HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fiat A.74
The Fiat
Fiat
A.74 was a two-row, fourteen-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine produced in Italy in the 1930s as a powerplant for aircraft. It was used in some of Italy's most important aircraft of World War II.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (A.74)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] The A.74 was important in that it marked a transition for Fiat
Fiat
from liquid-cooled inline engines, to large air-cooled radial engines. Fiat had made a number of smaller radial air engines over the years but the A.74 marked a major increase in power and size. The A.74 family was widely produced and spawned a number of related engines such as the A.76, A.80, and A.82. Each successive generation being larger and more powerful than the previous
[...More...]

"Fiat A.74" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Radial Engine
The radial engine is a reciprocating type internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders "radiate" outward from a central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel. It resembles a stylized star when viewed from the front, and is called a "star engine" (German Sternmotor, French moteur en étoile, Japanese hoshigata enjin, Italian Motore Stellare) in some languages
[...More...]

"Radial Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kingdom Of Italy
The Kingdom of Italy
Italy
(Italian: Regno d'Italia) was a state which existed from 1861—when King Victor Emmanuel II
King Victor Emmanuel II
of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy—until 1946—when a constitutional referendum led civil discontent to abandon the monarchy and form the Italian Republic. The state was founded as a result of the unification of Italy
Italy
under the influence of the Kingdom of Sardinia, which can be considered its legal predecessor state. Italy
Italy
declared war on Austria in alliance with Prussia in 1866 and received the region of Veneto
Veneto
following their victory. Italian troops entered Rome
Rome
in 1870, ending more than one thousand years of Papal temporal power
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Italy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Reciprocating Engine
A reciprocating engine, also often known as a piston engine, is typically a heat engine (although there are also pneumatic and hydraulic reciprocating engines) that uses one or more reciprocating pistons to convert pressure into a rotating motion. This article describes the common features of all types. The main types are: the internal combustion engine, used extensively in motor vehicles; the steam engine, the mainstay of the Industrial Revolution; and the niche application Stirling engine
[...More...]

"Reciprocating Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Power-to-weight Ratio
Power-to-weight ratio (or specific power or power-to-mass ratio) is a calculation commonly applied to engines and mobile power sources to enable the comparison of one unit or design to another. Power-to-weight ratio is a measurement of actual performance of any engine or power source. It is also used as a measurement of performance of a vehicle as a whole, with the engine's power output being divided by the weight (or mass) of the vehicle, to give a metric that is independent of the vehicle's size. Power-to-weight is often quoted by manufacturers at the peak value, but the actual value may vary in use and variations will affect performance. The inverse of power-to-weight, weight-to-power ratio (power loading) is a calculation commonly applied to aircraft, cars, and vehicles in general, to enable the comparison of one vehicle's performance to another
[...More...]

"Power-to-weight Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
[...More...]

"Compression Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Bendix-Stromberg Pressure Carburetor
Of the three types of carburetors used on large, high-performance aircraft engines manufactured in the United States during World War II, the Bendix-Stromberg pressure carburetor was the one most commonly found. The other two carburetor types were manufactured by Chandler Groves (later Holley Carburetor Company) and Chandler Evans Control Systems (CECO). Both of these types of carburetors had a relatively large number of internal parts, and in the case of the Holley Carburetor, there were complications in its "variable venturi" design. A floatless pressure carburetor is a type of aircraft fuel control that provides very accurate fuel delivery, prevents ice from forming in the carburetor and prevents fuel starvation during negative "G" and inverted flight by eliminating the customary float-controlled fuel inlet valve
[...More...]

"Bendix-Stromberg Pressure Carburetor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Valvetrain
A valve train or valvetrain is a mechanical system that controls operation of the valves in an internal combustion engine,[1] in which a sequence of components transmits motion throughout the assembly
[...More...]

"Valvetrain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
[...More...]

"Aircraft Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Turbine Engines
A turbine (from the Latin
Latin
turbo, a vortex, related to the Greek τύρβη, tyrbē, meaning "turbulence")[1][2] is a rotary mechanical device that extracts energy from a fluid flow and converts it into useful work. The work produced by a turbine can be used for generating electrical power when combined with a generator or producing thrust, as in the case of jet engines.[3] A turbine is a turbomachine with at least one moving part called a rotor assembly, which is a shaft or drum with blades attached. Moving fluid acts on the blades so that they move and impart rotational energy to the rotor. Early turbine examples are windmills and waterwheels. Gas, steam, and water turbines have a casing around the blades that contains and controls the working fluid
[...More...]

"Turbine Engines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiat
Fiat
Fiat
Automobiles S.p.A. (English: /ˈfiːɑːt/; originally FIAT, Italian: Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino, lit. 'Italian Automobiles Factory, Turin') is the largest automobile manufacturer in Italy, a subsidiary of FCA Italy S.p.A., which is part of Fiat Chrysler
Chrysler
Automobiles. Fiat
Fiat
Automobiles S.p.A
[...More...]

"Fiat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiat A.25
The Fiat A.25
Fiat A.25
was an Italian water-cooled aircraft engine from the 1920s. It produced 708 kW (950 hp) and was used by the Regia Aeronautica for fifteen years to power their Fiat BR.2 and BR.3 bombers.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Applications 4 Specifications4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] During the 1920s Fiat introduced several water-cooled aircraft engines, including the A.20, A.22, A24, A.25 and A.30. They were all upright V-12s with 60° between the cylinder banks; capacities ranged between 18.7 L and 54.5 L (1,141-3,324 cu in) and power outputs between 320 kW and 745 kW (430-1,000 hp).[1] Producing 710 kW (950 hp) from 54.5 L (3,324 cu in),[2] the A.25 was the largest and most powerful in the range
[...More...]

"Fiat A.25" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiat A.24
The Fiat A.24
Fiat A.24
was an Italian water-cooled aircraft engine from the 1920s, built in modest numbers. It produced 520 kW (700 hp).Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (A.24R)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] During the second half of the 1920s Fiat introduced several water-cooled aircraft engines, including the A.20, A.22, A24, A.25 and A.30.[1] They were all upright V-12s with 60° between the cylinder banks; capacities ranged between 18.7 L and 54.5 L (1,141-3,326 cu in) and power outputs between 320 kW and 745 kW (430-1,000 hp).[1][2] Producing 520 kW (700 hp) from 32.3 L (1,971 cu in), the A.24 was towards the centre of this range
[...More...]

"Fiat A.24" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiat A.30
The Fiat A.30
Fiat A.30
R.A. was an Italian water-cooled aircraft engine from the 1920s, built in large numbers and serving with several air forces up to the beginning of World War II. It produced 447 kW (600 hp).Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (A.30 R.A.)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] During the second half of the 1920s Fiat introduced several water-cooled aircraft engines, including the A.20, A.23, A.24, A.25 and A.30.[1] They were all upright V-12s with 60° between the cylinder banks; capacities ranged between 18.7 L and 54.5 L (1,141-3,326 cu in) and power outputs between 320 kW and 745 kW (430-1,000 hp). Producing 447 kW (600 hp) from 24.0 L (1,464 cu in), the A.30RA was towards the low power end of these ranges
[...More...]

"Fiat A.30" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fiat A.50
The Fiat
Fiat
A.50 was a seven-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine for aircraft use built in Italy
Italy
in the 1930s
[...More...]

"Fiat A.50" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.