HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Flower
A flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen
[...More...]

picture info

Taxon
In biology, a taxon (plural taxa; back-formation from taxonomy) is a group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms seen by taxonomists to form a unit.[clarification needed] Although neither is required, a taxon is usually known by a particular name and given a particular ranking, especially if and when it is accepted or becomes established. It is not uncommon, however, for taxonomists to remain at odds over what belongs to a taxon and the criteria used for inclusion. If a taxon is given a formal scientific name, its use is then governed by one of the nomenclature codes specifying which scientific name is correct for a particular grouping. Initial attempts at classifying and ordering organisms (plants and/or animals) was set forth in Linnaeus's system in Systema Naturae, 10th edition, (1758)[1] as well as an unpublished work by Bernard and Antoine Laurent de Jussieu
[...More...]

picture info

Netherlands
The Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: Nederland, [ˈneːdərlɑnt] (listen)) is a country located in Northwestern Europe
Northwestern Europe
with some overseas territories. In Europe, it consists of twelve provinces that border Germany
Germany
to the east, Belgium
Belgium
to the south, and the North Sea
North Sea
to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea
North Sea
with Belgium, Germany
Germany
and the United Kingdom.[11] Together with three island territories in the Caribbean Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius
Sint Eustatius
and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
[...More...]

picture info

Floral Diagram
A diagram is a symbolic representation of information according to some visualization technique. Diagrams have been used since ancient times, but became more prevalent during the Enlightenment.[1] Sometimes, the technique uses a three-dimensional visualization which is then projected onto a two-dimensional surface. The word graph is sometimes used as a synonym for diagram.Contents1 Overview 2 Main diagram types 3 Specific diagram types 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingOverview[edit] The term "diagram" in its commonly used sense can have a general or specific meaning:visual information device : Like the term "illustration", "diagram" is used as a collective term standing for the whole class of technical genres, including graphs, technical drawings and tables.[2] specific kind of visual display : This is the genre that shows qualitative data with shapes that are connected by lines, arrows, or other visual links.In science the term is used in both ways
[...More...]

picture info

Diaspore (botany)
In botany, a diaspore is a plant dispersal unit consisting of a seed or spore plus any additional tissues that assist dispersal. In some seed plants, the diaspore is a seed and fruit together, or a seed and elaiosome. In a few seed plants, the diaspore is most or all of the plant, and is known as a tumbleweed. Diaspores are common in weedy and ruderal species. Collectively, diaspores, seeds, and spores that have been modified for migration are disseminules. Role in dispersal[edit] A diaspore of seed plus elaiosome is a common adaptation to seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory). This is most notable in Australian and South African sclerophyll plant communities.[1] Typically, ants carry the diaspore to their nest, where they may eat the elaiosome and discard the seed, and the seed may subsequently germinate.Achenes of a dandelion (Taraxacum)A diaspore of seed(s) plus fruit is common in plants dispersed by frugivores
[...More...]

picture info

Parthenocarpy
In botany and horticulture, parthenocarpy (literally meaning "virgin fruit") is the natural or artificially induced production of fruit without fertilization of ovules, which makes the fruit seedless. Stenospermocarpy may also produce apparently seedless fruit, but the seeds are actually aborted while they are still small. Parthenocarpy (or stenospermocarpy) occasionally occurs as a mutation in nature; if it affects every flower the plant can no longer sexually reproduce but might be able to propagate by apomixis or by vegetative means. However, parthenocarpy of some fruits on a plant may be of value. Up to 20% of the fruits of wild parsnip are parthenocarpic
[...More...]

picture info

Adnation
Adnation
Adnation
in Angiosperms is the fusion of two or more whorls of a flower, e.g. stamens to petals".[1] This is in contrast to connation, the fusion among a single whorl.[2][3]The stamens of Primula vulgaris
Primula vulgaris
are adnate to the corollaReferences[edit]^ Little, R. John; Jones, C. Eugene, eds. (1980). A Dictionary of Botany. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company. p. 9. ISBN 0-442-24169-0.  ^ Little, R. John; Jones, C. Eugene, eds. (1980). A Dictionary of Botany. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company. p. 91. ISBN 0-442-24169-0.  ^ Jackson, Benjamin Daydon (1928). A Glossary of Botanic Terms with their Derivation and Accent (fourth ed.). London: Gerald Duckworth & Co. Ltd. p. 89. This botany article is a stub
[...More...]

picture info

Medicine
Medicine
Medicine
is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Medicine
Medicine
encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness. Contemporary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, and prevent injury and disease, typically through pharmaceuticals or surgery, but also through therapies as diverse as psychotherapy, external splints and traction, medical devices, biologics, and ionizing radiation, amongst others.[1] Medicine
Medicine
has existed for thousands of years, during most of which it was an art (an area of skill and knowledge) frequently having connections to the religious and philosophical beliefs of local culture
[...More...]

picture info

Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
[...More...]

picture info

Reproduction
Reproduction
Reproduction
(or procreation or breeding) is the biological process by which new individual organisms – "offspring" – are produced from their "parents". Reproduction
Reproduction
is a fundamental feature of all known life; each individual organism exists as the result of reproduction. There are two forms of reproduction: asexual and sexual. In asexual reproduction, an organism can reproduce without the involvement of another organism. Asexual reproduction
Asexual reproduction
is not limited to single-celled organisms. The cloning of an organism is a form of asexual reproduction. By asexual reproduction, an organism creates a genetically similar or identical copy of itself. The evolution of sexual reproduction is a major puzzle for biologists
[...More...]

Floral (other)
To be floral is to pertain to flowers. Floral may also refer to:Floral, Arkansas, an unincorporated community in the United States Floral, Kansas, an unincorporated community in the United States Floral, Saskatchewan, an unincorporated community in Canada Floral Street, London, EnglandSee also[edit]Flora (other) Floral Hall (other)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Floral. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
[...More...]

picture info

Zantedeschia Aethiopica
Zantedeschia
Zantedeschia
aethiopica (known as calla lily and arum lily) is a species in the family Araceae, native to southern Africa
Africa
in Lesotho, South Africa, and Swaziland.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Cultivation 4 Symbolism 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Inflorescence
Inflorescence
and spathe Zantedeschia
Zantedeschia
aethiopica is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant, evergreen where rainfall and temperatures are adequate, deciduous where there is a dry season. Its preferred habitat is in streams and ponds or on the banks. It grows to 0.6–1 m (2.0–3.3 ft) tall, with large clumps of broad, arrow shaped dark green leaves up to 45 cm (18 in) long
[...More...]

picture info

Bellis Perennis
Bellis
Bellis
perennis is a common European species of daisy, of the Asteraceae
Asteraceae
family, often considered the archetypal species of that name. Many related plants also share the name "daisy", so to distinguish this species from other daisies it is sometimes qualified as common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy. Historically, it has also been commonly known as bruisewort and occasionally woundwort (although the common name woundwort is now more closely associated with Stachys (woundworts))
[...More...]

picture info

Radial Symmetry
Symmetry
Symmetry
in biology is the balanced distribution of duplicate body parts or shapes within the body of an organism. In nature and biology, symmetry is always approximate. For example, plant leaves – while considered symmetrical – rarely match up exactly when folded in half. Symmetry
Symmetry
creates a class of patterns in nature, where the near-repetition of the pattern element is by reflection or rotation. The body plans of most multicellular organisms exhibit some form of symmetry, whether radial, bilateral, or spherical
[...More...]

picture info

Ranunculus Glaberrimus
Ranunculus
Ranunculus
glaberrimus, the sagebrush buttercup,[1] is a species of flowering plant in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae
[...More...]

picture info

Whorl (botany)
In botany, a whorl or verticil is an arrangement of sepals, petals, leaves, stipules or branches that radiate from a single point and surround or wrap around the stem.[1][2] A whorl consists of at least three elements; a pair of opposite leaves is not called a whorl. The morphology of most Angiosperm
Angiosperm
flowers is based on four whorls:the calyx, a whorl of sepals at the base, above which are the corolla, a whorl of petals, the androecium, a whorl of stamens (each comprising a filament and an anther), and the gynoecium, a whorl of the female parts of a flower: the stigma, style and ovary.A flower lacking any of these floral structures is said to be incomplete or imperfect.[3] Not all flowers consist of whorls since the parts may instead be spirally arranged, as in Magnoliaceae. For leaves to grow in whorls is fairly unusual except in plant species with very short internodes
[...More...]

.