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Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo
is a 2003 American computer-animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios
Pixar Animation Studios
and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Written and directed by Andrew Stanton
Andrew Stanton
with co-direction by Lee Unkrich, the film stars the voices of Albert Brooks, Ellen DeGeneres, Alexander Gould, and Willem Dafoe. It tells the story of the overprotective ocellaris clownfish named Marlin who, along with a regal blue tang named Dory, searches for his abducted son Nemo all the way to Sydney Harbour. Along the way, Marlin learns to take risks and comes to terms with Nemo taking care of himself. Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo
was released on May 30, 2003; the film won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, and was nominated in three more categories, including Best Original Screenplay
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Starfish
† Calliasterellidae † Trichasteropsida[2] Starfish
Starfish
or sea stars are star-shaped echinoderms belonging to the class Asteroidea. Common usage frequently finds these names being also applied to ophiuroids, which are correctly referred to as brittle stars or "basket stars". About 1,500 species of starfish occur on the seabed in all the world's oceans, from the tropics to frigid polar waters. They are found from the intertidal zone down to abyssal depths, 6,000 m (20,000 ft) below the surface. Starfish
Starfish
are marine invertebrates. They typically have a central disc and five arms, though some species have a larger number of arms. The aboral or upper surface may be smooth, granular or spiny, and is covered with overlapping plates
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Anglerfish
Anglerfish
Anglerfish
are fish of the teleost order Lophiiformes /ˌlɒfiːəˈfɔːrmiːz/.[1] They are bony fish named for their characteristic mode of predation, in which a fleshy growth from the fish's head (the esca or illicium) acts as a lure. Some anglerfish are also notable for extreme sexual dimorphism and sexual symbiosis of the small male with the much larger female, seen in the suborder Ceratioidei. In these species, males may be several orders of magnitude smaller than females.[2] Anglerfish
Anglerfish
occur worldwide. Some are pelagic (dwelling away from the sea floor), while others are benthic (dwelling close to the sea floor); some live in the deep sea (e.g., Ceratiidae), while others on the continental shelf (e.g., the frogfishes Antennariidae
Antennariidae
and the monkfish/goosefish Lophiidae)
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3D Film
A three-dimensional stereoscopic film (also known as three-dimensional film, 3D film
3D film
or S3D film)[1] is a motion picture that enhances the illusion of depth perception, hence adding a third dimension. The most common approach to the production of 3D films is derived from stereoscopic photography. In this approach, a regular motion picture camera system is used to record the images as seen from two perspectives (or computer-generated imagery generates the two perspectives in post-production), and special projection hardware and/or eyewear are used to limit the visibility of each image to the viewer's left or right eye only
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American Film Institute
The American Film Institute
American Film Institute
(AFI) is an American film
American film
organization that educates filmmakers and honors the heritage of the motion picture arts in the United States. AFI is supported by private funding and public membership.Contents1 Leadership 2 History 3 List of programs in brief 4 AFI Conservatory4.1 Notable alumni5 AFI programs5.1 AFI Catalog of Feature Films 5.2 AFI Life Achievement Award 5.3 AFI Awards 5.4 AFI Maya Deren Award 5.5 AFI 100 Years... series 5.6 AFI film festivals5.6.1 AFI Fest 5.6.2 AFI Docs5.7 AFI Silver
AFI Silver
Theatre and Cultural Center 5.8 The AFI Directing Workshop for Women6 AFI Directors Series 7 In popular culture 8 2017 Sexual harassment allegations 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeadership[edit] The institute is composed of leaders from the film, entertainment, business and academic communities
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Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
is the world's largest coral reef system[1][2] composed of over 2,900 individual reefs[3] and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres (1,400 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi).[4][5] The reef is located in the Coral
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Fish Eggs
Roe
Roe
(/roʊ/) or hard roe is the fully ripe internal egg masses in the ovaries, or the released external egg masses of fish and certain marine animals, such as shrimp, scallop and sea urchins. As a seafood, roe is used both as a cooked ingredient in many dishes and as a raw ingredient
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Barracuda
The barracuda is a ray-finned fish known for its large size, fearsome appearance and ferocious behaviour
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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Sydney Harbour
Port Jackson, consisting of the waters of Sydney
Sydney
Harbour, Middle Harbour, North Harbour and the Lane Cove and Parramatta
Parramatta
Rivers, is the ria or natural harbour of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The harbour is an inlet of the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
(part of the South Pacific Ocean). It is the location of the Sydney
Sydney
Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge. The location of the first European settlement and colony on the Australian mainland
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Silver Moony
Monodactylus
Monodactylus
argentus is a species of fish in the family Monodactylidae, the moonyfishes. Its common names include silver moonyfish, or silver moony,[1] butter bream, and diamondfish.[2] It is native to the western Pacific and Indian Oceans, including the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and associated estuaries, such as the Mekong Delta.[1] This species reaches a maximum length of about 27 centimeters
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Blue Whale
The blue whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whales (Mysticeti).[3] At up to 29.9 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and with a maximum recorded weight of 173 tonnes (190 short tons)[4] and probably reaching over 181 tonnes (200 short tons), it is the largest animal known to have ever existed.[5][6] Long and slender, the blue whale's body can be various shades of bluish-grey dorsally and somewhat lighter underneath.[7] There are at least three distinct subspecies: B. m. musculus of the North Atlantic and North Pacific, B. m. intermedia of the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
and B. m. brevicauda (also known as the pygmy blue whale) found in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean. B. m. indica, found in the Indian Ocean, may be another subspecies
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Blowhole (anatomy)
In cetology, a blowhole is the hole at the top of a cetacean's head through which the animal breathes air. It is homologous with the nostril of other mammals, and evolved via gradual movement of the nostrils to the top of the head.[1] As whales reach the water surface to breathe, they will forcefully expel air through the blowhole. The exhalation is released into the comparably lower-pressure, colder atmosphere, and any water vapor condenses. This spray, known as the blow, is often visible from far away as a white splash, which can also be caused by water resting on top of the blowhole. Air sacs just below the blowhole allow whales to produce sounds for communication and (for those species capable of it) echolocation. These air sacs are filled with air, which is then released again to produce sound in a similar fashion to releasing air from a balloon. When whales dive under water their nasal plug covers the nasal passage to the blowhole
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Gull
11, see textFlying subadult silver gulls at Kiama beach, Sydney during Christmas 2013Gulls or seagulls are seabirds of the family Laridae
Laridae
in the suborder Lari. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae) and only distantly related to auks, skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until the 21st century, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now considered polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera.[1] An older name for gulls is mews, cognate with German Möwe, Danish måge, Dutch meeuw, and French mouette; this term can still be found in certain regional dialects.[2][3][4] Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls; stout, longish bills; and webbed feet
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Grouper
Groupers are fish of any of a number of genera in the subfamily Epinephelinae of the family Serranidae, in the order Perciformes. Not all serranids are called groupers; the family also includes the sea basses. The common name grouper is usually given to fish in one of two large genera: Epinephelus
Epinephelus
and Mycteroperca. In addition, the species classified in the small genera Anyperidon, Cromileptes, Dermatolepis, Gracila, Saloptia, and Triso are also called groupers. Fish
Fish
in the genus Plectropomus
Plectropomus
are referred to as coralgroupers. These genera are all classified in the subfamily Epiphelinae. However, some of the hamlets (genus Alphestes), the hinds (genus Cephalopholis), the lyretails (genus Variola) and some other small genera (Gonioplectrus, Niphon, Paranthias) are also in this subfamily, and occasional species in other serranid genera have common names involving the word "grouper"
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