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First Amendment To The United States Constitution
The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was originally proposed to assuage Anti-Federalist opposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted more narrowly than they are today. Beginning with Gitlow v. New York
Gitlow v. New York
(1925), the Supreme Court applied the First Amendment to states—a process known as incorporation—through the Due Process Clause
Due Process Clause
of the Fourteenth Amendment. In
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Book
As a physical object, a book is a stack of usually rectangular pages (made of papyrus, parchment, vellum, or paper) oriented with one edge tied, sewn, or otherwise fixed together and then bound to the flexible spine of a protective cover of heavier, relatively inflexible material.[1] The technical term for this physical arrangement is codex (in the plural, codices). In the history of hand-held physical supports for extended written compositions or records, the codex replaces its immediate predecessor, the scroll. A single sheet in a codex is a leaf, and each side of a leaf is a page. As an intellectual object, a book is prototypically a composition of such great length that it takes a considerable investment of time to compose and a still considerable, though not so extensive, investment of time to read. This sense of book has a restricted and an unrestricted sense
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Republicanism In The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Federalism In The United States
Federalism
Federalism
in the United States
United States
is the constitutional relationship between U.S. state
U.S. state
governments and the federal government of the United States. Since the founding of the country, and particularly with the end of the American Civil War, power shifted away from the states and towards the national government
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First Amendment (other)
The First Amendment or Amendment One/1 may refer to the:First Amendment to the United States Constitution, regarding freedom of speech, freedom of the press, religious freedom, freedom of assembly, and right to petition Australian Constitution Alteration (Senate Elections) Act, 1906, the first amendment to the Australian constitution First Amendment of the Constitution of India, which amended several of the Fundamental Rights in India First Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland, passed during World War II, concerning the declaration of a national emergency First Amendment to the Constitution of Pakistan, which accounted for the secession of Bangladesh First Amendment of the Constitution of South Africa, which made three technical changes North Carolina Amendment 1, making marriage between one man and one woman the only domestic legal unionThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title First Amendment. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to
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Constitutional Convention (United States)
The Constitutional Convention[1]:31 (also known as the Philadelphia Convention,[1]:31 the Federal Convention,[1]:31 or the Grand Convention at Philadelphia[2][3]) took place from May 25 to September 17, 1787, in the old Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House (later known as Independence Hall
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Titles Of Nobility Amendment
The Titles of Nobility Amendment
Titles of Nobility Amendment
is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution. The 11th Congress passed it on May 1, 1810, and submitted to the state legislatures for ratification. It would strip United States
United States
citizenship from any citizen who accepted a title of nobility from an "emperor, king, prince or foreign power." On two occasions between 1812 and 1816 it was within two states of the number needed to become part of the Constitution. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the amendment is still pending before the states
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Twentieth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twentieth Amendment (Amendment XX) to the United States Constitution moved the beginning and ending of the terms of the president and vice president from March 4 to January 20, and of members of Congress from March 4 to January 3. It also has provisions that determine what is to be done when there is no president-elect. The Twentieth Amendment was adopted on January 23, 1933.[1]Contents1 Text 2 Historical background 3 Proposal and ratification 4 Effect of the amendment 5 References 6 External linksText[edit]Section 1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin. Section 2
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Twenty-second Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twenty-second Amendment (Amendment XXII) of the United States Constitution sets a limit on the number of times a person is eligible for election to the office of President of the United States, and also sets additional eligibility conditions for presidents who succeed to the unexpired terms of their predecessors.[1] Congress approved the amendment on March 24, 1947, and submitted it to the state legislatures for ratification. That process was completed on February 27, 1951, after the amendment had been ratified by the requisite 36 of the then-48 states (as neither Alaska nor Hawaii had yet been admitted as states), and its provisions came into force on that date.Contents1 Text 2 Background 3 Proposal and ratification3.1 Proposal in Congress 3.2 Ratification by the states4 Affected individuals 5 Interaction with the Twelfth Amendment 6 Attempts at repeal 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksText[edit]Section 1
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Twenty-fifth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twenty-fifth Amendment (Amendment XXV) to the United States Constitution deals with succession to the Presidency and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the Vice President as well as responding to Presidential disabilities
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Twenty-seventh Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twenty-seventh Amendment (Amendment XXVII) to the United States Constitution prohibits any law that increases or decreases the salary of members of Congress from taking effect until the start of the next set of terms of office for Representatives. It is the most recent amendment to be adopted, but one of the first proposed. It was submitted by Congress to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789, along with eleven other proposed amendments. While ten of these twelve proposals were ratified in 1791 to become the Bill of Rights, what would become the Twenty-seventh Amendment and the proposed Congressional Apportionment Amendment
Congressional Apportionment Amendment
did not get ratified by enough states for them to also come into force with the first ten amendments
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Congressional Apportionment Amendment
The Congressional Apportionment Amendment
Congressional Apportionment Amendment
(originally titled Article the First) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution, one of twelve proposed amendments to the United States Constitution approved by the 1st Congress on September 25, 1789, and sent to the legislatures of the several states for ratification. Congress did not set a time limit for its ratification, so the Congressional Apportionment Amendment is still technically pending before the states. Ratification by an additional 27 states is necessary for this amendment to be adopted. If adopted, it would establish a formula for determining the appropriate size of the House of Representatives following each constitutionally mandated decennial census
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Equal Rights Amendment
The Equal Rights Amendment
Equal Rights Amendment
(ERA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution designed to guarantee equal rights for all citizens regardless of sex; it seeks to end the legal distinctions between men and women in terms of divorce, property, employment, and other matters.[1] The ERA was originally written by Alice Paul
Alice Paul
and Crystal Eastman. The amendment was introduced in Congress for the first time in 1921 and has prompted conversations about the meaning of equality for women and men. In the early history of the Equal Rights Amendment, middle-class women were largely supportive, while those speaking for the working class were often opposed, pointing out that employed women needed special protections regarding working conditions and employment hours
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Corwin Amendment
The Corwin Amendment
Corwin Amendment
is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that would shield "domestic institutions" of the states (which in 1861 included slavery) from the constitutional amendment process and from abolition or interference by Congress. It passed Congress but was never ratified by the states and never took effect.[1][2] One month after the initial Confederacy was formed, the amendment was passed by the 36th Congress on March 2, 1861, and submitted to the state legislatures for ratification. Senator William H
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Child Labor Amendment
The Child Labor Amendment
Child Labor Amendment
is a proposed and still-pending amendment to the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
that would specifically authorize Congress to regulate "labor of persons under eighteen years of age". The amendment was proposed in 1924 following Supreme Court rulings in 1918 and 1922 that federal laws regulating and taxing goods produced by employees under the ages of 14 and 16 were unconstitutional. The majority of the state governments ratified the amendment by the mid-1930s; however, it has not been ratified by the requisite three-fourths of the states according to Article V of the Constitution and none has ratified it since 1937
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Twelfth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Twelfth Amendment (Amendment XII) to the United States Constitution provides the procedure for electing the President and Vice President. It replaced the procedure provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3, by which the Electoral College originally functioned. Problems with the original procedure arose in the elections of 1796 and 1800. The Twelfth Amendment refined the process whereby a President and a Vice President are elected by the Electoral College
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