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Fingerstyle
FINGERSTYLE GUITAR is the technique of playing the guitar by plucking the strings directly with the fingertips, fingernails, or picks attached to fingers, as opposed to flatpicking (plucking individual notes with a single plectrum , commonly called a "pick"). The term "fingerstyle" is something of a misnomer, since it is present in several different genres and styles of music—but mostly, because it involves a completely different technique, not just a "style" of playing, especially for the guitarist's picking/plucking hand. The term is often used synonymously with FINGERPICKING, although fingerpicking can also refer to a specific tradition of folk , blues and country guitar playing in the US. See below
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Finger Style Guitar
FINGER-STYLE GUITAR is an album by American guitarist Chet Atkins
Chet Atkins
, released in 1956. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Reception * 3 Reissues * 4 Track listing * 4.1 Side one * 4.2 Side two * 5 Personnel * 6 References HISTORYThe original LP consisted of a light rhythm section on the first side and Chet solo on side two. The four Frank Loesser tunes on the re-release are from the 1956 musical The Most Happy Fella with vocals by Eddy Arnold , all released on an RCA Victor EP . Also included are two duets with Hank Snow and a single released by The Rhythm Rockers. "Blue Echo" was co-written with Boudleaux Bryant , who also co-wrote "How's the World Treating You" and others with Chet. "Blue Echo" was later covered by Lenny Breau
Lenny Breau
on his album Boy Wonder. Finger-Style Guitar
Guitar
was recorded in one day
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Guitar Picking
GUITAR PICKING is a group of hand and finger techniques a guitarist uses to set guitar strings in motion to produce audible notes. These techniques involve plucking, strumming , brushing, etc. Picking can be done with: * A (pick (plectrum) ) held in the hand * Natural or artificial fingernails , fingertips or finger-mounted plectrums known as fingerpicks (for techniques collectively known as fingerstyle ) * A plectrum held between thumb and one finger, supplemented by the free fingers—called hybrid picking .Using a single thumb pick with the bare fingers is similar to hybrid picking. Another mixed technique is to play different passages with a plectrum or fingerstyle, "palming " the plectrum when not in use
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Flatpicking
FLATPICKING (or simply PICKING) is the technique of striking the strings with a pick (also called a plectrum ) held between the thumb and one or two fingers. It can be contrasted to fingerstyle guitar , which is playing with individual fingers, with or without wearing fingerpicks . While the use of a plectrum is common in many musical traditions, the exact term "flatpicking" is most commonly associated with Appalachian music of the American southeastern highlands, especially bluegrass music , where string bands often feature musicians playing a variety of styles, both fingerpicking and flatpicking. Musicians who use a flat pick in other genres such as rock and jazz are not commonly described as flatpickers or even plectrum guitarists. As the use of a pick in those traditions is commonplace, generally only guitarists who play without a pick are noted by the term "fingerpicking" or "fingerstyle"
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Plectrum
A PLECTRUM is a small flat tool used to pluck or strum a stringed instrument . For hand-held instruments such as guitars and mandolins , the plectrum is often called a PICK, and is a separate tool held in the player's hand. In harpsichords , the plectra are attached to the jack mechanism. CONTENTS* 1 Plectra wielded by hand * 1.1 Guitars and similar instruments * 1.2 Non-Western instruments * 1.3 Gallery: plectra from around the world * 2 Plectra in harpsichords * 2.1 Voicing harpsichord plectra * 3 Etymology and usage * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 External links * 7 References PLECTRA WIELDED BY HANDGUITARS AND SIMILAR INSTRUMENTS Main article: Guitar pick A plectrum (pick) for electric guitars , acoustic guitars , bass guitars and mandolins is typically a thin piece of plastic or other material shaped like a pointed teardrop or triangle. The size, shape and width may vary considerably
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Folk Music
FOLK MUSIC includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival . The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music . TRADITIONAL FOLK MUSIC has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally , music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles . Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s. This form of music is sometimes called contemporary folk music or folk revival music to distinguish it from earlier folk forms
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Blues
BLUES is a genre and musical form originated by African Americans in the Deep South of the United States around the end of the 19th century. The genre developed from roots in African musical traditions , African-American work songs , spirituals , and folk music . Blues incorporated spirituals , work songs , field hollers , shouts , chants , and rhymed simple narrative ballads . The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz , rhythm and blues and rock and roll , is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions , of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common. Blue notes (or "worried notes"), usually thirds or fifths flattened in pitch , are also an essential part of the sound. Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove . Blues as a genre is also characterized by its lyrics, bass lines, and instrumentation
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Country Music
COUNTRY MUSIC (frequently referred to as just COUNTRY) is a musical genre that originated in the Southern United States
Southern United States
in the 1920s. It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music ) and blues . Country music
Country music
often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos , electric and acoustic guitars , steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros ), and fiddles as well as harmonicas . Blues
Blues
modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history . According to Lindsey Starnes, the term _country music_ gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term _hillbilly music_; it came to encompass Western music , which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century
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Chord (music)
A CHORD, in music , is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of two or more (usually three or more) notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously . (For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords, or sequences of chord tones , may also be considered as chords.) Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern West African and Oceanic music, Western classical music, and Western popular music ; yet, they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world. In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and Intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note. Other chords with more than three notes include added tone chords , extended chords and tone clusters , which are used in contemporary classical music , jazz and other genres
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Arpeggios
A "BROKEN CHORD" is a chord broken into a sequence of notes. A broken chord may repeat some of the notes from the chord and span one or more octaves. An ARPEGGIO (Italian: ) is a type of "broken chord" where the notes that compose a chord are played or sung in a rising or descending order. An arpeggio may also span more than one octave . The word "arpeggio" comes from the Italian word "arpeggiare", which means "to play on a harp ". Even though the notes of an arpeggio are not played or sung all together at the same time, listeners hear the sequence of notes as forming a chord. When an arpeggio also contains passing tones that are not part of the chord, different music theorists may analyze the same musical excerpt differently. Arpeggios enable composers writing for monophonic instruments that play one note at a time (e.g., flute , saxophone , trumpet ), to voice chords and chord progressions in musical pieces
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Artificial Harmonic
To produce an ARTIFICIAL HARMONIC, a stringed instrument player holds down a note on the neck with one finger of the non-dominant hand (thereby shortening the vibrational length of the string) and uses another finger to lightly touch a point on the string that is an integer divisor of its vibrational length, and plucks or bows the side of the string that is closer to the bridge. This technique is used to produce harmonic tones that are otherwise inaccessible on the instrument. To guitar players, one variety of this technique is known as a pinch harmonic . This technique, like natural harmonics , works by canceling out the fundamental tone and one or more partial tones by deadening their modes of vibration. See node . DETAILED EXPLANATIONOVERTONES Playing a NATURAL harmonic on a string. Table of harmonics of a stringed instrument with colored dots indicating which positions can be lightly fingered to generate just intervals up to the 7th harmonic
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Hammer-on
A HAMMER-ON is a playing technique performed on a stringed instrument (especially on a fretted string instrument, such as a guitar ) by sharply bringing a fretting-hand finger down on the fingerboard behind a fret , causing a note to sound. This technique is the opposite of the pull-off . Passages in which a large proportion of the notes are performed as hammer-ons and pull-offs instead of being plucked or picked in the usual fashion are known in classical guitar terminology as legato phrases . The sound is smoother and more connected than in a normally picked phrase, due to the absence of the necessity to synchronize the plucking of one hand with the fingering on the fingerboard with the other hand; however, the resulting sounds are not as brightly audible, precisely due to the absence of the plucking of the string, the vibration of the string from an earlier plucking dying off
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Pull-off
A PULL-OFF is a stringed instrument plucking technique performed by "pulling" the finger off a string off the fingerboard of either a fretted or unfretted instrument. CONTENTS* 1 Performance and effect * 1.1 Acoustic versus electric instruments * 1.2 Left-hand pizzicato * 2 Invention of the term * 3 Sources PERFORMANCE AND EFFECTA pull-off is performed on a string which is already vibrating; when the fretting finger is pulled off (exposing the string either as open or as stopped by another fretting finger lower on the same string) the note playing on the string changes to the new, longer vibrating length of the string. Pull-offs are performed on both fretted instruments (e.g., electric guitar ) and unfretted instruments (e.g., violin ). They are used to sound grace notes with the transition from one note to the other sounding gentler and less percussive because the string is not picked or bowed again to produce the sound of the second note
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Melody
A MELODY ("singing, chanting"), also TUNE, VOICE, or LINE, is a linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm , while more figuratively, the term can include successions of other musical elements such as tonal color . It may be considered the foreground to the background accompaniment . A line or part need not be a foreground melody. Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases or motifs , and are usually repeated throughout a composition in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjunct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence , and shape. The true goal of music—its proper enterprise—is melody
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Bassline
A BASSLINE (also known as a BASS LINE or BASS PART) is the term used in many styles of popular music , such as jazz , blues , funk , dub and electronic , or traditional music , for the low-pitched instrumental part or line played by a rhythm section instrument such as the electric bass , double bass , cello , tuba or keyboard (piano , Hammond organ , electric organ, or synthesizer). It is also used sometimes in classical music. In unaccompanied solo performance, basslines may simply be played in the lower register of any instrument such as guitar or piano while melody and/or further accompaniment is provided in the middle or upper register. In solo music for piano and pipe organ, these instruments have an excellent lower register that can be used to play a deep bassline. On organs, the bass line is typically played using the pedal keyboard and massive 16' and 32' bass pipes
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Classical Guitar
The CLASSICAL GUITAR (also known as CONCERT GUITAR, CLASSICAL ACOUSTIC, NYLON-STRING GUITAR, or SPANISH GUITAR) is the member of the guitar family used in classical music . It is an acoustical wooden guitar with strings made of nylon, rather than the metal strings used in acoustic and electric guitars . The traditional classical guitar has twelve frets clear of the body and is held on the left leg, so that the hand that plucks or strums the strings does so near the back of the soundhole (this is called the classical position). The modern steel string guitar, on the other hand, usually has fourteen frets clear of the body (see Dreadnought ) and is commonly played off the hip
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