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Cotonou
Cotonou (French pronunciation: ​[kɔtɔnu]; Fon: Kútɔ̀nú)[2] is the economic centre of Benin. Its official population count was 761,137 inhabitants in 2006; however, some estimates indicate its population to be as high as 2.4 million.[citation needed] The population in 1960 was only 70,000.[citation needed] The urban area continues to expand, notably toward the west. The city lies in the southeast of the country, between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Nokoué.[3] In addition to being Benin's largest city, it is the seat of government, although Porto-Novo is the official capital
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First Franco-Dahomean War
France
The First Franco-Dahomean War, which raged in 1890, was a conflict between France, led by General Alfred-Amédée Dodds, and Dahomey under King Béhanzin. The French emerged triumphant after winning the Battle of Abomey. At the close of the 19th century, European powers were busy conquering and colonizing much of Africa. In what is today Benin, the main colonial power was the French Third Republic. The French had established commercial ties with the indigenous peoples of the area including one of West Africa's most powerful states at the time, the Kingdom of Dahomey. In 1851, a Franco-Dahomean friendship treaty was ratified allowing the French to operate commercially and missionaries to enter the country.[1] By 1890, the Fon kingdom of Dahomey was at the height of its power. It laid claim to almost all the coast of modern Benin plus much of south-central Benin as far north as Atcheribé
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Ghana
Coordinates: 7°49′N 1°03′W / 7.817°N 1.050°W / 7.817; -1.050 Ghana (/ˈɡɑːnə/ (listen)), officially the Republic of Ghana, is a country along the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean, in the subregion of West Africa. Spanning a land mass of 238,535 km2 (92,099 sq mi), Ghana is bordered by the Ivory Coast in the west, Burkina Faso in the north, Togo in the east, the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean in the south
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1963 Dahomeyan Coup D'état
The 1963 Dahomeyan coup d'état was staged on October 28, 1963, by Christophe Soglo, who took control of the Republic of Dahomey to prevent a civil war. He overthrew Hubert Maga, whose presidency faced extreme economic stagnation and a host of other problems. The West African colony of French Dahomey, the present-day nation of Benin, was largely ignored by the French during its colonial era in French West Africa.[1] Dahomey had a weak economy, propelled by the lack of known natural resources. The last time the colony had a favorable trade balance was in 1924.[2] Its main export was intellectuals, and was known as the Latin Quarter of Africa due to its rich cultural landscape.[3] On August 1, 1960, Dahomey gained its independence and prominent politician Hubert Maga was chosen as its first president.[4] At the time, Dahomey was also facing a major economic recession
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Fetish Priest
In Ghana, Togo, Benin and other countries of West Africa, a fetish priest is a person who serves as a mediator between the spirit and the living.[1][2][3] Fetish priests usually live and worship their gods in enclosed places, called a fetish shrine. The fetish shrine is a simple mud hut with some kind of enclosure or fence around it. The priest or priestess performs rituals to consult and seek the favor from his gods in the shrine. The rituals are performed with money, liquor, animals, and in some places, human sex slaves called trokosi, fiashidi, or woryokwe. The priest is usually chosen through "spiritual nomination of the shrine" through divination.[4][5] They are most at times believed to help people in spiritual matters and physical needs (riches, good fortunes, marriage, traveling mercies, deliverance) in people's life
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