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Fighter Aircraft
A FIGHTER AIRCRAFT is a military aircraft designed primarily for air-to-air combat against other aircraft, as opposed to bombers and attack aircraft , whose main mission is to attack ground targets. The hallmarks of a fighter are its speed, maneuverability, and small size relative to other combat aircraft. Many fighters have secondary ground-attack capabilities, and some are designed as dual-purpose fighter-bombers ; often aircraft that do not fulfill the standard definition are called fighters. This may be for political or national security reasons, for advertising purposes, or other reasons. A fighter's main purpose is to establish air superiority over a battlefield. Since World War I , achieving and maintaining air superiority has been considered essential for victory in conventional warfare . The success or failure of a belligerent's efforts to gain air supremacy hinges on several factors including the skill of its pilots, the tactical soundness of its doctrine for deploying its fighters, and the numbers and performance of those fighters. Because of the importance of air superiority, since the dawn of aerial combat armed forces have constantly competed to develop technologically superior fighters and to deploy these fighters in greater numbers, and fielding a viable fighter fleet consumes a substantial proportion of the defense budgets of modern armed forces
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Jet Fighter (other)
A JET FIGHTER is a military aircraft designed primarily for air-to-air combat with other aircraft JET FIGHTER(S) or JETFIGHTER(S) may also refer to: * Jet Fighter (arcade game) (1975), 2 player arcade game by Atari * Jet Fighters (video game) , MMO application for Apple iPhone OS * Jetfighter (series) (1988), 3D combat flight simulator computer games from Velocity DevelopmentSEE ALSO * Jet (other) * Fighter (other) * List of fighter aircraft * Jet aircraft This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title JET FIGHTER. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jet_fighter_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Lockheed P-38 Lightning
The LOCKHEED P-38 LIGHTNING is a World War II
World War II
-era American piston-engined fighter aircraft . Developed to a United States
United States
Army Air Corps requirement, the P-38 had distinctive twin booms and a central nacelle containing the cockpit and armament. Allied propaganda claimed it had been nicknamed the fork-tailed devil (German : der Gabelschwanz-Teufel) by the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
and "two planes, one pilot" (2飛行機、1パイロット, Ni hikōki, ippairotto) by the Japanese. The P-38 was used for interception, dive bombing , level bombing , ground attack , night fighting , photo reconnaissance , radar and visual pathfinding for bombers and evacuation missions, and extensively as a long-range escort fighter when equipped with drop tanks under its wings. The P-38 was used most successfully in the Pacific Theater of Operations and the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as the aircraft of America's top aces , Richard Bong (40 victories), Thomas McGuire (38 victories) and Charles H. MacDonald (27 victories). In the South West Pacific theater , the P-38 was the primary long-range fighter of United States
United States
Army Air Forces until the appearance of large numbers of P-51D Mustangs toward the end of the war. The P-38 was unusually quiet for a fighter, the exhaust muffled by the turbo-superchargers
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North American F-86 Sabre
The NORTH AMERICAN F-86 SABRE, sometimes called the SABREJET, is a transonic jet fighter aircraft . Produced by North American Aviation , the Sabre is best known as the United States' first swept wing fighter that could counter the similarly-winged Soviet MiG-15 in high-speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War (1950–1953). Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in that war, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras. Although it was developed in the late 1940s and was outdated by the end of the '50s, the Sabre proved versatile and adaptable and continued as a front-line fighter in numerous air forces until the last active operational examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994. Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the United States, Japan, and Italy. Variants were built in Canada
Canada
and Australia. The Canadair
Canadair
Sabre added another 1,815 airframes, and the significantly redesigned CAC Sabre (sometimes known as the Avon Sabre or CAC CA-27), had a production run of 112. The Sabre was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units
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Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor
The LOCKHEED MARTIN F-22 RAPTOR is a fifth-generation , single-seat, twin-engine , all-weather stealth tactical fighter aircraft developed for the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(USAF). The result of the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter program, the aircraft was designed primarily as an air superiority fighter , but also has ground attack , electronic warfare , and signal intelligence capabilities. The prime contractor, Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
, built most of the F-22's airframe and weapons systems and did its final assembly, while Boeing
Boeing
provided the wings, aft fuselage, avionics integration, and training systems. The aircraft was variously designated F-22 and F/A-22 before it formally entered service in December 2005 as the F-22A. After a protracted development and despite operational issues, the USAF considers the F-22 critical to its tactical air power, and says that the aircraft is unmatched by any known or projected fighter. The Raptor's combination of stealth, aerodynamic performance, and situational awareness gives the aircraft unprecedented air combat capabilities. The high cost of the aircraft, a lack of clear air-to-air missions due to delays in Russian and Chinese fighter programs, a ban on exports, and development of the more versatile F-35 led to the end of F-22 production
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Military Aircraft
A MILITARY AIRCRAFT is any fixed-wing or rotary-wing aircraft that is operated by a legal or insurrectionary armed service of any type. Military aircraft can be either combat or non-combat: * Combat aircraft are designed to destroy enemy equipment using their own aircraft ordnance . Combat aircraft are normally developed and procured only by military forces . * Non-combat aircraft are not designed for combat as their primary function, but may carry weapons for self-defense. These mainly operate in support roles, and may be developed by either military forces or civilian organizations.CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Combat aircraft * 2.1 Fighter aircraft * 2.2 Bomber aircraft * 2.3 Attack aircraft * 2.4 Electronic warfare aircraft * 2.5 Maritime patrol aircraft * 2.6 Multirole combat aircraft * 3 Non-combat aircraft * 3.1 Military transport aircraft * 3.2 Airborne early warning and control * 3.3 Reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft * 3.4 Experimental aircraft * 4 See also * 5 References HISTORY _ THIS SECTION NEEDS EXPANSION. You can help by adding to it . (July 2017)_In 1783, when the first practical aircraft (hot-air and hydrogen balloons) were established, they were quickly adopted for military duties. COMBAT AIRCRAFT _ THIS SECTION NEEDS EXPANSION
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Bomber
A BOMBER is a combat aircraft designed to attack ground and sea targets by dropping air-to-ground weaponry , firing torpedoes or deploying air-launched cruise missiles . CONTENTS* 1 Classification * 1.1 Strategic * 1.2 Tactical * 2 History * 2.1 The first bombers * 2.2 Strategic bombing * 2.3 World War II * 2.4 Cold War * 2.5 Modern era * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links CLASSIFICATION A Russian Tupolev Tu-160 strategic bomber. STRATEGIC Further information: Carpet bombing and Strategic bomber Strategic bombing is done by heavy bombers primarily designed for long-range bombing missions against strategic targets such as supply bases, bridges, factories, shipyards, and cities themselves, in order to diminish the enemy's ability to wage war by limiting access to resources through crippling infrastructure or reducing industrial output. Current examples include the strategic nuclear-armed strategic bombers : B-2 Spirit , B-52 Stratofortress , Tupolev Tu-95 'Bear', Tupolev Tu-22M 'Backfire'; historically notable examples are the: Gotha G.IV , Avro Lancaster , Heinkel He-111 , Junkers Ju 88 , Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress , Consolidated B-24 Liberator , Boeing B-29 Superfortress , and Tupolev Tu-16 'Badger'
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Ground-attack Aircraft
An ATTACK AIRCRAFT, STRIKE AIRCRAFT, or ATTACK BOMBER, is a tactical military aircraft that has a primary role of carrying out airstrikes with greater precision than bombers , and is prepared to encounter strong low-level air defenses while pressing the attack. This class of aircraft is designed mostly for close air support and naval air-to-surface missions, overlapping the tactical bomber mission. Designs dedicated to non-naval roles are often known as GROUND-ATTACK AIRCRAFT. Fighter aircraft
Fighter aircraft
often carry out the attack role, although they would not be considered attack aircraft _per se_, although fighter-bomber conversions of those same aircraft would be considered part of the class. Strike fighters , which have effectively replaced the fighter-bomber and light bomber concepts, also differ little from the broad concept of an attack aircraft. The dedicated attack aircraft as a separate class existed primarily during and after World War II
World War II
. The precise implementation varied from country to country, and was handled by a wide variety of designs. In the US and UK, attack aircraft were generally based on light bombers , sometimes carrying heavier forward-firing weapons like the B-25G and Mosquito Tsetse
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Fighter-bomber
A FIGHTER-BOMBER is a fighter aircraft that has been modified, or used primarily, as a light bomber or attack aircraft . It differs from bomber and attack aircraft primarily in its origins, as a fighter that has been adapted into other roles, whereas bombers and attack aircraft are developed specifically for bombing and attack roles. Although still used, the term fighter-bomber has less significance since the introduction of rockets and guided missiles into aerial warfare . Modern aircraft with similar duties are now typically called multirole combat aircraft or strike fighters . CONTENTS * 1 Development * 2 First World War * 3 Second World War * 4 Korean War * 5 Post-war * 6 See also * 7 References DEVELOPMENT A Supermarine Spitfire
Supermarine Spitfire
Mk. IX in Longues-sur-Mer , Normandy (1944). It carries a 500 lb bomb under the fuselage and a 250 lb bomb under each wing. The F-series models of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 were specifically adapted for the fighter-bomber role. Prior to World War II
World War II
, general limitations in available engine and aeronautical technology required that each proposed military aircraft have its design tailored to a specific prescribed role. Engine power grew dramatically during the early period of the war, roughly doubling between 1939 and 1943
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Air Supremacy
AIR SUPREMACY is a position in war where a side holds complete control of air warfare and air power over opposing forces. It is defined by NATO
NATO
and the United States Department of Defense as the "degree of air superiority wherein the opposing air force is incapable of effective interference." CONTENTS * 1 Types * 2 World War
War
I * 3 Interwar period * 4 World War
War
II * 5 After World War
War
II * 5.1 Israel-Arab Conflict and Wars * 5.1.1 1948 War
War
* 5.1.2 1956 War
War
* 5.1.3 1967 War
War
* 5.1.4 War
War
of Attrition * 5.1.5 1973 War
War
* 5.1.6 1978 Lebanon
Lebanon
Conflict * 5.1.7 1982 Lebanon
Lebanon
Invasion * 5.2 Korean and Vietnam Wars * 5.3 India and Pakistan
Pakistan
* 5.4 1980s to present * 6 Methods * 7 See also * 8 Notes * 9 References * 10 External links TYPESThere are three levels of control of the air: * AIR SUPREMACY is the highest level, where a side holds complete control of the skies. * AIR SUPERIORITY is the second level, where a side is in a more favorable position than the opponent. It is defined in the NATO glossary as the "degree of dominance in air battle ..
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World War I
Allied victory (exception: Russian defeat) * Fall of the German , Russian , Ottoman , and Austro-Hungarian empires * Russian Civil War and foundation of Soviet Union * Formation of new countries in Europe and the Middle East * Transfer of German colonies and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers * Establishment of the League of Nations . (more... ) BELLIGERENTSALLIED POWERS France British Empire Russia (until 1917) Serbia Montenegro Belgium Japan Italy (1915–18) Portugal (1916–18) Romania (1916–18) Hejaz (1916–18) United States (1917–18) Greece (1917–18) Siam (1917–18) ..._and others_ CENTRAL POWERS German Empire Austria-Hungary Ottoman Empire Bulgaria (1915–18) ..._and co-belligerents_ COMMANDERS AND LEADERSALLIED LEADERS Georges Clemenceau Raymond Poincaré H. H
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Conventional Warfare
CONVENTIONAL WARFARE is a form of warfare conducted by using conventional weapons and battlefield tactics between two or more states in open confrontation. The forces on each side are well-defined, and fight using weapons that primarily target the opponent's military. It is normally fought using conventional weapons, and not with chemical , biological , or nuclear weapons . The general purpose of conventional warfare is to weaken or destroy the opponent's military, thereby negating its ability to engage in conventional warfare. In forcing capitulation , however, one or both sides may eventually resort to unconventional warfare tactics. CONTENTS * 1 Formation of the state * 2 The Clausewitzian paradigm * 3 Prevalence * 4 Decline * 5 Replacement * 6 See also * 7 Footnotes * 8 External links FORMATION OF THE STATE For more details on this topic, see State formation . The state was first advocated by Plato , then found more acceptance in the consolidation of power under the Roman Catholic Church . European monarchs then gained power as the Catholic Church was stripped of temporal power and was replaced by the divine right of kings . In 1648, the powers of Europe signed the Treaty of Westphalia which ended the religious violence for purely political governance and outlook, signifying the birth of the modern 'state'
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Royal Flying Corps
The ROYAL FLYING CORPS (RFC) was the air arm of the British Army before and during the First World War , until it merged with the Royal Naval Air Service on 1 April 1918 to form the Royal Air Force . During the early part of the war, the RFC supported the British Army by artillery co-operation and photographic reconnaissance . This work gradually led RFC pilots into aerial battles with German pilots and later in the war included the strafing of enemy infantry and emplacements , the bombing of German military airfields and later the strategic bombing of German industrial and transport facilities. At the start of World War I the RFC, commanded by Brigadier-General Sir David Henderson , consisted of five squadrons – one observation balloon squadron (RFC No 1 Squadron) and four aeroplane squadrons. These were first used for aerial spotting on 13 September 1914 but only became efficient when they perfected the use of wireless communication at Aubers Ridge on 9 May 1915. Aerial photography was attempted during 1914, but again only became effective the next year. By 1918, photographic images could be taken from 15,000 feet and were interpreted by over 3,000 personnel
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Royal Air Force
The ROYAL AIR FORCE (RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force . Formed towards the end of the First World War
First World War
on 1 April 1918, it is the oldest independent air force in the world. Following victory over the Central Powers
Central Powers
in 1918 the RAF emerged as, at the time, the largest air force in the world. Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history , in particular, playing a large part in the Second World War
Second World War
where it fought its most famous campaign, the Battle of Britain
Battle of Britain
. The RAF's mission is to support the objectives of the British Ministry of Defence (MoD), which are to "provide the capabilities needed: to ensure the security and defence of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and overseas territories, including against terrorism; to support the Government’s foreign policy objectives particularly in promoting international peace and security". The RAF describe its mission statement as "... An _agile_, _adaptable_ and _capable_ Air Force that, person for person, is second to none, and that makes a decisive air power contribution in support of the UK Defence Mission". The mission statement is supported by the RAF's definition of air power , which guides its strategy
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Scout (aircraft)
The term SCOUT, as a description of a class of military aircraft, came into use shortly before the First World War , and initially referred to a fast (for its time), light (usually single-seated) unarmed reconnaissance aircraft. "Scout" types were generally adaptations of pre-war racing aircraft – although at least one (the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2 ) was specifically designed for the role. At this stage the possibility of air-to-air combat was considered highly speculative, and the speed of these aircraft relative to their contemporaries was seen as an advantage in gaining immunity from ground fire and in the ability to deliver timely reconnaissance reports. Almost from the beginning of the war, various experiments were carried out in the fitting of armament to scouts to enable them to engage in air-to-air combat – by early 1916 several types of scout could fire a machine gun forwards, in the line of flight, thus becoming the first effective single-seat fighters – in effect, an entirely new class of aircraft. In French and German usage these types were termed "hunters" (chasseur, Jäger), but in the Royal Flying Corps and early Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
parlance "scout" remained the usual term for a single-seat fighter into the early 1920s
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U.S. Army
U.S. Department of Defense * Dept. of the Army
Army
(since 1947) HEADQUARTERS The Pentagon
The Pentagon
Arlington County, Virginia
Arlington County, Virginia
, U.S
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