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Filmstrip
The filmstrip was a common form of still image instructional multimedia, once commonly used by educators in primary and secondary schools (K-12), overtaken at the end of the 1980s by newer and increasingly lower-cost full-motion videocassettes and later on by DVDs. From the 1940s to 1980s, filmstrips provided an easy and inexpensive alternative to 16 mm educational films, requiring very little storage space and being very quick to rewind for the next use. Filmstrips were large and durable, and rarely needed splicing. They are still used in some areas.Contents1 Technology 2 Film production2.1 Home entertainment 2.2 Eastern Europe production3 Automatic film advance 4 Decline and obsolescence 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTechnology[edit] Filmstrip
Filmstrip
from S
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Gramophone Record
A phonograph record (also known as a gramophone record, especially in British English, or record) is an analog sound storage medium in the form of a flat disc with an inscribed, modulated spiral groove. The groove usually starts near the periphery and ends near the center of the disc. At first, the discs were commonly made from shellac; starting in the 1950s polyvinyl chloride became common. In recent decades, records have sometimes been called vinyl records, or simply vinyl, although this would exclude most records made until after World War II. The phonograph disc record was the primary medium used for music reproduction until late in the 20th century. It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and had effectively superseded it by around 1912. Records retained the largest market share even when new formats such as the compact cassette were mass-marketed
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The New York Times Company
Coordinates: 40°45′22″N 73°59′25″W / 40.75611°N 73.99028°W / 40.75611; -73.99028 The New York Times
The New York Times
CompanyTypePublicTraded as Class A Common Stock: NYSE: NYT S&P 400 Component Class B Common Stock: unlistedIndustry NewspapersFounded September 18, 1851; 166 years ago (1851-09-18)Founders Henry Jarvis Raymond George JonesHeadquarters The New York Times
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Video Cassette Recorder
A videocassette recorder, VCR, or video recorder is an electromechanical device that records analog audio and analog video from broadcast television or other source on a removable, magnetic tape videocassette, and can play back the recording. Use of a VCR to record a television program to play back at a more convenient time is commonly referred to as timeshifting. VCRs can also play back prerecorded tapes. In the 1980s and 1990s, prerecorded videotapes were widely available for purchase and rental, and blank tapes were sold to make recordings. Most domestic VCRs are equipped with a television broadcast receiver (tuner) for TV reception, and a programmable clock (timer) for unattended recording of a television channel from a start time to an end time specified by the user. These features began as simple mechanical counter-based single-event timers, but were later replaced by more flexible multiple-event digital clock timers
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General Electric
General Electric
General Electric
(GE) is an American multinational conglomerate incorporated in New York[5] and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts.[2] As of 2016, the company operates through the following segments: aviation, current, digital, energy connections, global research, healthcare, lighting, oil and gas, power, renewable energy, transportation, and capital which cater to the needs of financial services, medical devices, life sciences, pharmaceutical, automotive, software development and engineering industries.[6] In 2017, GE ranked among the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
as the thirteenth-largest firm in the U.S
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St. Charles, Illinois
St. Charles is a city[6] in DuPage and Kane counties in the U.S. state of Illinois. It lies roughly 40 miles (64 km) west of Chicago
Chicago
on Illinois
Illinois
Route 64. According to a U.S. Census Bureau estimate in July 2012, the city had a total population of 33,327.[7] The official city slogan is Pride of the Fox, after the Fox River that runs through the center of town. St
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LP Record
The LP (from "long playing"[1] or "long play") is an analog sound storage medium, a vinyl record format characterized by a speed of ​33 1⁄3 rpm, a 12- or 10-inch (30 or 25 cm) diameter, and use of the "microgroove" groove specification. Introduced by Columbia in 1948, it was soon adopted as a new standard by the entire record industry
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Hertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Home Economics
Home
Home
economics, domestic science or home science is a field of study that deals with the economics and management of the home, family and community.[1] It deals with the relationship between individuals, families, communities, and the environment in which they live.Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Practice homes in American colleges 2.2 American university departments3 By country3.1 Germany 3.2 South Korea 3.3 United States 3.4 Home
Home
science in India 3.5 United Kingdom4 Content4.1 Cleaning5 Professional associations 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksName[edit] Family and consumer science was previously known in the United States as home economics, often abbreviated "home ec" or "HE"
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Language Arts
Language
Language
Arts (also known as English Language
Language
Arts) is the study and improvement of the arts of language. Traditionally, the primary divisions in language arts are literature and language, where language in this case refers to both linguistics, and specific languages.[1] Language
Language
arts instruction typically consists of some mix of the components of reading, writing (composition), speaking, and listening[2]. In schools, language arts is taught alongside Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies.[3]Contents1 Reading 2 Composition 3 Speaking 4 Listening 5 See also 6 ReferencesReading[edit] Reading, by definition, is the ability and knowledge of a language that allows comprehension by grasping the meaning of written or printed characters, words, or sentences
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Compact Audio Cassette
The Compact Audio Cassette (CAC) or Musicassette (MC), also commonly called the cassette tape or simply tape or cassette, is an analog magnetic tape recording format for audio recording and playback. It was released by Philips
Philips
in 1963, having been developed in Hasselt, Belgium.[2] Compact cassettes come in two forms, either already containing content as a prerecorded cassette, or as a fully recordable "blank" cassette. Both forms are reversible by the user.[3] The compact cassette technology was originally designed for dictation machines, but improvements in fidelity led the Compact Cassette
Compact Cassette
to supplant the Stereo 8-track cartridge
8-track cartridge
and reel-to-reel tape recording in most non-professional applications.[4] Its uses ranged from portable audio to home recording to data storage for early microcomputers
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Still Image
An image (from Latin: imago) is an artifact that depicts visual perception, for example, a photo or a two-dimensional picture, that has a similar appearance to some subject—usually a physical object or a person, thus providing a depiction of it. People regard images for their documentary or evidentiary value, but also for their aspirational value, as they not only can depict what is, but they can also depict what can be[1]. Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Still or moving2 Imagery (literary term) 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Images may be two-dimensional, such as a photograph or screen display, or three-dimensional, such as a statue or hologram. They may be captured by optical devices – such as cameras, mirrors, lenses, telescopes, microscopes, etc
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Coronet Films
Coronet Films (also known as Coronet Instructional Media Inc.) was a leading producer and distributor of many American documentary shorts shown in public schools, mostly in the 16mm format, from the 1940s through the 1980s (when the videocassette recorder replaced the motion picture projector as the key audio-visual aid). The company, whose library is owned and distributed by the Phoenix Learning Group, Inc., covered a wide range of subjects in zoology, science, geography, history and math, but is mostly remembered today for its post-World War II social guidance films featuring topics such as dating, family life, courtesy, and citizenship.Contents1 Overview 2 Personal guidance films 3 Films 4 Production 5 References 6 Notes 7 External linksOverview[edit] David A. Smart established the company with his brothers Alfred and John in 1934,[1] but the first titles registered for copyright date from 1941 (beginning with Aptitudes and Occupations)
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CBS
CBS
CBS
(an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language
English language
commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation. The company is headquartered at the CBS Building
CBS Building
in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS
CBS
Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS
CBS
Television City and the CBS
CBS
Studio Center). CBS
CBS
is sometimes referred to as the "Eye Network", in reference to the company's iconic logo, in use since 1951. It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of CBS programming during the tenure of William S
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Cassette Tape
The Compact Audio Cassette (CAC) or Musicassette (MC), also commonly called the cassette tape or simply tape or cassette, is an analog magnetic tape recording format for audio recording and playback. It was released by Philips
Philips
in 1963, having been developed in Hasselt, Belgium.[2] Compact cassettes come in two forms, either already containing content as a prerecorded cassette, or as a fully recordable "blank" cassette. Both forms are reversible by the user.[3] The compact cassette technology was originally designed for dictation machines, but improvements in fidelity led the Compact Cassette
Compact Cassette
to supplant the Stereo 8-track cartridge
8-track cartridge
and reel-to-reel tape recording in most non-professional applications.[4] Its uses ranged from portable audio to home recording to data storage for early microcomputers
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Revolutions Per Minute
Revolutions per minute (abbreviated rpm, RPM, rev/min, r/min) is a measure of the frequency of rotation, specifically the number of rotations around a fixed axis in one minute. It is used as a measure of rotational speed of a mechanical component. In the French language, tr/min (tours par minute) is the common abbreviation. The German language uses the abbreviation U/min or u/min (Umdrehungen pro Minute).Contents1 International System of Units 2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesInternational System of Units[edit] According to the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), rpm is not a unit. This is because the word revolution is a semantic annotation rather than a unit. The annotation is instead done as a subscript of the formula sign if needed. Because of the measured physical quantity, the formula sign has to be f for (rotational) frequency and ω or Ω for angular velocity
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