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Firetrack
Firetrack
Firetrack
is a vertically scrolling shoot 'em up computer game programmed by Nick "Orlando" Pelling and released for the BBC Micro and Commodore 64
Commodore 64
platforms in 1987 by Electric Dreams Software. It was also ported to the Acorn Electron
Acorn Electron
by Superior Software
Superior Software
in 1989 as part of the Play It Again Sam 7 compilation.[1] It resembles the 1984 arcade game Star Force
Star Force
in style and gameplay. The game was technically advanced and very well received by critics.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Development 3 Critical reception 4 ReferencesGameplay[edit] Firetrack
Firetrack
on the BBC micro
BBC micro
showing landscape, explosions and enemies, with player ship to lower leftThe player controls a fighter ship which flies at constant speed and heading over a series of worlds
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Video Game Developer
A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games.[1][2] A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks[3] to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support.[4] Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.[5] A developer may specialize in a certain video game console (such as Nintendo's Nintendo
Nintendo
Switch, Microsoft's Xbox One, Sony's PlayStation 4), or may develop for a number of systems (including personal computers and mobile devices).[citation needed] Video-game developers specialize in certain types of games (such as role-playing video games or first-person shooters)
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BBC Micro
16–32 KiB (Model A/B) 64–128 KiB (Model B+) 128 KiB (Master) Plus 32–128 KB ROM, expandable to 272 KiBStorage100–800 KB (DFS) 160–1280 KB (ADFS floppy disks) 20 MB (ADFS hard disk)Display PAL/NTSC, UHF/composite/TTL RGBGraphics640×256, 8 colours (various framebuffer modes) 78×75, 8 colours (Teletext)Sound Texas Instruments
Texas Instruments
SN76489, 4 channels, mono
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Barbarian
A barbarian is a human who is perceived to be either uncivilized or primitive. The designation is usually applied as generalization based on a popular stereotype; barbarians can be any member of a nation judged by some to be less civilized or orderly (such as a tribal society), but may also be part of a certain "primitive" cultural group (such as nomads) or social class (such as bandits) both within and outside one's own nation. Alternatively, they may instead be admired and romanticised as noble savages
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Spycat
SpyCat is a comic strip appearing in Weekly World News created by Dick Siegel and drawn by Ernie Colón.[1] Overview[edit] SpyCat speaks nine different languages ranging from Persian to "dog" and is armed with "Adamwestium" claws and deadly cat o' nine tails. He writes free-form poetry when not waging war on America's enemies at home and abroad. He is assisted in his campaign by his late ward SpyKitten, WarDog, a super-powered Afghan that came in from the Cold War and Schwarzenegger, a parrot that lays explosive eggs. References[edit]^ Google BooksThis comic strip–related article is a stub
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Revs (video Game)
Revs is a 1984 Formula Three
Formula Three
simulation written initially for the BBC Micro by Geoff Crammond and published by Acornsoft
Acornsoft
that is notable for its realistic simulation of the sport and as a precursor to its author's later work on Formula One Grand Prix and its sequels.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Tracks2 Reception 3 Legacy3.1 Enhanced release 3.2 Ports4 References 5 External linksGameplay[edit]Player wing settingsUnlike most contemporaneous racing games, Revs features selection of aerodynamic settings by the player and a full three-dimensional environment. The player is allowed to drive the wrong way around the track or even away from it completely. Unusual for the time, the track and terrain are not planar, but undulations in the ground are reproduced
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Elite (video Game)
Elite
Elite
is a space trading video game, written and developed by David Braben and Ian Bell and originally published by Acornsoft
Acornsoft
for the
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Zany Kong Junior
Killer Gorilla
Gorilla
is a clone of Donkey Kong written by Adrian Stephens and originally published by Micro Power
Micro Power
for the BBC Micro
BBC Micro
in 1983 and ported to the Acorn Electron
Acorn Electron
and Amstrad CPC
Amstrad CPC
computers in 1984. Stephens wrote Killer Gorilla
Gorilla
at the age of 17 after buying a magazine that had screenshots of Donkey Kong, and that made him feel like doing something similar.[1] He was paid 400 pounds for the game.[2] Stephens wrote two other games for Micro Power: Escape From Moonbase Alpha and Mr EE, a clone of Universal's Mr. Do!.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Scoring system 3 Compilations and sequel 4 References 5 External linksGameplay[edit]Screenshot of the 75m level (BBC Micro)The game involves controlling a man to reach a fair-haired heiress trapped by a large gorilla at the top of the screen
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Hunchback (video Game)
Century Electronics Ocean SoftwarePlatform(s) Arcade (original) Acorn Electron, Amstrad CPC, Atari 8-bit, BBC Micro, Commodore 64, VIC-20, Dragon 32, Oric, MSX, ZX SpectrumRelease Arcade version 1983Genre(s) PlatformCabinet UprightDisplay Vertical, Raster, standard resolutionHunchback is an arcade game developed by Century Electronics in 1983. The game is based on the Victor Hugo
Victor Hugo
novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame and the player controls Quasimodo. The game is set on a castle wall. The player must cross the screen from left to right avoiding obstacles in order to ring the bell at the far right. Obstacles include pits which must be swung over on a long rope, ramparts which must be jumped (some of which contain knights with spears) and flying fireballs and arrows (to be ducked or jumped). To impose a time limit on each screen a knight climbs the wall, costing the player a life should he reach the top
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Electron User
Electron User
Electron User
was a magazine targeted at owners of the Acorn Electron microcomputer. It was published by Database Publications of Stockport, starting in October 1983 and ending after 82 issues in July 1990. Initially it was included as a 16-page pullout supplement to The Micro User but after four such editions it became a standalone title and within a year had grown to an average length of around 64 pages. The focus was news stories, type-in programs and software reviews
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Zzap!64
Zzap!64
Zzap!64
was a computer games magazine covering games on the Commodore International series of computers, especially the Commodore 64
Commodore 64
(C64). It was published in the UK by Newsfield Publications Ltd and later by Europress Impact. The magazine launched in April, with the cover date May 1985,[8] as the sister magazine to CRASH. It focused on the C64 for much of its shelf life, but later incorporated Amiga
Amiga
game news and reviews. Like CRASH for the ZX Spectrum, it had a dedicated cult following amongst C64 owners and was well known for its irreverent sense of humour as well as its extensive, detailed coverage of the C64 scene
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Double Buffered
In computer science, multiple buffering is the use of more than one buffer to hold a block of data, so that a "reader" will see a complete (though perhaps old) version of the data, rather than a partially updated version of the data being created by a "writer". It also is used to avoid the need to use dual-ported RAM (DPRAM) when the readers and writers are different devices.Contents1 Description1.1 Double buffering Petri net2 Double buffering in computer graphics2.1 Page flipping3 Triple buffering 4 Quad buffering 5 Double buffering for DMA 6 Other uses 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksDescription[edit] An easy way to explain how multiple buffering works is to take a real-world example. It is a nice sunny day and you have decided to get the paddling pool out, only you can not find your garden hose. You'll have to fill the pool with buckets
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Sideways Address Space
The "Sideways" address space on the Acorn BBC Microcomputer, Electron and Master-series microcomputer was Acorn's bank switching implementation, providing for permanent system expansion in the days before hard disk drives or even floppy disk drives were commonplace. filing systems, application and utility software and drivers were made available as Sideways ROMs, and extra RAM could be fitted via the Sideways address space. The Advanced User Guide to the BBC Micro only refers to the Sideways address space as "Paged ROMs" because it predated the use of this address space for RAM expansion. The BBC B+, B+ 128 and BBC Master all featured Sideways RAM as standard.Contents1 Sideways address space 2 Sideways model 3 Sideways RAM 4 Sideways expansion 5 References 6 External linksSideways address space[edit] Main article: BBC Micro The machines used the 8-bit 6502 and 65C102 processors with a 16-bit address space
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Power-up
In video games, power-ups are objects that instantly benefit or add extra abilities to the game character as a game mechanic.[1] This is in contrast to an item, which may or may not have a benefit and can be used at a time chosen by the player. Although often collected directly through touch, power-ups can sometimes only be gained by collecting several related items, such as the floating letters of the word 'EXTEND' in Bubble Bobble. Well known examples of power-ups that have entered popular culture include the power pellets from Pac-Man[2] (regarded as the first power-up)[3] and the Super Mushroom from Super Mario Bros., which ranked first in UGO Networks' Top 11 Video Game Powerups.[4] Items that confer power-ups are usually pre-placed in the game world, spawned randomly, dropped by beaten enemies or picked up from opened or smashed containers
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Tempest (arcade Game)
Tempest is a 1981 arcade game by Atari
Atari
Inc., designed and programmed by Dave Theurer. It takes place on a three-dimensional surface, sometimes wrapped into a tube, which is viewed from one end and is divided into a dozen or more segments or lanes. The player controls a claw-shaped spaceship (named Blaster) that crawls along the near edge of the playfield, moving from segment to segment. Tempest was one of[vague] the first games to use Atari's Color- QuadraScan
QuadraScan
vector display technology. It was also the first game to allow the player to choose their starting level[citation needed] (a system Atari
Atari
dubbed "SkillStep"). This feature increases the maximum starting level depending on the player's performance in the previous game, essentially allowing the player to continue
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Star Force
Star Force
Star Force
(スターフォース, Sutā Fōsu), released in North America by Video Ware in the arcades as Mega Force, is a vertically scrolling shooter released in 1984 by Tehkan.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Legacy2.1 Sequels 2.2 Ports and related releases3 References 4 External linksGameplay[edit] In the game, the player pilots a starship called the Final Star, while shooting various enemies and destroying enemy structures for points. Unlike later vertical scrolling shooters, like Toaplan's Twin Cobra, the Final Star had only two levels of weapon power, and no secondary weapons like missiles and/or bombs. Each stage in the game was named after a letter of the Greek alphabet
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