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Financial Statement
[1][clarification needed] Historical financial statements Financial statements
Financial statements
(or financial reports) are formal records of the financial activities and position of a business, person, or other entity. Relevant financial information is presented in a structured manner and in a form which is easy to understand. They typically include four basic financial statements accompanied by a management discussion and analysis:[2]A balance sheet or statement of financial position, reports on a company's assets, liabilities, and owners equity at a given point in time. An income statement—or profit and loss report (P&L report), or statement of comprehensive income, or statement of revenue & expense—reports on a company's income, expenses, and profits over a stated period of time. A profit and loss statement provides information on the operation of the enterprise
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Double-entry Bookkeeping System
Double-entry bookkeeping, in accounting, is a system of bookkeeping so named because every entry to an account requires a corresponding and opposite entry to a different account. The double entry has two equal and corresponding sides known as debit and credit. The left-hand side is debit and right-hand side is credit. For instance, recording a sale of $100 might require two entries: a debit of $100 to an account named "Cash" and a credit of $100 to an account named "Revenue."[further explanation needed] The accounting equation, Assets = Equity + Liabilities displaystyle text Assets = text Equity + text Liabilities , is an error detection tool; if at any point the sum of debits for all accounts does not equal the corresponding sum of credits for all accounts, an error has occurred
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Accounting Standards
Financial statements prepared and presented by a company typically follow an external standard that specifically guides their preparation. These standards vary across the globe and are typically overseen by some combination of the private accounting profession in that specific nation and the various government regulators. Variations across countries may be considerable making cross country evaluation of financial data challenging. Publicly traded companies typically are subject to the most rigorous standards. Small and midsize businesses often follow more simplified standards, plus any specific disclosures required by their specific lenders and shareholders. Some firms operate on the cash method of accounting which can often be simple and straight forward. Larger firms most often operate on an accrual basis
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Cost Of Goods Sold
Cost of goods sold
Cost of goods sold
(COGS) refers to the carrying value of goods sold during a particular period. Costs are associated with particular goods using one of the several formulas, including specific identification, first-in first-out (FIFO), or average cost. Costs include all costs of purchase, costs of conversion and other costs that are incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. Costs of goods made by the businesses include material, labor, and allocated overhead
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Amortization
Amortization (or amortisation; see spelling differences) is paying off an amount owed over time by making planned, incremental payments of principal and interest. To amortize a loan means "to kill it off".[1] In accounting, amortization refers to charging or writing off an intangible asset's cost as an operational expense over its estimated useful life to reduce a company's taxable income.[2][1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Applications of amortization 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] The word comes from Middle English amortisen to kill, alienate in mortmain, from Anglo-French amorteser, alteration of amortir, from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
admortire "to kill", from Latin
Latin
ad- and mort-, "death". Applications of amortization[edit]When used in the context of a home purchase, amortization is the process by which loan principal decreases over the life of a loan, typically an amortizing loan
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: equity = assets value − liabilities displaystyle text equity = text assets value - text liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to a corporation's share capital (capital stock in American English)
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Expense
In common usage, an expense or expenditure is an outflow of money to another person or group to pay for an item or service, or for a category of costs. For a tenant, rent is an expense. For students or parents, tuition is an expense. Buying food, clothing, furniture or an automobile is often referred to as an expense. An expense is a cost that is "paid" or "remitted", usually in exchange for something of value. Something that seems to cost a great deal is "expensive". Something that seems to cost little is "inexpensive". " Expenses
Expenses
of the table" are expenses of dining, refreshments, a feast, etc. In accounting, expense has a very specific meaning. It is an outflow of cash or other valuable assets from a person or company to another person or company. This outflow of cash is generally one side of a trade for products or services that have equal or better current or future value to the buyer than to the seller
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Goodwill (accounting)
Goodwill in accounting is an intangible asset that arises when a buyer acquires an existing business. Goodwill represents assets that are not separately identifiable. Goodwill does not include identifiable assets that are capable of being separated or divided from the entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented, or exchanged, either individually or together with a related contract, identifiable asset, or liability regardless of whether the entity intends to do so. Goodwill also does not include contractual or other legal rights regardless of whether those are transferable or separable from the entity or other rights and obligations. Examples of identifiable assets that are not goodwill include a company’s brand name, customer relationships, artistic intangible assets, and any patents or proprietary technology. The goodwill amounts to the excess of the "purchase consideration" (the money paid to purchase the asset or business) over the total value of the assets and liabilities
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Profit (accounting)
Profit, in accounting, is an income distributed to the owner in a profitable market production process (business). Profit is a measure of profitability which is the owner’s major interest in income formation process of market production. There are several profit measures in common use. Income
Income
formation in market production is always a balance between income generation and income distribution. The income generated is always distributed to the stakeholders of production as economic value within the review period. The profit is the share of income formation the owner is able to keep to himself/herself in the income distribution process. Profit is one of the major sources of economic well-being because it means incomes and opportunities to develop production
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Revenue
In accounting, revenue is the income that a business has from its normal business activities, usually from the sale of goods and services to customers. Revenue
Revenue
is also referred to as sales or turnover. Some companies receive revenue from interest, royalties, or other fees.[1] Revenue
Revenue
may refer to business income in general, or it may refer to the amount, in a monetary unit, earned during a period of time, as in "Last year, Company X had revenue of $42 million". Profits or net income generally imply total revenue minus total expenses in a given period. In accounting, in the balance statement it is a subsection of the Equity section and revenue increases equity, it is often referred to as the "top line" due to its position on the income statement at the very top
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Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
Financial statements prepared and presented by a company typically follow an external standard that specifically guides their preparation. These standards vary across the globe and are typically overseen by some combination of the private accounting profession in that specific nation and the various government regulators. Variations across countries may be considerable making cross country evaluation of financial data challenging. Publicly traded companies typically are subject to the most rigorous standards. Small and midsize businesses often follow more simplified standards, plus any specific disclosures required by their specific lenders and shareholders. Some firms operate on the cash method of accounting which can often be simple and straight forward. Larger firms most often operate on an accrual basis
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is any resource owned by the business. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets
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Generally Accepted Auditing Standards
Generally Accepted Auditing
Auditing
Standards, or GAAS are sets of standards against which the quality of audits are performed and may be judged. Several organizations have developed such sets of principles, which vary by territory. In the United States, the standards are promulgated by the Auditing
Auditing
Standards Board, a division of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). AU[1] Section 150 states that there are ten standards:[2] three general standards, three fieldwork standards, and four reporting standards. These standards are issued and clarified Statements of Accounting
Accounting
Standards, with the first issued in 1972 to replace previous guidance. Typically, the first number of the AU section refers to which standard applies
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Convergence Of Accounting Standards
The convergence of accounting standards refers to the goal of establishing a single set of accounting standards that will be used internationally.[1] Convergence in some form has been taking place for several decades,[2] and efforts today include projects that aim to reduce the differences between accounting standards.[3] Convergence is driven by several factors, including the belief that having a single set of accounting requirements would increase the comparability of different entities' accounting numbers, which will contribute to the flow of international investment and benefit a variety of stakeholders.[1][4] Criticisms of convergence include its cost and pace,[5] and the idea that the link between convergence and comparability may not be strong.[6]Contents1 Overview1.1 European Union 1.2 United Kingdom 1.3 United States2 Motivation 3 Criticisms3.1 Nature of standards4 History4.1 1950s and 1960s 4.2 1970s and 1990s 4.3 2000s 4.4 201
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Management Accounting Principles
Management accounting
Management accounting
principles (MAP) were developed to serve the core needs of internal management to improve decision support objectives, internal business processes, resource application, customer value, and capacity utilization needed to achieve corporate goals in an optimal manner. Another term often used for management accounting principles for these purposes is managerial costing principles. The two management accounting principles are:Principle of Causality (i.e., the need for cause and effect insights) and, Principle of Analogy (i.e., the application of causal insights by management in their activities).These two principles serve the management accounting community and its customers – the management of businesses. The above principles are incorporated into the Managerial Costing Conceptual Framework (MCCF) along with concepts and constraints to help govern the management accounting practice
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Annual Report
An annual report is a comprehensive report on a company's activities throughout the preceding year. Annual reports are intended to give shareholders and other interested people information about the company's activities and financial performance. They may be considered as grey literature. Most jurisdictions require companies to prepare and disclose annual reports, and many require the annual report to be filed at the company's registry
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