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Flag Of Indonesia
The Flag of Indonesia
Indonesia
is a simple bicolour with two equal horizontal bands, red (top) and white (bottom) with an overall ratio of 2:3.[1] It was introduced and hoisted in public at the Indonesian Declaration of Independence on 17 August 1945 in Pegangsaan Timur street in Jakarta, and again when the Dutch formally transferred sovereignty on 17 August 1950. The design of the flag has remained unchanged since. The flag of Indonesia
Indonesia
is graphically identical to the Flag of Monaco, with a slight difference only in the ratio of its dimensions.[2] The Naval Jack
Naval Jack
of Indonesia
Indonesia
is reserved for sole use by the Indonesian Navy. It flies from the mast of every active Indonesian war ship.[3] The design of the jack is described as nine alternating stripes of red and white
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Palm Sugar
Palm sugar
Palm sugar
is a sweetener derived from any variety of palm tree. Palm sugar is sometimes qualified by the type of palm, as in coconut palm sugar. While sugars from different palms may have slightly different compositions, all are processed similarly and can be used interchangeably.Contents1 Types 2 Production 3 Use 4 Gula melaka 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTypes[edit] The predominant sources of palm sugar are the palmyra, date, nipa, sugar and coconut palms.[1] The palmyra palm ( Borassus
Borassus
spp.) is grown in Africa, Asia, and New Guinea. The tree has many uses, such as thatching, hatmaking, timber, use as a writing material, and in food products. Palm sugar
Palm sugar
is produced from sap ('toddy') from the flowers. The date palm has two species, Phoenix dactylifera
Phoenix dactylifera
and P. sylvestris, and both are sources of palm sugar. P
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Hotel Majapahit
The Hotel
Hotel
Majapahit
Majapahit
is a historic luxury hotel in Surabaya, Indonesia. Located at 65 Jalan Tunjungan, Surabaya. The hotel was founded in 1910 as the Hotel
Hotel
Oranje by Lucas Martin Sarkies
Lucas Martin Sarkies
who commissioned Regent Alfred John Bidwell to design the hotel. The hotel opened in 1911.[1] A new art deco style lobby extension was opened in 1936
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Quranic
The Quran
Quran
(/kɔːrˈɑːn/[a] kor-AHN; Arabic: القرآن‎ al-Qurʾān,[b] literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran[c]) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God
God
(Allah).[1] It is widely
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Java War
Dutch victory; rebellion crushed Diponegoro
Diponegoro
deported to Makassar[1]Belligerents Dutch Empire Pro-Dutch Javanese Javanese rebels Chinese mercenariesCommanders and leaders Hendrik Merkus de Kock Diponegoro (POW)Units involvedTentara Republik Indonesia
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Batak People
Batak
Batak
is a collective term used to identify a number of closely related Austronesian ethnic groups predominantly found in North Sumatra, Indonesia
Indonesia
who speak Batak
Batak
languages
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Mangosteen
The purple mangosteen ( Garcinia
Garcinia
mangostana), known simply as mangosteen,[1] is a tropical evergreen tree believed to have originated in the Sunda Islands
Sunda Islands
of the Malay archipelago
Malay archipelago
and the Moluccas of Indonesia.[2] It grows mainly in Southeast Asia, southwest India
India
and other tropical areas such as Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
and Florida,[2][3][4] where the tree has been introduced
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Averrhoa Bilimbi
Averrhoa
Averrhoa
bilimbi (commonly known as bilimbi, cucumber tree, or tree sorrel[2]) is a fruit-bearing tree of the genus Averrhoa, family Oxalidaceae. It is a close relative of carambola tree.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Nutritional value for 100 g of edible portion 4 Culinary interest 5 Medical interest 6 Other uses 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDescription[edit] The bilimbi tree reaches 5–10 m in height. Its trunk is short and quickly divides up into ramifications. Bilimbi leaves, 3–6 cm long, are alternate, imparipinnate and cluster at branch extremities. There are around 11 to 37 alternate or subopposite oblong leaflets. The leaves are quite similar to those of the Otaheite gooseberry
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Diponegoro
Prince Diponegoro
Diponegoro
(born Bendara Raden Mas Mustahar; later Bendara Raden Mas Antawirya) (11 November 1785 – 8 January 1855),[1] also known as Dipanegara, was a Javanese prince who opposed the Dutch colonial rule. The eldest son of the Yogyakartan Sultan Hamengkubuwono III, he played an important role in the Java War
Java War
between 1825 and 1830
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Glossary Of Vexillology
Flag
Flag
terminology is the nomenclature, or system of terms, used in vexillology, the study of flags, to describe precisely the parts, patterns, and other attributes of flags and their display.Contents1 Flag
Flag
types 2 Flag
Flag
elements 3 Basic patterns 4 Techniques in flag display4.1 Illustrations5 Flag
Flag
identification symbols5.1 National flag
National flag
variants by use 5.2 Other symbols 5.3 In Unicode6 References 7 External links Flag
Flag
types[edit] Banderole
Banderole
or bannerol A small flag or streamer carried on the lance of a knight; or a long narrow flag flying from the mast-head of a ship. Banner Generically, a synonym for a flag of any kind
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Java
Java
Java
(Indonesian: Jawa; Javanese: ꦗꦮ; Sundanese: ᮏᮝ) is an island of Indonesia. At about 139,000 square kilometres (54,000 sq mi), the island is comparable in size to England, the U.S. State
U.S. State
of North Carolina, or Omsk Oblast. With a population of over 141 million (the island itself) or 145 million (the administrative region), Java
Java
is home to 56.7 percent of the Indonesian population and is the world's most populous island.[1] The Indonesian capital city, Jakarta, is located on western Java. Much of Indonesian history took place on Java. It was the center of powerful Hindu-Buddhist empires, the Islamic sultanates, and the core of the colonial Dutch East Indies. Java
Java
was also the center of the Indonesian struggle for independence during the 1930s and 1940s
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Jayakatwang
Jayakatwang (died 1293) was the king of short lived second Kingdom of Kediri (also known as Gelang-gelang Kingdom) of Java, after his overthrow of Kertanegara, the last king of Singhasari. He was eventually defeated by Raden Wijaya, Kertanegara's son-in-law using the troops of the Mongol Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
that were invading Java. Raden Wijaya would later turn against the Mongols
Mongols
and found Majapahit, the greatest empire in Java.Contents1 Background 2 Rebellion against Singhasari 3 Mongol invasion 4 Legacy 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Since 1271, Jayakatwang was viceroy (or governor) of Kediri,[1] a vassal state of Singhasari.[2]:199[3] Kediri was formerly the dominant kingdom in Java
Java
until overthrown in 1222 by Ken Arok, the first king of Singhasari
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Pararaton
The Pararaton, also known as the Book of Kings, is a Javanese chronicle[1]:187 in the Kawi language. The comparatively short text of 32 folio-size pages (1126 lines) contains the history of the kings of Singhasari
Singhasari
and Majapahit
Majapahit
in eastern Java. Pararaton opens with a formal incarnation of the founder of Singhasari kingdom (1222–1292), Ken Arok (or Ken Angrok).[2] Almost half of the manuscript is the story of Ken Arok's career before his accession to the throne in 1222. This part is clearly mythical in character. There then follow a number of shorter narrative fragments in chronological order. Many of the events recorded here are dated. Towards the end the pieces of history become shorter and shorter and are mixed with genealogical information concerning the members of the royal family of Majapahit. The edition of the text published by J.L.A
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Madagascar
Madagascar
Madagascar
(/ˌmædəˈɡæskər/; Malagasy: Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar
Madagascar
(Malagasy: Repoblikan'i Madagasikara [republiˈkʲan madaɡasˈkʲarə̥]; French: République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of East Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar
Madagascar
(the fourth-largest island in the world), and numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar
Madagascar
split from the Indian peninsula
Indian peninsula
around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar
Madagascar
is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth
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Tahiti
Tahiti
Tahiti
(/təˈhiːti/; French pronunciation: ​[ta.iti]; previously also known as Otaheite (obsolete) is the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia. The island is located in the archipelago of the Society Islands
Society Islands
in the central Southern Pacific Ocean, and is divided into two parts: the bigger, northwestern part, Tahiti
Tahiti
Nui, and the smaller, southeastern part, Tahiti
Tahiti
Iti. The island was formed from volcanic activity and is high and mountainous with surrounding coral reefs
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Austronesian People
The Austronesian
Austronesian
languages are a language family that is widely dispersed throughout Maritime Southeast Asia, Madagascar
Madagascar
and the islands of the Pacific Ocean, with a few members in continental Asia.[2] Austronesian
Austronesian
languages are spoken by about 386 million people (4.9%), making it the fourth-largest language family by number of speakers, behind the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
(46.3%), the Sino-Tibetan languages (20.4%), and the Niger-Congo languages
Niger-Congo languages
(6.9%). Major Austronesian
Austronesian
languages with the highest number of speakers are Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Javanese, and Filipino (Tagalog)
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