collector 1.3 As a Professor of Irish2 References 3 External referenceLife[edit] As a cleric[edit] Goodman studied at Trinity College, Dublin, having gained a scholarship in 1847. He was ordained curate of the Church of Ireland in 1851 (his father the Reverend Thomas Chute Goodman had been rector of Dingle) and James married Charlotte King in 1852. They had three sons, one of whom later drowned while a student, the other two setting up a medical practice in Brigg, Lincolnshire
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Calotype
Calotype
Calotype
or talbotype is an early photographic process introduced in 1841 by William Henry Fox Talbot,[1] using paper[2] coated with silver iodide. The term calotype comes from the Greek καλός (kalos), "beautiful", and τύπος (tupos), "impression".Thomas Duncan, by Hill & Adamson, c. 1844; medium: calotype print, size: 19.60 x 14.50 cm; from the collection of the National Galleries of ScotlandA salted paper calotype photograph of Scottish amateur golfer, golf administrator, and aristocrat James Ogilvie Fairlie, c. 1846-49Contents1 The process 2 Popularity 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksThe process[edit] Talbot made his first successful camera photographs in 1835 using paper sensitised with silver chloride, which darkened in proportion to its exposure to light
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List Of Irish Music Collectors
This is a list of notable collectors of Irish traditional music:Contents1 Collectors1.1 Significant Irish music collections by unknown authors2 See also 3 References and notesCollectors[edit] Breandan Breathnach (1912–1985) – collected over 7,000 tunes, published from 1963 Edward Bunting
Edward Bunting
(1773–1843) – collected tunes from the harpers at the Belfast
Belfast
Harp Festival; made extensive collections of tunes which he published in three collections of The Ancient Music of Ireland Séamus Clandillon, see Maighréad Ní Annagáin Eileen Costello – Amhrain Mhuighe Seola, 1923, 80 songs from Co. Galway and Co. Mayo Seamus Ennis
Seamus Ennis
(1919–1982) – uilleann piper; collected for the BBC/Irish Folklore Commission, 1952–57 Aloys Fleischmann
Aloys Fleischmann
(1910–1992) William Forde (c.1759–1850) A
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Colm Ó Lochlainn
Colm Ó Lochlainn (1892 – 26 June 1972) was a printer, typographer, collector of Irish ballads and traditional Irish Uilleann piper. He was notably the author of Irish Street Ballads published in 1939 and More Irish Street Ballads in 1965.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Selected publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] A native of Kilkenny, Ó Lochlainn was a member of the Irish volunteers in 1916. He was part of a team which was sent to Kerry on Good Friday in a bid to seize radio equipment for communication with The Aud, a German ship transporting arms from Germany for the Easter Rising. He and a colleague, Denis Daly made it to their destination but a second car transporting three others crashed into the river at Ballykissane, Killorglin, killing three members of the team, Con Keating, Donal Sheehan and Charlie Monaghan. Ó Lochlainn established the Candle Press in 1916
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George Petrie (artist)
George may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 South Africa 2.4 United States3 In computing 4 Film and television 5 Books 6 Music 7 In transport 8 Other uses 9 See alsoPeople[edit] George (given name) George (surname) King George (other) Saint George George Washington (other)Places[edit] Australia[edit]Lake George (New South Wales)Canada[edit]George's Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador George Street (St. John's), NewfoundlandSouth Africa[edit]George, Western Cape George AirportUnited States[edit] George Air Force Base, a former U.S
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Hill & Adamson
In 1843 painter David Octavius Hill
David Octavius Hill
joined engineer Robert Adamson to form Scotland's first photographic studio.[1] During their brief partnership that ended with Adamson's untimely death, Hill & Adamson produced "the first substantial body of self-consciously artistic work using the newly invented medium of photography."[2] Watercolorist John Harden, on first seeing Hill & Adamson's calotypes in November 1843, wrote, "The pictures produced are as Rembrandt's but improved, so l
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Lisdoonvarna
Lisdoonvarna
Lisdoonvarna
(Irish: Lios Dúin Bhearna, meaning "fort of the gapped keep")[2] is a spa town of 739 people (2011 census) in County Clare
County Clare
in Ireland. The town is famous for its music and festivals. Although the music festival was discontinued in the 1980s, Lisdoonvarna
Lisdoonvarna
still hosts its annual matchmaking festival each September.Contents1 Geography 2 Name 3 History 4 Arts and culture4.1 Events5 Infrastructure5.1 Spa 5.2 Transport6 See also 7 References and notes 8 External linksGeography[edit] Lisdoonvarna
Lisdoonvarna
is located in the area of County Clare
County Clare
known as the Burren, on the N67 road between Ballyvaughan
Ballyvaughan
and Ennistymon
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Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
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The Chieftains
The Chieftains
The Chieftains
are a traditional Irish band formed in Dublin
Dublin
in 1963, by Paddy Moloney, Sean Potts and Michael Tubridy. The band had their first rehearsals at Moloney's house, with Tubridy, Martin Fay and David Fallon. Their sound, which is almost entirely instrumental and largely built around uilleann pipes, has become synonymous with traditional Irish music and they are regarded as having helped popularise Irish music across the world.[1] Paddy Moloney
Paddy Moloney
came out of Ceoltóirí Chualann, a group of musicians who specialised in instrumentals, and sought to form a new band. The group remained only semi-professional up until the 1970s and by then had achieved great success in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In 1973, their popularity began to spread to the United States when their previous albums were released there by Island Records
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Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
(Irish pronunciation: [kɔwal̪ˠt̪ˠəsˠ coːl̪ˠt̪ˠoːɾʲiː ˈeːrʲən̪ˠ], meaning "Society of the Musicians of Ireland") is the primary Irish organisation dedicated to the promotion of the music, song, dance and the language of Ireland
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Fleadh Cheoil
The Fleadh Cheoil
Fleadh Cheoil
(Irish pronunciation: [fʲlʲaː çoːlʲ], meaning "festival of music") is an Irish music competition run by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
(CCÉ). There are various stages to the competition. In Ireland there are county and provincial competitions leading to the All-Ireland Fleadh. In Britain there are regional, then national stages of qualification for the All-Ireland. North America has two regional qualifying Fleadh Cheoil. The Mid Atlantic Fleadh[1] covers the US eastern seaboard, eastern Canada and the Maritimes. The Midwest Fleadh[2] covers the rest of North America from Cleveland, Chicago, St
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Punk Rock
Punk
Punk
rock (or "punk") is a rock music genre that developed in the mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other forms of what is now known as "proto-punk" music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk
Punk
bands typically produced short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk
Punk
embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produce recordings and distribute them through independent record labels and other informal channels. The term "punk rock" was first used by certain American rock critics in the early 1970s to describe 1960s garage bands and subsequent acts then perceived as stylistic inheritors. Between 1974 and 1976 the movement now bearing the name "punk rock" emerged
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Rock And Roll
Rock and roll
Rock and roll
(often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s,[1][2] from African American musical styles such as gospel, jump blues, jazz, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues,[3] along with country music.[4] While elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records from the 1920s[5] and in country records of the 1930s,[4] the genre did not acquire its name until 1954.[6][7] According to Greg Kot, "rock and roll" refers to a style of popular music originating in the U.S
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Delia Murphy
Delia Murphy Kiernan (16 February 1902 – 11 February 1971) was a singer and collector of Irish ballads. She recorded several 78 rpm records in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. In 1962 she recorded her only LP, The Queen of Connemara, for Irish Prestige Records, New York, on the cover of which her name appears alongside the LP title. During World War II, she aided Vatican official, Monsignor
Monsignor
Hugh O'Flaherty, in saving the lives of 6,500 Allied soldiers and Jews, while her husband, Dr. Thomas J. Kiernan, was the Irish Ambassador in Rome from 1941–46.Contents1 Early life 2 World War II 3 Later life 4 Death 5 References 6 SourcesEarly life[edit] She was born in Ardroe, Roundfort, County Mayo, Ireland to a well-off family. Her father, John Murphy, from nearby Hollymount, made his fortune in the Klondike Gold Rush. While in America, he married Ann Fanning from Roscrea, County Tipperary
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