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Fingerstyle
FINGERSTYLE GUITAR is the technique of playing the guitar by plucking the strings directly with the fingertips, fingernails, or picks attached to fingers, as opposed to flatpicking (plucking individual notes with a single plectrum , commonly called a "pick"). The term "fingerstyle" is something of a misnomer, since it is present in several different genres and styles of music—but mostly, because it involves a completely different technique, not just a "style" of playing, especially for the guitarist's picking/plucking hand. The term is often used synonymously with FINGERPICKING, although fingerpicking can also refer to a specific tradition of folk , blues and country guitar playing in the US. See below
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Romantic Music
ROMANTIC MUSIC is a period of Western classical music that began in the late 18th or early 19th century. It is related to Romanticism
Romanticism
, the European artistic and literary movement that arose in the second half of the 18th century, and Romantic music
Romantic music
in particular dominated the Romantic movement in Germany. The title character from a 19th-century performance of Wagner 's opera Siegfried In the Romantic period, music became more expressive and emotional, expanding to encompass literary, artistic, and philosophical themes. Famous early Romantic composers include Beethoven (whose works span both this period and the preceding Classical period) , Schubert , Schumann , Chopin , Mendelssohn , Bellini , and Berlioz . The late 19th century saw a dramatic expansion in the size of the orchestra and in the dynamic range and diversity of instruments used in this ensemble
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Double Stop
In music, a DOUBLE STOP refers to the technique of playing two notes simultaneously on a bowed stringed instrument such as a violin , a viola, a cello , or a double bass . In performing a double stop, two separate strings are bowed or plucked simultaneously. Although the term itself suggests these strings are to be fingered (stopped), in practice one or both strings may be open. A TRIPLE STOP is the same technique applied to three strings; a QUADRUPLE STOP applies to four strings. Double, triple, and quadruple stopping are collectively known as MULTIPLE STOPPING. Eine kleine Nachtmusik – 1. Allegro Performed by the Advent Chamber Orchestra. Notice the triple stop in the Violins at the first chord. ------------------------- Problems playing this file? See media help .Early extensive examples of the double-stop and string chords appear in Carlo Farina 's Capriccio Stravagante from 1627, and in certain of the sonatas of Biagio Marini 's op
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Polyphonically
In music , POLYPHONY is one type of musical texture , where a texture is, generally speaking, the way that melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic aspects of a musical composition are combined to shape the overall sound and quality of the work. In particular, POLYPHONY consists of two or more simultaneous lines of independent melody, as opposed to a musical texture with just one voice, monophony , or a texture with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords , which is called homophony . Within the context of the Western musical tradition, the term polyphony is usually used to refer to music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance . Baroque forms such as fugue , which might be called polyphonic, are usually described instead as contrapuntal . Also, as opposed to the species terminology of counterpoint, polyphony was generally either "pitch-against-pitch" / "point-against-point" or "sustained-pitch" in one part with melismas of varying lengths in another
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Polyphonic
In music , POLYPHONY is one type of musical texture , where a texture is, generally speaking, the way that melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic aspects of a musical composition are combined to shape the overall sound and quality of the work. In particular, POLYPHONY consists of two or more simultaneous lines of independent melody, as opposed to a musical texture with just one voice, monophony , or a texture with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords , which is called homophony . Within the context of the Western musical tradition, the term polyphony is usually used to refer to music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance . Baroque forms such as fugue , which might be called polyphonic, are usually described instead as contrapuntal . Also, as opposed to the species terminology of counterpoint, polyphony was generally either "pitch-against-pitch" / "point-against-point" or "sustained-pitch" in one part with melismas of varying lengths in another
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Chord Progression
A CHORD PROGRESSION or HARMONIC PROGRESSION is a succession of musical chords , which are three or more notes, typically sounded simultaneously. Chord progressions are the foundation of harmony in Western musical tradition from the common practice era of Classical music to the 21st century. Chord progressions are the foundation of Western popular music styles (e.g., pop music , rock music ) and traditional music (e.g., blues and jazz ). In tonal music, chord progressions have the function of establishing or contradicting a tonality , the technical name for what is commonly understood as the "key" of a song or piece. Chord progressions are usually expressed by Roman numerals in Classical music music theory; for example, the common chord progression I vi/ii V7. In many styles of popular and traditional music, chord progressions are expressed using the name and "quality" of the chords
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Finger
A FINGER is a limb of the human body and a type of digit , an organ of manipulation and sensation found in the hands of humans and other primates . Normally humans have five digits, the bones of which are termed phalanges, on each hand, although some people have more or fewer than five due to congenital disorders such as polydactyly or oligodactyly , or accidental or medical amputations . The first digit is the thumb , followed by index finger , middle finger , ring finger , and little finger or pinky. According to different definitions, the thumb can be called a finger, or not
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Arrangement
In music , an ARRANGEMENT is a musical reconceptualization of a previously composed work. It may differ from the original work by means of reharmonization, melodic paraphrasing, orchestration, or development of the formal structure. Arranging differs from orchestration in that the latter process is limited to the assignment of notes to instruments for performance by an orchestra , concert band , or other musical ensemble . Arranging "involves adding compositional techniques, such as new thematic material for introductions, transitions, or modulations , and endings.... Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety"
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Accompaniment
ACCOMPANIMENT is the musical parts which provide the rhythmic and/or harmonic support for the melody or main themes of a song or instrumental piece. There are many different styles and types of accompaniment in different genres and styles of music. In homophonic music , the main accompaniment approach used in popular music , a clear vocal melody is supported by subordinate chords . In popular music and traditional music , the accompaniment parts typically provide the "beat" for the music and outline the chord progression of the song or instrumental piece. The accompaniment for a vocal melody or instrumental solo can be played by a single musician playing an instrument such as piano , pipe organ , or guitar
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Harmony
In music , HARMONY considers the process by which the composition of individual sounds, or superpositions of sounds, is analysed by hearing. Usually, this means simultaneously occurring frequencies , pitches (tones , notes ), or chords . The study of harmony involves chords and their construction and chord progressions and the principles of connection that govern them. Harmony
Harmony
is often said to refer to the "vertical" aspect of music, as distinguished from melodic line , or the "horizontal" aspect. Counterpoint
Counterpoint
, which refers to the relationship between melodic lines, and polyphony , which refers to the simultaneous sounding of separate independent voices, are thus sometimes distinguished from harmony. In popular and jazz harmony , chords are named by their root plus various terms and characters indicating their qualities
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Bass (sound)
BASS describes tones of low (also called "deep") frequency , pitch and range from 16-256 Hz (C0 to middle C 4). In musical compositions, such as songs and pieces, these are the lowest parts of the harmony . In choral music without instrumental accompaniment, the bass is supplied by adult male bass singers. In an orchestra , the basslines are played by the double bass and cellos , bassoon or contrabassoon , low brass such as the tuba and bass trombone , and the timpani (kettledrums). In many styles of traditional music such as Bluegrass , folk , and in styles such as Rockabilly
Rockabilly
and Big Band
Big Band
and Bebop
Bebop
jazz , the bass role is filled by the upright bass . In most rock and pop bands and in jazz fusion groups, the bass role is filled by the electric bass
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Lute
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(early lutes) Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(modern lutes) RELATED INSTRUMENTS List * * Angélique *
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John Williams (guitarist)
JOHN CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS (born 24 April 1941) is an Australian virtuosic classical guitarist renowned for his ensemble playing as well as his interpretation and promotion of the modern classical guitar repertoire. In 1973, he shared a Grammy Award in the Best Chamber Music Performance category with fellow guitarist Julian Bream for Julian and John (Works by Lawes, Carulli, Albéniz, Granados)
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Classical Guitar Technique
In classical guitar, the right hand is developed in such a way that it can sustain two, three, and four voice harmonies while also paying special attention to tone production. The Fingers (i) index, (m) middle, and (a) ring are generally used to play the melody, while (p) thumb accompanies in the bass register adding harmony, and produces a comparable texture and effect to that of the piano. The classical guitar is one of the very few solo polyphonic instruments, and is notoriously very difficult to master
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Timbre
In music , TIMBRE (/ˈtæmbər/ TAM-bər , also known as TONE COLOR or TONE QUALITY from psychoacoustics ), is the perceived sound quality of a musical note , sound, or tone. Timbre
Timbre
distinguishes different types of sound production, such as choir voices and musical instruments , such as string instruments , wind instruments , and percussion instruments. It also enables listeners to distinguish different instruments in the same category (e.g. an oboe and a clarinet ). The physical characteristics of sound that determine the perception of timbre include spectrum and envelope . Singers and instrumental musicians can change the timbre of the music they are singing/playing by using different singing or playing techniques
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Classical Period (music)
The dates of the CLASSICAL PERIOD in Western music are generally accepted as being between about the year 1730 and the year 1820. However, the term classical music is often used in a colloquial sense as a synonym for Western art music which describes a variety of Western musical styles from the Middle Ages to the present, and especially from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period in most of the 18th century to the early 19th century, though overlapping with the Baroque and Romantic periods. The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. Classical music
Classical music
has a lighter, clearer texture than Baroque music and is less complex. It is mainly homophonic , using a clear melody line over a subordinate chordal accompaniment , but counterpoint was by no means forgotten, especially later in the period
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