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Fishing
Fishing
Fishing
is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish
Fish
are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. Fishing
Fishing
may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms
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Prince Consort
A prince consort is the husband of a queen regnant who is not himself a king in his own right. In recognition of his status, a prince consort may be given a formal title, such as Prince
Prince
or Prince
Prince
Consort, with Prince
Prince
being the most common. However, most monarchies do not have formal rules on the styling of princes consort, thus they may have no special title. Few monarchies use the title of King
King
Consort.Contents1 Usage in Europe 2 Usage in imperial China 3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage in Europe[edit] Prince
Prince
Consort (capitalized) is a formal title, and Prince
Prince
Albert is the only spouse of a British queen to have held it. The title was awarded to him in 1857 by his wife, Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
(reigned 1837–1901)
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Aquatic Animal
An aquatic animal is an animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, which lives in the water for most or all of its lifetime.[1] Many insects such as mosquitoes, mayflies, dragonflies and caddisflies have aquatic larvae, with winged adults. Aquatic animals may breathe air or extract oxygen that dissolved in water through specialised organs called gills, or directly through the skin. Natural environments and the animals that live in them can be categorized as aquatic (water) or terrestrial (land). The term aquatic can be applied to animals that live in either fresh water (fresh water animals) or salt water (marine animals). However, the adjective marine is most commonly used for animals that live in saltwater, i.e. in oceans, seas, etc. Aquatic animals (especially freshwater animals) are often of special concern to conservationists because of the fragility of their environments
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Aquatic Mammal
Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals are a diverse group of mammals that dwell partly or entirely in bodies of water. They include the various marine mammals who dwell in oceans, as well as various freshwater species, such as the European otter. They are not a taxon and are not unified by any distinct biological grouping, but rather their dependence on and integral relation to aquatic ecosystems. The level of dependence on aquatic life are vastly different among species, with the Amazonian manatee
Amazonian manatee
and river dolphins being completely aquatic and fully dependent on aquatic ecosystems; whereas the Baikal seal
Baikal seal
feeds underwater but rests, molts, and breeds on land; and the capybara and hippopotamus are able to venture in and out of water in search of food. Mammal
Mammal
adaptation to an aquatic lifestyle vary considerably between species
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Cave Painting
Cave
Cave
paintings are also known as "parietal art". They are painted drawings on cave walls or ceilings, mainly of prehistoric origin, dated to some 40,000 years ago (around 38,000 BCE) in Eurasia. The exact purpose of the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
cave paintings is not known. Evidence suggests that they were not merely decorations of living areas since the caves in which they have been found do not have signs of ongoing habitation. They are also often located in areas of caves that are not easily accessible. Some theories hold that cave paintings may have been a way of communicating with others, while other theories ascribe a religious or ceremonial purpose to them. The paintings are remarkably similar around the world, with animals being common subjects that give the most impressive images
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Echinoderm
Homalozoa
Homalozoa
† Gill & Caster, 1960 Homostelea
Homostelea
† Homoiostelea † Stylophora
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Crustacean
Thylacocephala? † BranchiopodaPhyllopoda SarsostracaRemipedia Cephalocarida MaxillopodaThecostraca Tantulocarida Branchiura Pentastomida Mystacocarida CopepodaOstracodaMyodocopa PodocopaMalacostracaPhyllocarida Hoplocarida EumalacostracaCladistically included but traditionally excluded groupsHexapodsCrustaceans (Crustacea /krʌˈsteɪʃə/) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimp, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.[1] The crustacean group is usually treated as a subphylum, and thanks to recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.[2] Some crustaceans are more closely related to insects and other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans. The 67,000 described species range in size from
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Midden
A midden (also kitchen midden or shell heap; from early Scandinavian; Danish: mødding, Swedish regional: mödding)[1] is an old dump for domestic waste[2] which may consist of animal bone, human excrement, botanical material, mollusc shells, sherds, lithics (especially debitage), and other artifacts and ecofacts associated with past human occupation. The word is of Scandinavian via Middle English
Middle English
derivation, and is today used by archaeologists worldwide to describe any kind of feature containing waste products relating to day-to-day human life. They may be convenient, single-use pits created by nomadic groups or long-term, designated dumps used by sedentary communities that accumulate over several generations. These features, therefore, provide a useful resource for archaeologists who wish to study the diet and habits of past societies
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Archaeological
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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South Devon
South Devon
Devon
is the southern part of Devon, England. Because Devon
Devon
has its major population centres on its two coasts, the county is divided informally into North Devon
Devon
and South Devon.[1] In a narrower sense "South Devon" is used to refer to the part of Devon
Devon
south of Exeter and Dartmoor, including Plymouth, Torbay
Torbay
and the districts of South Hams, West Devon
Devon
and Teignbridge. South Devon
Devon
is also sometimes, although incorrectly, taken to include East Devon, which includes the first seaside resort to be developed in the county, Exmouth and the more upmarket Georgian town of Sidmouth, headquarters of the East Devon
Devon
District Council
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Food And Agriculture Organization
The Food and Agriculture
Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations
United Nations
(FAO; French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture, Italian: Organizzazione delle Nazioni Unite per l'Alimentazione e l'Agricoltura) is a specialised agency of the United Nations that leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations meet as equals to negotiate arguments and debate policy. FAO is also a source of knowledge and information, and helps developing countries in transition modernize and improve agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices, ensuring good nutrition and food security for all. Its Latin
Latin
motto, fiat panis, translates as "let there be bread"
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National Maritime Museum
2,367,904 (2009)[1]Ranked 12th nationallyDirector Kevin Fewster, AM, FRSAPublic transit access Cutty Sark GreenwichWebsite rmg.co.ukArea 200 acres (0.81 km2)The National Maritime Museum
National Maritime Museum
(NMM) in Greenwich, London, is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom and may be the largest museum of its kind in the world. The historic buildings form part of the Maritime Greenwich
Greenwich
World Heritage Site, and it also incorporates the Royal Observatory and 17th-century Queen's House. In 2012, Her Majesty the Queen formally approved Royal Museums Greenwich
Greenwich
as the new overall title for the National Maritime Museum, Queen’s House, the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and the Cutty Sark. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport
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Tianyuan Man
Tianyuan man (Chinese: t 田園洞人, s 田园洞人, p Tiányuándòng Rén) are the remains of one of the earliest modern humans to inhabit eastern Asia
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Kingston Upon Hull
Kingston upon Hull, usually abbreviated to Hull, is a city and unitary authority in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.[2] It lies upon the River Hull
River Hull
at its confluence with the Humber
Humber
Estuary, 25 miles (40 km) inland from the North Sea,[2] with a population of 260,200 (mid-2016 est.). The town of Hull was founded late in the 12th century. The monks of Meaux Abbey
Meaux Abbey
needed a port where the wool from their estates could be exported
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Harwich
Harwich
Harwich
/ˈhærɪtʃ/ is a town in Essex, England
England
and one of the Haven ports, located on the coast with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east. It is in the Tendring
Tendring
district. Nearby places include Felixstowe
Felixstowe
to the northeast, Ipswich
Ipswich
to the northwest, Colchester
Colchester
to the southwest and Clacton-on-Sea
Clacton-on-Sea
to the south. It is the northernmost coastal town within Essex. Its position on the estuaries of the Stour and Orwell rivers and its usefulness to mariners as the only safe anchorage between the Thames and the Humber
Humber
led to a long period of maritime significance, both civil and military
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Act Of Parliament
Acts of Parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature).[1] Act of the Oireachtas
Act of the Oireachtas
is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
where the legislature is commonly known by its Iri
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