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Fingerstyle
Fingerstyle guitar
Fingerstyle guitar
is the technique of playing the guitar by plucking the strings directly with the fingertips, fingernails, or picks attached to fingers, as opposed to flatpicking (plucking individual notes with a single plectrum, commonly called a "pick"). The term "fingerstyle" is something of a misnomer, since it is present in several different genres and styles of music—but mostly, because it involves a completely different technique, not just a "style" of playing, especially for the guitarist's picking/plucking hand. The term is often used synonymously with fingerpicking, although fingerpicking can also refer to a specific tradition of folk, blues and country guitar playing in the US
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Flamenco Guitar
A flamenco guitar is a guitar similar to a classical guitar but with thinner tops and less internal bracing. It is used in toque, the guitar-playing part of the art of flamenco.Contents1 History 2 Construction2.1 Materials 2.2 Sound3 Techniques 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Traditionally, luthiers made guitars to sell at a wide ranges of prices, largely based on the materials used and the amount of decorations, to cater to the popularity of the instrument across all classes of people in Spain.[1] The cheapest guitars were often simple, basic instruments made from the less expensive woods such as cypress. Antonio de Torres, one of the most renowned luthiers, did not differentiate between flamenco and classical guitars
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Lute
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(early lutes) Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(modern lutes)Related instrumentsListAngélique Archlute Balalaika Barbat Bağlama Biwa Bouzouki Charango Chitarra Italiana Cobza Dombra Domra Dutar Guitar Kobza Komuz Kopuz Laouto Mandocello Mandola Mandolin Mandolute Oud Pandura Pipa Tambur Tanbur Tembûr Theorbo Tiorbino TopshurA lute (/luːt/, or /ljuːt/)[1] is any plucked string instrument with a neck (either fretted or unfretted) and a deep round back enclosing a hollow cavity, usually with a sound hole or opening in the body. More specifically, the term "lute" can refer to an instrument from the family of European lutes. The term also refers generally to any string instrument having the strings running in a plane parallel to the sound table (in the Hornbostel–Sachs system)
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Double Stop
In music, a double stop refers to the technique of playing two notes simultaneously on a bowed stringed instrument such as a violin, a viola, a cello, or a double bass. In performing a double stop, two separate strings are bowed or plucked simultaneously. Although the term itself suggests these strings are to be fingered (stopped), in practice one or both strings may be open. A triple stop is the same technique applied to three strings; a quadruple stop applies to four strings. Double, triple, and quadruple stopping are collectively known as multiple stopping.Eine kleine Nachtmusik – 1. AllegroPerformed by the Advent Chamber Orchestra. Notice the triple stop in the Violins at the first chord.Problems playing this file? See media help.Early extensive examples of the double-stop and string chords appear in Carlo Farina's Capriccio Stravagante from 1627, and in certain of the sonatas of Biagio Marini's op
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Polyphonically
In music, polyphony is one type of musical texture, where a texture is, generally speaking, the way that melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic aspects of a musical composition are combined to shape the overall sound and quality of the work. In particular, polyphony consists of two or more simultaneous lines of independent melody, as opposed to a musical texture with just one voice, monophony, or a texture with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords, which is called homophony. Within the context of the Western musical tradition, the term polyphony is usually used to refer to music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Baroque forms such as fugue, which might be called polyphonic, are usually described instead as contrapuntal
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Harmony
In music, harmony considers the process by which the composition of individual sounds, or superpositions of sounds, is analysed by hearing. Usually, this means simultaneously occurring frequencies, pitches (tones, notes), or chords.[1] The study of harmony involves chords and their construction and chord progressions and the principles of connection that govern them.[2] Harmony
Harmony
is often said to refer to the "vertical" aspect of music, as distinguished from melodic line, or the "horizontal" aspect.[3] Counterpoint, which refers to the relationship between melodic lines, and polyphony, which refers to the simultaneous sounding of separate independent voices, are thus sometimes distinguished from harmony. In popular and jazz harmony, chords are named by their root plus various terms and characters indicating their qualities. In many types of music, notably baroque, romantic, modern, and jazz, chords are often augmented with "tensions"
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Bass (sound)
Bass describes tones of low (also called "deep") frequency, pitch and range from 16-256 Hz (C0 to middle C4). In musical compositions, such as songs and pieces, these are the lowest parts of the harmony. In choral music without instrumental accompaniment, the bass is supplied by adult male bass singers. In an orchestra, the basslines are played by the double bass and cellos, bassoon or contrabassoon, low brass such as the tuba and bass trombone, and the timpani (kettledrums). In many styles of traditional music such as Bluegrass, folk, and in styles such as Rockabilly
Rockabilly
and Big Band
Big Band
and Bebop
Bebop
jazz, the bass role is filled by the upright bass. In most rock and pop bands and in jazz fusion groups, the bass role is filled by the electric bass
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Flamenco
Flamenco
Flamenco
(Spanish pronunciation: [flaˈmeŋko]), in its strictest sense, is a professionalized art-form based on the various folkloric music traditions of Southern Spain in the autonomous communities of Andalusia, Extremadura
Extremadura
and Murcia. In a wider sense, it refers to these musical traditions and more modern musical styles which have themselves been deeply influenced by and become blurred with the development of flamenco over the past two centuries. It includes cante (singing), toque (guitar playing), baile (dance), jaleo (vocalizations), palmas (handclapping) and pitos (finger snapping).[1] The oldest record of flamenco dates to 1774 in the book Las Cartas Marruecas by José Cadalso.[2] The genre originated in the music and dance styles of Andalusia
Andalusia
which is mostly related to the Middle-East[citation needed]
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Andrés Segovia
Andrés Segovia
Andrés Segovia
Torres, 1st Marquis of Salobreña (Spanish: [anˈdɾes seˈɣoβja ˈtores]) (21 February 1893 – 2 June 1987),[1] known as Andrés Segovia, was a virtuoso Spanish classical guitarist from Linares, Spain. Many professional classical guitarists today are students of Segovia, or students of his students.[2] Segovia's contribution to the modern-romantic repertoire not only included commissions but also his own transcriptions of classical or baroque works. He is remembered for his expressive performances: his wide palette of tone, and his distinctive musical personality, phrasing and style.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Technique 4 Repertoire4.1 Teaching 4.2 Legacy4.2.1 Namings5 Awards 6 Personal life 7 Students 8 See also 9 References 10 Bibliography 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Segovia was born in Linares, Jaén, Spain. He was sent at a very young age to live with his uncle Eduardo and aunt María
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Tremolo
In music, tremolo (Italian pronunciation: [ˈtrɛːmolo]), or tremolando ([tremoˈlando]), is a trembling effect. There are two types of tremolo. The first is a rapid reiteration:of a single note, particularly used on bowed string instruments, by rapidly moving the bow back and forth; plucked strings such as on a harp, where it is called bisbigliando (Italian pronunciation: [bizbiʎˈʎando]) or "whispering"; and tremolo picking, in which a single note is repeated extremely rapidly with a plectrum (or "pick") on traditionally plucked string instruments such as guitar, mandolin, etc. between two notes or chords in alternation, an imitation (not to be confused with a trill) of the preceding that is more common on keyboard instruments
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Timbre
In music, timbre (/ˈtæmbər/ TAM-bər, also known as tone color or tone quality from psychoacoustics) is the perceived sound quality of a musical note, sound or tone. Timbre
Timbre
distinguishes different types of sound production, such as choir voices and musical instruments, such as string instruments, wind instruments, and percussion instruments. It also enables listeners to distinguish different instruments in the same category (e.g. an oboe and a clarinet). The physical characteristics of sound that determine the perception of timbre include spectrum and envelope. Singers and instrumental musicians can change the timbre of the music they are singing/playing by using different singing or playing techniques
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John Williams (guitarist)
John Christopher Williams (born 24 April 1941) is an Australian virtuosic classical guitarist renowned for his ensemble playing as well as his interpretation and promotion of the modern classical guitar repertoire
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Accompaniment
Accompaniment
Accompaniment
is the musical parts which provide the rhythmic and/or harmonic support for the melody or main themes of a song or instrumental piece. There are many different styles and types of accompaniment in different genres and styles of music. In homophonic music, the main accompaniment approach used in popular music, a clear vocal melody is supported by subordinate chords. In popular music and traditional music, the accompaniment parts typically provide the "beat" for the music and outline the chord progression of the song or instrumental piece. The accompaniment for a vocal melody or instrumental solo can be played by a single musician playing an instrument such as piano, pipe organ, or guitar
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Classical Guitar Technique
In classical guitar, the right hand is developed in such a way that it can sustain two, three, and four voice harmonies while also paying special attention to tone production. The Fingers (i) index, (m) middle, and (a) ring are generally used to play the melody, while (p) thumb accompanies in the bass register adding harmony, and produces a comparable texture and effect to that of the piano
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Art Music
Art music
Art music
(also called Western classical music, cultivated music, serious music, canonic music,[1] or erudite music[citation needed]) is music that implies advanced structural and theoretical considerations[2] and a written musical tradition.[3] The terms "serious" or "cultivated" are frequently used in relation to music in order to present a contrast with ordinary, everyday music (i.e. popular and folk music, also called "vernacular music").[4] After the 20th century, art music was divided into "serious music" and "light music".[5]Contents1 Definition 2 Popular music 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDefinition[edit] "Art music" is mostly used to refer to music descending from the tradition of Western classical music
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Classical Period (music)
The dates of the Classical period in Western music are generally accepted as being between about the year 1730 and the year 1820. However, the term classical music is often used in a colloquial sense as a synonym for Western art music which describes a variety of Western musical styles from the Middle Ages to the present, and especially from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period in most of the 18th century to the early 19th century, though overlapping with the Baroque and Romantic periods.[1] The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. Classical music
Classical music
has a lighter, clearer texture than Baroque music and is less complex. It is mainly homophonic, using a clear melody line over a subordinate chordal accompaniment,[2] but counterpoint was by no means forgotten, especially later in the period
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