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First Peter
The First Epistle
Epistle
of Peter, usually referred to simply as First Peter and often written 1 Peter, is a book of the New Testament. The author presents himself as Peter the Apostle, and, following Roman Catholic tradition, the epistle has been held to have been written during his time as bishop of Rome or Bishop
Bishop
of Antioch, though neither title is used in the epistle. The text of the letter states that it was written from Babylon. The letter is addressed to various churches in Asia Minor suffering religious persecution.Contents1 Authorship 2 Audience 3 Outline 4 Context4.1 Social discrimination of Christians 4.2 Official persecution of Christians5 The Harrowing of Hell 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksAuthorship[edit] Main article: Authorship of the Petrine epistles The authorship of 1 Peter has traditionally been attributed to the Apostle Peter because it bears his name and identifies him as its author (1:1)
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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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Paul The Apostle
Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
(Latin: Paulus; Greek: Παῦλος, translit. Paulos, Coptic: ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲟⲥ; c. 5 – c. 67), commonly known as Saint
Saint
Paul and also known by his Jewish name Saul of Tarsus (Hebrew: שאול התרסי‎, translit. Sha'ul ha-Tarsi; Greek: Σαῦλος Ταρσεύς, translit. Saulos Tarseus),[4][5][6] was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of the Christ
Christ
to the first century world.[7] Paul is generally considered one of the most important figures of the Apostolic Age[8][9] and in the mid-30s to the mid-50s AD he founded several churches in Asia Minor and Europe. He took advantage of his status as both a Jew
Jew
and a Roman citizen
Roman citizen
to minister to both Jewish and Roman audiences
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Apocalypse
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Apocalypse
Apocalypse
depicted in Christian Orthodox traditional fresco scenes in Osogovo Monastery, Republic of MacedoniaSt. John at Patmos: the receiving of an apocalyptic visionAn apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering"[1]) is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation
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Book Of Revelation
The Book
Book
of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book of the New Testament that occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation" (before title pages and titles, books were commonly known by their first words, as is also the case of the Hebrew Five Books of Moses
Five Books of Moses
(Torah)). The Book
Book
of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament
New Testament
canon (although there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles).[a] The author names himself in the text as "John", but his precise identity remains a point of academic debate
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New Testament Manuscript
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eA biblical manuscript is any handwritten copy of a portion of the text of the Bible. The word Bible
Bible
comes from the Greek biblia (books); manuscript comes from Latin
Latin
manu (hand) and scriptum (written). Biblical manuscripts vary in size from tiny scrolls containing individual verses of the Jewish scriptures (see Tefillin) to huge polyglot codices (multi-lingual books) containing both the Hebrew Bible
Bible
(Tanakh) and the New Testament, as well as extracanonical works. The study of biblical manuscripts is important because handwritten copies of books can contain errors
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Bishop
A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Moravian, Anglican, Old Catholic
Catholic
and Independent Catholic
Catholic
churches, as well as the Assyrian Church of the East, bishops claim apostolic succession, a direct historical lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. Within these churches, bishops are seen as those who possess the full priesthood and can ordain clergy, including other bishops. Some Protestant
Protestant
churches, including the Lutheran
Lutheran
and Methodist
Methodist
churches, have bishops serving similar functions as well, though not always understood to be within apostolic succession in the same way
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Diocese Of Rome
The Diocese
Diocese
of Rome
Rome
(Latin: Dioecesis Urbis seu Romana,[2] Italian: Diocesi di Roma) is a diocese of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Rome. The Bishop
Bishop
of Rome
Rome
is the Pope, the Supreme Pontiff and head of the Catholic Church. As the Holy See, the papacy is a sovereign entity with diplomatic relations,[3] and civil jurisdiction over the Vatican City State located geographically within Rome. The Diocese
Diocese
of Rome
Rome
is the metropolitan diocese of the Province of Rome, an ecclesiastical province in Italy. The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that the first Bishop of Rome
Rome
was Saint Peter
Saint Peter
in the first century
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Bishop Of Antioch
Patriarch of Antioch
Patriarch of Antioch
is a traditional title held by the Bishop
Bishop
of Antioch. As the traditional "overseer" (ἐπίσκοπος, episkopos, from which the word bishop is derived) of the first gentile Christian
Christian
community, the position has been of prime importance in the church from its earliest period. This diocese is one of the few for which the names of its bishops from the apostolic beginnings have been preserved. Today five churches use the title of Patriarch of Antioch: the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Syriac Catholic Church, the Melkite
Melkite
Greek Catholic Church, and the Maronite
Maronite
Church. Historically, there has also been a Latin Patriarch of Antioch. According to church tradition, this ancient Patriarchate
Patriarchate
was founded by the Apostle Saint Peter
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Authorship Of The Petrine Epistles
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe authorship of the Petrine epistles (First and Second Peter) is an important question in biblical criticism, parallel to that of the authorship
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Graham Stanton
Graham Norman Stanton (9 July 1940 – 18 July 2009) was a New Zealander who became a prominent and widely respected New Testament scholar in a teaching career at King's College London and as Lady Margaret's Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University. Stanton's special interests were in the Gospels, with a particular focus on Matthew's Gospel; Paul's letters, with a particular focus on Galatians; and second century Christian writings, with a particular interest in Justin Martyr.Contents1 Biography 2 Criticism of the Christ myth theory 3 Books 4 Edited works 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Stanton came to Cambridge in 1966 to study under Professor C.F.D. Moule (at Westminster College and as a member of Fitzwilliam College), his dissertation was completed in 1969 and published in 1974. From 1970-1998 he served as lecturer and (from 1977) as Professor of New Testament at King's College, London
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Pauline Epistles
The Pauline epistles, Epistles of Paul, or Letters of Paul, are the 13 New Testament
New Testament
books which have the name Paul (Παῦλος) as the first word, hence claiming authorship by Paul the Apostle. Among these letters are some of the earliest extant Christian documents. They provide an insight into the beliefs and controversies of early Christianity and as part of the canon of the New Testament
New Testament
they are foundational texts for both Christian theology
Christian theology
and ethics
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Ephesians
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Ephesians, also called the Letter to the Ephesians and often shortened to Ephesians, is the tenth book of the New Testament. Its authorship has traditionally been attributed to Paul the Apostle but, starting in 1792, this has been challenged as Deutero-Pauline, that is, written in Paul's name by a later author strongly influenced by Paul's thought.[1][2][3][4][5][6]Contents1 Themes 2 Composition2.1 Authorship 2.2 Place, date, and purpose of the writing of the letter3 Outline 4 Founding of the church at Ephesus 5 Purpose 6 Interpretations 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksThemes[edit] The main theme of Ephesians is "the Church, which is the Body of Christ."As a prisoner for the Lord, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love
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Third Epistle Of John
The Third Epistle
Epistle
of John, often referred to as Third John and written 3 John or III John, is the antepenultimate book of the New Testament and attributed to John the Evangelist, traditionally thought to be the author of the Gospel
Gospel
of John and the other two epistles of John. The Third Epistle
Epistle
of John is a private letter composed to a man named Gaius, recommending to him a group of Christians led by Demetrius, which had come to preach the gospel in the area where Gaius lived
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Colossians
The Epistle
Epistle
of Paul to the Colossians, usually referred to simply as Colossians, is the twelfth book of the New Testament
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Pastoral Epistles
The pastoral epistles are three books of the canonical New Testament: the First Epistle
Epistle
to Timothy (1 Timothy) the Second Epistle
Epistle
to Timothy (2 Timothy), and the Epistle
Epistle
to Titus. They are presented as letters from Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
to Timothy and to Titus. They are generally discussed as a group (sometimes with the addition of the Epistle
Epistle
to Philemon) and are given the title pastoral because they are addressed to individuals with pastoral oversight of churches and discuss issues of Christian living, doctrine and leadership. The term "pastorals" was popularized in 1703 by D. N
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