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Flag Of The United States Bureau Of Indian Affairs
An AFFAIR is a sexual relationship , romantic friendship , or passionate attachment between two people without the attached person's significant other knowing
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Affair (other)
An AFFAIR is a sexual relationship, romantic friendship, or passionate attachment between two people without the attached person's significant other knowing. AFFAIR may also refer to: * Affair (album) , an album by Cherrelle * Affairs (album) , an album by Elliott Murphy * Affair (film) , a 2010 Indonesian film * Political affairs, see political scandal SEE ALSO * The Affair (other) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title AFFAIR. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Affair_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Sexual Relationship
An INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP is an interpersonal relationship that involves physical and/or emotional intimacy . Physical intimacy is characterized by friendship , platonic love , romantic love , or sexual activity . While the term intimate relationship commonly implies the inclusion of a SEXUAL RELATIONSHIP, the term is also used as a euphemism for a relationship that is strictly sexual. Intimate relationships play a central role in the overall human experience. Humans have a general desire to belong and to love, which is usually satisfied within an intimate relationship. These relationships involve feelings of liking or loving one or more people, romance, physical or sexual attraction , sexual relationships, or emotional and personal support between the members. Intimate relationships allow a social network for people to form strong emotional attachments. CONTENTS* 1 Intimacy * 1.1 Types * 2 Physical and emotional * 3 Empirical research * 4 Current studies * 5 History * 5.1 Ancient philosophers: Aristotle
Aristotle
* 5.2 1880s to early 1900s * 5.3 1960s and 1970s * 5.4 1980s to 2000s * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links INTIMACYIntimacy generally refers to the feeling of being in a close personal association and belonging together. It is a familiar and very close affective connection with another as a result of a bond that is formed through knowledge and experience of the other
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Romantic Friendship
A ROMANTIC FRIENDSHIP or PASSIONATE FRIENDSHIP is a very close but typically non-sexual relationship between friends , often involving a degree of physical closeness beyond that which is common in the contemporary Western societies . It may include for example holding hands , cuddling , hugging , kissing , giving massages , and sharing a bed, or co-sleeping , without sexual intercourse or other physical sexual expression. In historical scholarship, the term may be used to describe a very close relationship between people of the same sex during a period of history when homosexuality did not exist as a social category. In this regard, the term was coined in the later 20th century in order to retrospectively describe a type of relationship which until the mid 19th century had been considered unremarkable but since the second half of the 19th century had become more rare as physical intimacy between non-sexual partners came to be regarded with anxiety. Romantic friendship between women in Europe and North America became especially prevalent in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, with the simultaneous emergence of female education and a new rhetoric of sexual difference . Shimer College founders Cindarella Gregory and Frances Shimer in 1869; their extremely close relationship has been characterized as a "passionate friendship"
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Passion (emotion)
PASSION (from the Greek verb πασχω meaning to suffer) is a very strong feeling about a person or thing. Passion is an intense emotion , a compelling enthusiasm or desire for something. Passion may be a friendly or eager interest in or admiration for a proposal, cause, discovery, or activity or love – to a feeling of unusual excitement, enthusiasm or compelling emotion, a positive affinity or love, towards a subject. It is particularly used in the context of romance or sexual desire though it generally implies a deeper or more encompassing emotion than that implied by the term lust . Denis Diderot
Denis Diderot
describes passions as "penchants, inclinations, desires and aversions carried to a certain degree of intensity, combined with an indistinct sensation of pleasure or pain, occasioned or accompanied by some irregular movement of the blood and animal spirits, are what we call passions. They can be so strong as to inhibit all practice of personal freedom, a state in which the soul is in some sense rendered passive; whence the name passions. This inclination or so-called disposition of the soul, is born of the opinion we hold that a great good or a great evil is contained in an object which in and of itself arouses passion"
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Significant Other
SIGNIFICANT OTHER (SO) is colloquially used as a gender-neutral term for a person's partner in an intimate relationship without disclosing or presuming anything about marital status, relationship status, or sexual orientation . Synonyms with similar properties include sweetheart, better half, spouse, domestic partner, lover, soulmate , or life partner . In the United States, the term is sometimes used in invitations, such as to weddings and office parties. This use of the term has become common in the UK in correspondence from hospitals, e.g., "you may be accompanied for your appointment by a significant other". CONTENTS * 1 Scientific use * 2 First use * 3 See also * 4 References SCIENTIFIC USEIts usage in psychology and sociology is very different from its colloquial use. In psychology, a significant other is any person who has great importance to an individual's life or well-being . In sociology, it describes any person or persons with a strong influence on an individual's self concept . Although the influence of significant others on individuals was long theorized, the first actual measurements of the influence of significant others on individuals were made by Archie O. Haller, Edward L. Fink, and Joseph Woelfel at the University of Wisconsin. Haller, Fink, and Woelfel are associates of the Wisconsin model of status attainment
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Love
LOVE is a variety of different emotional and mental states, typically strongly and positively experienced, that ranges from deepest interpersonal affection to simple pleasure . An example of this range of meanings is that the love of a mother differs from the love of a spouse differs from the love of food. Most commonly, love refers to an emotion of a strong attraction and personal attachment . Love can also be a virtue representing human kindness , compassion , and affection—"the unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another". It may also describe compassionate and affectionate actions towards other humans, one's self or animals. Ancient Greek philosophers identified four forms of love: essentially, familial love (in Greek , _storge _), friendly love (_philia _), romantic love (_eros _), and divine love (_agape _). Modern authors have distinguished further varieties of love: infatuated love , self-love , and courtly love . Non-Western traditions have also distinguished variants or symbioses of these states . Love has additional religious or spiritual meaning. This diversity of uses and meanings combined with the complexity of the feelings involved makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, compared to other emotional states
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Affection
AFFECTION, ATTRACTION, INFATUATION, or FONDNESS is a "disposition or state of mind or body" that is often associated with a feeling or type of love . It has given rise to a number of branches of philosophy and psychology concerning emotion, disease, influence, and state of being. "Affection" is popularly used to denote a feeling or type of love , amounting to more than goodwill or friendship . Writers on ethics generally use the word to refer to distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic. Some contrast it with _passion _ as being free from the distinctively sensual element. Even a very simple demonstration of affection can have a broad variety of emotional reactions, from embarrassment to disgust to pleasure and annoyance. It also has a different physical effect on the giver and the receiver. CONTENTS * 1 Restricted definition * 2 Expression * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 Further reading * 6 External links RESTRICTED DEFINITION _ This section is largely based on an article in the out-of-copyright Encyclopædia Britannica_ Eleventh Edition , which was produced in 1911. It should be brought up to date to reflect subsequent history or scholarship (including the references, if any). When you have completed the review, replace this notice with a simple note on this article's talk page
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Human Bonding
HUMAN BONDING is the process of development of a close, interpersonal relationship . It most commonly takes place between family members or friends, but can also develop among groups, such as sporting teams and whenever people spend time together. Bonding is a mutual, interactive process, and is different from simple liking . Bonding typically refers to the process of attachment that develops between romantic or platonic partners, close friends, or parents and children. This bond is characterized by emotions such as affection and trust . Any two people who spend time together may form a bond. Male bonding refers to the establishment of relationships between men through shared activities. The term female bonding refers to the formation of close personal relationships between women. CONTENTS * 1 Early views * 2 Pair bonding * 2.1 Limerent bond * 3 Parental bonding * 3.1 Attachment * 3.2 Maternal bonding * 3.3 Paternal bonding * 4 Human–animal bonding * 5 Neurobiology * 5.1 Prolactin * 6 Weak ties * 7 Debonding and loss * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 Further reading * 10.1 Books * 10.2 Articles * 11 External links EARLY VIEWSIn the 4th century BC, the Greek philosopher Plato argued that love directs the bonds of human society. In his _Symposium _, Eryximachus, one of the narrators in the dialog, states that love goes far beyond simple attraction to human beauty
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Broken Heart
A BROKEN HEART (also known as a HEARTBREAK or HEARTACHE) is a term metaphor for the intense emotional—and sometimes physical—stress or pain one feels at experiencing great longing . The concept is cross-cultural, often cited with reference to a desired or lost lover, and dates back at least 3,000 years. Emotional pain that is severe can cause 'broken heart syndrome ', including physical damage to the heart. CONTENTS * 1 Physiology * 2 Psychology * 2.1 Uncomplicated grief * 2.2 Depression * 2.3 Psychological trauma * 2.4 Posttraumatic stress disorder * 3 Medical Complications * 3.1 Broken heart syndrome * 3.2 Endocrine and immune dysfunction * 4 Cultural references * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Sources * 7.1 Printed * 7.2 Online * 8 External links PHYSIOLOGYThe emotional "pain" of a broken heart is believed to be part of the survival instinct. The "social-attachment system " uses the "pain system " to encourage humans to maintain their close social relationships by causing pain when those relationships are lost. Psychologists Geoff MacDonald of the University of Queensland and Mark Leary of Wake Forest University proposed in 2005 the evolution of common mechanisms for both physical and emotional pain responses and argue that such expressions are "more than just a metaphor"
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Compassionate Love
COMPASSIONATE LOVE, sometimes also called ALTRUISTIC LOVE, has been a topic of scientific interest and research since the 1990s. It is also closely related to the construct of unlimited love that has been expounded by Stephen G. Post . Compassionate love refers to love that "centers on the good of the other" (p. 3, Underwood, 2008 ). It is distinct from altruism, compassion, and romantic love. Since 2001, the scientific study of compassionate love has received several million dollars in research support from the Fetzer Institute and the Institute for Research on Unlimited Love (IRUL). The emergence of the term _compassionate love_ has been described by Lynn G. Underwood in a chapter in the first edited book on compassionate love research, _The Science of Compassionate Love_. The term first emerged in the context of a research meeting at the World Health Organization (WHO) for developing tools to assess quality of life to be used in diverse cultures. The group included researchers from all over the world, from both religious and nonreligious backgrounds. One of the facets of interest was loving kindness, or love for others. Underwood writes that "There was considerable discussion of the appropriate wording for this aspect. The Buddhists were not happy with the word 'love' but wanted 'compassion' to be used, which for them fit the concept
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Conjugal Love
If Wiktionary has a definition already, change this tag to {{TWCleanup2 }} or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary by replacing the text on this page with {{Wi }}. If Wiktionary does not have the definition yet, consider moving the whole article to Wiktionary by replacing this tag with the template {{Copy to Wiktionary }}. This template will no longer automatically categorize articles as candidates to move to Wiktionary
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Courtly Love
COURTLY LOVE (or _FIN\'AMOR_ in Occitan ) was a medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry . Medieval literature is filled with examples of knights setting out on adventures and performing various services for ladies because of their "courtly love". This kind of love is originally a literary fiction created for the entertainment of the nobility, but as time passed, these ideas about love changed and attracted a larger audience. In the high Middle Ages, a "game of love" developed around these ideas as a set of social practices. "Loving nobly" was considered to be an enriching and improving practice. Courtly love began in the ducal and princely courts of Aquitaine , Provence , Champagne , ducal Burgundy and the Norman Kingdom of Sicily at the end of the eleventh century. In essence, courtly love was an experience between erotic desire and spiritual attainment, "a love at once illicit and morally elevating, passionate and disciplined , humiliating and exalting, human and transcendent ". The term "courtly love" was first popularized by Gaston Paris and has since come under a wide variety of definitions and uses. Its interpretation, origins and influences continue to be a matter of critical debate
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Troubadour
A TROUBADOUR (English: /ˈtruːbədʊər/ , French: ; Occitan : _trobador_, IPA: ) was a composer and performer of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350). Since the word _troubadour_ is etymologically masculine, a female troubadour is usually called a trobairitz . The troubadour school or tradition began in the late 11th century in Occitania , but it subsequently spread into Italy and Spain . Under the influence of the troubadours, related movements sprang up throughout Europe: the Minnesang in Germany , _trovadorismo _ in Galicia and Portugal , and that of the trouvères in northern France . Dante Alighieri in his _ De vulgari eloquentia _ defined the troubadour lyric as _fictio rethorica musicaque poita_: rhetorical, musical, and poetical fiction. After the "classical" period around the turn of the 13th century and a mid-century resurgence, the art of the troubadours declined in the 14th century and eventually died out around the time of the