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Financial Conduct Authority
The Financial Conduct Authority
Financial Conduct Authority
(FCA) is a financial regulatory body in the United Kingdom, but operates independently of the UK Government, and is financed by charging fees to members of the financial services industry.[3] The FCA regulates financial firms providing services to consumers and maintains the integrity of the financial markets in the United Kingdom.[4] It focuses on the regulation of conduct by both retail and wholesale financial services firms.[5] Like its predecessor the FSA, the FCA is structured as a company limited by guarantee.Contents
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Mutual Society
A mutual, mutual organization, or mutual society is an organization (which is often, but not always, a company or business) based on the principle of mutuality. Unlike a true cooperative, members usually do not contribute to the capital of the company by direct investment, but derive their right to profits and votes through their customer relationship. A mutual organization or society is often simply referred to as a mutual. A mutual exists with the purpose of raising funds from its membership or customers (collectively called its members), which can then be used to provide common services to all members of the organization or society. A mutual is therefore owned by, and run for the benefit of, its members - it has no external shareholders to pay in the form of dividends, and as such does not usually seek to maximize and make large profits or capital gains
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BACS
Bacs Payment Schemes Limited (Bacs), formerly known as Bankers' Automated Clearing Services, is the organisation with responsibility for the schemes behind the clearing and settlement of UK automated payment methods Direct Debit and Bacs Direct Credit, as well as the provision of managed services for third parties.[1] These include the Cash ISA Transfer Service,[2] Biller Update Service[3] and the development, management and subsequent ownership of the Current Account Switch Service.[4] More than 125 billion transactions have been debited or credited to British bank accounts via Bacs since its inception; in 2017, more than 6.34 billion UK payments were made this way, while a new record was also set in June 2017 with the number of transactions processed by Bacs in a single day reaching 111.7 milli
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Conservative Party (United Kingdom)
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party,[11] is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed. In 2015, the Conservatives led by David Cameron won a surprise majority and formed the first Conservative majority government since 1992.[12] However, the 2017 snap election on Thursday 8 June resulted in a hung parliament, and the party lost its parliamentary majority.[13] It is reliant on the support of a Northern Irish political party, the Democratic Unionist Party
Democratic Unionist Party
(DUP), in order to command a majority in the House of Commons through a confidence-and-supply deal. The party leader, Theresa May,[14] has served as both Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister since 13 July 2016
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Financial Crisis Of 2007–08
The financial crisis of 2007–2008, also known as the global financial crisis and the 2008 financial crisis, is considered by many economists to have been the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s.[1][2][3][4] It began in 2007 with a crisis in the subprime mortgage market in the United States, and developed into a full-blown international banking crisis with the collapse of the investment bank Lehman Brothers
Lehman Brothers
on September 15, 2008.[5] Excessive risk-taking by banks such as Lehman Brothers helped to magnify the financial impact globally.[6] Massive bail-outs of financial institutions and other palliative monetary and fiscal policies were employed to prevent a possible collapse of the world financial system. The crisis was nonetheless followed by a global economic downturn, the Great Recession
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Bank Of Ireland
The Bank of Ireland
Bank of Ireland
(Irish: Banc na hÉireann) is a commercial bank operation in Ireland and one of the traditional 'Big Four' Irish banks. Historically the premier banking organisation in Ireland, the Bank occupies a unique position in Irish banking history
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KPMG
KPMG
KPMG
is a professional service company and one of the Big Four auditors, along with Deloitte, Ernst & Young (EY), and PricewaterhouseCoopers
PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC). Seated in Amstelveen,
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Securities And Futures Commission
The Securities
Securities
and Futures Commission (SFC) of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
is the independent statutory body charged with regulating the securities and futures markets in Hong Kong. The SFC is responsible for fostering an orderly securities and futures markets, to protect investors and to help promote Hong Kong
Hong Kong
as an international financial centre and a key financial market in China
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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LINK (UK)
LINK is a shared interbank network of automated teller machines (ATMs) operating in the United Kingdom.Contents1 Network 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksNetwork[edit] The network counts 38 member institutions, of which many are various banks and building societies issuing LINK ATM cards, and the remainder are independent ATM operators who do not issue cards.[1] The network connects over 70,000 ATMs – virtually every ATM in the United Kingdom.[2] The number of LINK free-to-use ATMs has continued to grow and overall ATM numbers are at an all-time high.[3] The LINK scheme is administered by LINK Scheme Ltd., based in Leeds, Yorkshire. The LINK network infrastructure is operated by VocaLink, a company formed in 2007 by the merger of LINK Interchange Network Limited and Voca Limited
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Financial Times
The Financial Times
Financial Times
(FT) is a Japanese-owned, English-language international daily newspaper with a special emphasis on business and economic news. The paper was founded in 1888 by James Sheridan and Horatio Bottomley, and merged in 1945 with its closest rival, the Financial News (which had been founded in 1884). The Financial Times
Financial Times
has an average daily readership of 2.2 million people worldwide (PwC audited figures, November 2011). FT.com has 4.5 million registered users and over 285,000 digital subscribers, as well as 600,000 paying users. FT Chinese has more than 1.7 million registered users.[2] The world editions of the Financial Times
Financial Times
newspaper had a combined average daily circulation of 234,193 copies (88,000 for the UK edition) in January 2014.[3] In February 2014 the combined sale of the world editions of the Financial Times was 224,000 copies
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Faster Payments Service
Faster Payments Service
Faster Payments Service
(FPS) is a UK banking initiative to reduce payment times between different banks' customer accounts from the three working days that transfers take using the long-established BACS system, to typically a few hours
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Royal Assent
Royal assent
Royal assent
or sanction is the method by which a country's monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation's parliament. In certain nations, such assent makes the act law (promulgation) while in other nations assent is distinct from promulgation. In the vast majority of contemporary monarchies, this act is considered to be little more than a formality; even in those nations which still permit their monarchs to withhold royal assent (such as the United Kingdom, Norway, and Liechtenstein), the monarch almost never does so, save in a dire political emergency or upon the advice of their government. While the power to withhold royal assent was once exercised often in European monarchies, it is exceedingly rare in the modern, democratic political atmosphere that has developed there since the 18th century. Royal assent
Royal assent
is sometimes associated with elaborate ceremonies
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Company Limited By Guarantee
In British and Irish company law, a company limited by guarantee (LBG) is an alternative type of corporation used primarily for non-profit organisations that require legal personality. A company limited by guarantee does not usually have a share capital or shareholders, but instead has members who act as guarantors. The guarantors give an undertaking to contribute a nominal amount (typically very small) in the event of the winding up of the company.[1] A company limited by guarantee can distribute its profits to its members, if allowed to by its articles of association,[2] but then it would not be eligible for charitable status. Limited companies can convert to a community interest company (CIC) which feature an asset lock which prevents the extraction of profits. Like a private company limited by shares, a company limited by guarantee must include the suffix "Limited" in its name, except in circumstances specifically excluded by law
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