HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

FitzRoy Somerset, 4th Baron Raglan
Fitzroy Richard Somerset, 4th Baron Raglan
Baron Raglan
(10 June 1885 – 14 September 1964) was a British soldier, author, and amateur anthropologist. His books include The Hero, A Study in Tradition, Myth and Drama
Drama
and Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
Houses, with Sir Cyril Fox.Contents1 Life 2 Literary works 3 Ancestry 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] FitzRoy Richard Somerset, heir to the peerage title Baron Raglan, was born on 10 June 1885 to George Fitzroy Henry Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan and his wife Lady Ethel Jemima Ponsonby.[1] He was educated at Eton and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and received a commission as Second lieutenant in the Militia regiment the Royal Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
Royal Engineers on 10 June 1902.[2] In 1905 he entered the British Army and was commissioned in the Grenadier Guards
[...More...]

"FitzRoy Somerset, 4th Baron Raglan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Raglan Castle
Raglan Castle
Castle
(Welsh: Castell Rhaglan) is a late medieval castle located just north of the village of Raglan in the county of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
in south east Wales. The modern castle dates from between the 15th and early 17th-centuries, when the successive ruling families of the Herberts and the Somersets created a luxurious, fortified castle, complete with a large hexagonal keep, known as the Great Tower or the Yellow Tower of Gwent. Surrounded by parkland, water gardens and terraces, the castle was considered by contemporaries to be the equal of any other in England or Wales. During the English Civil War
English Civil War
the castle was held on behalf of Charles I and was taken by Parliamentary forces in 1646. In the aftermath, the castle was slighted, or deliberately put beyond military use; after the restoration of Charles II, the Somersets declined to restore the castle
[...More...]

"Raglan Castle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Perseus
In Greek mythology, Perseus
Perseus
(/ˈpɜːrsiəs, -sjuːs/; Greek: Περσεύς) is the legendary founder of Mycenae
Mycenae
and of the Perseid dynasty, who, alongside Cadmus
Cadmus
and Bellerophon, was the greatest Greek hero and slayer of monsters before the days of Heracles.[1] He beheaded the Gorgon
Gorgon
Medusa
Medusa
for Polydectes
Polydectes
and saved Andromeda from the sea monster Cetus
[...More...]

"Perseus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Church Of St John, Llandenny
The Church of St John, is the parish church of Llandenny, Monmouthshire, Wales. It is in the Perpendicular[1] style and is a Grade I listed building as of 27 November 1953.[2] History and architecture[edit] The church dates from the twelfth century, the date of the nave, [3] although the chancel is fourteenth century and the roofs and tower fifteenth century.[4] It has a well-preserved Norman window.[5] The building is of Old Red Sandstone.[3] The church was restored in 1860-65[4] by John Prichard and John Pollard Seddon[3] and again by G.E.Halliday in 1900-01. [3] The Arts and Crafts chancel rails are from this date.[4] Memorials to a number of members of the Raglan branch of the Somerset family, whose seat is nearby Cefntilla Court, can be seen in the church.[6] Services are held at the church each Sunday.[5] Notes[edit]^ "KELLY'S DIRECTORY OF MONMOUTHSHIRE, 1901". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2012-02-12.  ^ Good Stuff IT Services (1953-11-27)
[...More...]

"Church Of St John, Llandenny" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

War
War
War
is a state of armed conflict between states or societies. It is generally characterized by extreme aggression, destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Warfare refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[1] Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[2] others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[3] The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War
War
II, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests[4] at up to 60 million
[...More...]

"War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
[...More...]

"Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drama
Drama
Drama
is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance; a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.[1] Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.[2] The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia, and Melpomene
[...More...]

"Drama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oedipus
Oedipus
Oedipus
(US: /ˈiːdəpəs, ˈɛdə-/, UK: /ˈiːdəpəs/; Greek: Οἰδίπους Oidípous meaning "swollen foot") was a mythical Greek king of Thebes. A tragic hero in Greek mythology, Oedipus accidentally fulfilled a prophecy that he would end up killing his father and marrying his mother, thereby bringing disaster to his city and family. The story of Oedipus
Oedipus
is the subject of Sophocles' tragedy Oedipus
Oedipus
Rex, which was followed by Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus at Colonus
and then Antigone. Together, these plays make up Sophocles' three Theban plays
[...More...]

"Oedipus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theseus
Theseus
Theseus
(UK: /ˈθiːsjuːs/, US: /ˈθiːsiəs/; Ancient Greek: Θησεύς [tʰɛːsěu̯s]) was the mythical king and founder-hero of Athens. Like Perseus, Cadmus, or Heracles, Theseus
Theseus
battled and overcame foes that were identified with an archaic religious and social order: “This was a major cultural transition, like the making of the new Olympia by Hercules” (Ruck & Staples, p. 204).[1] Theseus
Theseus
was a founding hero for the Athenians in the same way that Heracles
Heracles
was the founding hero for the Dorians. The Athenians regarded Theseus
Theseus
as a great reformer; his name comes from the same root as θεσμός (thesmos), Greek for "The Gathering"
[...More...]

"Theseus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romulus
Romulus
Romulus
(/ˈrɒmjələs/) was the legendary founder and first king of Rome. Various traditions attribute the establishment of many of Rome's oldest legal, political, religious, and social institutions to Romulus and his contemporaries
[...More...]

"Romulus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heracles
Heracles
Heracles
(/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus[1] (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides[2] (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon[3] and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae
Heracleidae
(Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus
Commodus
and Maximian, often identified themselves
[...More...]

"Heracles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jason
Jason
Jason
(/ˈdʒeɪsən/; Greek: Ἰάσων Iásōn) was an ancient Greek mythological hero who was the leader of the Argonauts
Argonauts
whose quest for the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
featured in Greek literature. He was the son of Aeson, the rightful king of Iolcos. He was married to the sorceress Medea. He was also the great-grandson of the messenger god Hermes, through his mother's side. Jason
Jason
appeared in various literary works in the classical world of Greece and Rome, including the epic poem Argonautica
Argonautica
and the tragedy Medea
[...More...]

"Jason" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Welsh Nationalist
Welsh nationalism
Welsh nationalism
(Welsh: Cenedlaetholdeb Cymreig) emphasises the distinctiveness of Welsh language, culture, and history, and calls for more self-determination for Wales, which might include more devolved powers for the Welsh Assembly
Welsh Assembly
or full independence from the United Kingdom.Contents1 Conquest 2 Annexation 3 Revolutionary ideas 4 19th century 5 Treachery of the Blue Books 6 Influence of European nationalism 7 20th century 8 21st century8.1 Plaid Cymru 8.2 Other nationalist parties and movements 8.3 Violent nationalism9 See also 10 References 11 Sources/bibliography 12 External linksConquest[edit]The medieval kingdoms of WalesThrough most of its history before the Anglo-Norman Conquest, Wales was divided into several kingdoms
[...More...]

"Welsh Nationalist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bellerophon
Bellerophon
Bellerophon
(/bəˈlɛrəfən/; Greek: Βελλεροφῶν) or Bellerophontes (Βελλεροφόντης) is a hero of Greek mythology
[...More...]

"Bellerophon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pelops
In Greek mythology, Pelops
Pelops
(/ˈpiːlɒps, ˈpɛlɒps/; Greek: Πέλοψ), was king of Pisa in the Peloponnesus. His father, Tantalus, was the founder of the House of Atreus
Atreus
through Pelops's son of that name. He was venerated at Olympia, where his cult developed into the founding myth of the Olympic Games, the most important expression of unity, not only for the Peloponnesus, "island of Pelops", but for all Hellenes
[...More...]

"Pelops" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Asclepios
Asclepius (/æsˈkliːpiəs/; Greek: Ἀσκληπιός, Asklēpiós [asklɛːpiós]; Latin: Aesculapius) was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia ("Hygiene", the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso (the goddess of the healing process), Aglæa/Ægle (the goddess of the glow of good health), and Panacea (the goddess of universal remedy). He was associated with the Roman/Etruscan god Vediovis and the Egyptian Imhotep.[1] He was one of Apollo's sons, sharing with Apollo the epithet Paean ("the Healer").[2] The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today
[...More...]

"Asclepios" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.