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Fencing (sport)
Fencing
Fencing
is a group of three related combat sports. The three disciplines in modern fencing are the foil, the épée, and the sabre; winning points are made through the contact with an opponent. A fourth discipline, singlestick, appeared in the 1904 Olympics but was dropped after that, and is not a part of modern fencing. Fencing
Fencing
was one of the first sports to be played in the Olympics. Based on the traditional skills of swordsmanship, the modern sport arose at the end of the 19th century, with the Italian school having modified the historical European martial art of classical fencing, and the French school later refining the Italian system. There are three forms of modern fencing, each uses a different kind of weapon and has different rules, this way the sport itself is divided into three competitive scenes: foil, épée, and sabre
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Fence
A fence is a structure that encloses an area, typically outdoors, and is usually constructed from posts that are connected by boards, wire, rails or netting.[1] A fence differs from a wall in not having a solid foundation along its whole length.[2] Alternatives to fencing include a ditch (sometimes filled with water, forming a moat).Contents1 Types1.1 By function 1.2 By construction2 Requirement of use 3 Legal issues3.1 History 3.2 United Kingdom 3.3 United States4 Cultural value of fences 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksTypes[edit]Typical agricultural barbed wire fencing.Split-rail fencing common in timber-rich areas.A chain-link wire fence surrounding a field.Portable metal fences around a construction site.A snow-covered vaccary fence near Ramsbottom in Greater Manchester, UKBy function[edit]Agricultural fencing, to keep livestock in and/or predators out Acoustic fencing
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Health
Health
Health
is the ability of a biological system to acquire, convert, allocate, distribute, and utilize the energy with maximum efficiency. The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) defined human health in a broader sense in its 1948 constitution as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, in particular as lacking operational value, the ambiguity in developing cohesive health strategies, and because of the problem created by use of the word "complete", which makes it practically impossible to achieve.[3][4][5] Other definitions have been proposed, among which a recent definition that correlates health and personal satisfaction.[6] [7] An alternative approach focuses on avoiding definitions, which demand precise descriptions of the term
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The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Merry Wives of Windsor
The Merry Wives of Windsor
is a comedy by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
first published in 1602, though believed to have been written in or before 1597. The Windsor of the play's title is a reference to the town of Windsor, also the location of Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, England. Though nominally set in the reign of Henry IV, the play makes no pretense to exist outside contemporary Elizabethan era
Elizabethan era
English middle class life. It features the character Sir John Falstaff, the fat knight who had previously been featured in Henry IV, Part 1
Henry IV, Part 1
and Part 2. It has been adapted for the opera on several occasions
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Domenico Angelo
Domenico Angelo
Domenico Angelo
(1717 Leghorn, Italy[1]–1802), was an Italian sword and fencing master, also known as Angelo Domenico Malevolti Tremamondo. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, "Angelo was the first to emphasize fencing as a means of developing health, poise, and grace. As a result of his insight and influence, fencing changed from an art of war to a sport." It also calls his treatise, L’École des armes (1763; The School of Fencing) a "classic".[2]Contents1 Fencing schools 2 Family 3 Death 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksFencing schools[edit] Soon after arriving in England he established Angelo's School of Arms in Carlisle House, Soho, London.[3] There he taught the aristocracy the fashionable art of Swordsmanship
Swordsmanship
which they had previously had to go the continent to learn, and also set up a riding school in the former rear garden of the house. He was fencing instructor to the Royal Family
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Soho
SoHo, sometimes written Soho,[2] is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which in recent history came to the public's attention for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, but is now better known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socioeconomic, cultural, political, and architectural developments.[3] The name "SoHo" refers to the area being "South of Houston Street", and was also a reference to Soho, an area in London's West End.[4] It was coined by Chester Rapkin,[5] an urban planner and author of The South Houston Industrial Area study,[6] also known as the "Rapkin Report"
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Aristocracy
Aristocracy (Greek ἀριστοκρατία aristokratía, from ἄριστος aristos "excellent", and κράτος kratos "power") is a form of government that places power in the hands of a small, privileged ruling class.[1] The term derives from the Greek aristokratia, meaning "rule of the best".[2] The term is synonymous with hereditary government, and hereditary succession is its primary philosophy, after which the hereditary monarch appoints officers as they see fit. At the time of the word's origins in ancient Greece, the Greeks conceived it as rule by the best qualified citizens—and often contrasted it favourably with monarchy, rule by an individual
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Human Position
Human positions refer to the different physical configurations that the human body can take.The human body is capable of a wide variety of positions, as exemplified by this energetic yoga poseThere are several synonyms that refer to human positioning, often used interchangeably, but having specific nuances of meaning.[1]Position is a general term for a configuration of the human body Posture means an intentionally or habitually assumed position Pose implies artistic or aesthetic intention of the position Attitude refers to postures assumed for purpose of imitation, intentional or not, as well as in some standard collocations in reference to some distinguished types of posture: " Freud
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Footwork (martial Arts)
Footwork is a martial arts and combat sports term for the general usage of the legs and feet in stand-up fighting. Footwork involves keeping balance, closing or furthering the distance, controlling spatial positioning, and/or creating additional momentum for strikes.Contents1 Basic incarnations of footwork1.1 Boxing
Boxing
footwork 1.2 Linear footwork 1.3 Triangular footwork 1.4 Circular footwork 1.5 Unconventional footwork 1.6 Footwork and weaponry2 See also 3 ReferencesBasic incarnations of footwork[edit] Boxing
Boxing
footwork[edit] The characteristic footwork employed by most of the world's major boxing and kickboxing styles such as Western boxing and Muay Thai
Muay Thai
has changed little over the centuries, and has remained largely invariable between radically different cultures. The boxer relies on 'push stepping'
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Sport Fencing
Fencing is a group of three related combat sports. The three disciplines in modern fencing are the foil, the épée, and the sabre; winning points are made through the contact with an opponent. A fourth discipline, singlestick, appeared in the 1904 Olympics but was dropped after that, and is not a part of modern fencing. Fencing was one of the first sports to be played in the Olympics. Based on the traditional skills of swordsmanship, the modern sport arose at the end of the 19th century, with the Italian school having modified the historical European martial art of classical fencing, and the French school later refining the Italian system. There are three forms of modern fencing, each uses a different kind of weapon and has different rules, this way the sport itself is divided into three competitive scenes: foil, épée, and sabre
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Parry (fencing)
A parry is a fencing bladework maneuver intended to deflect or block an incoming attack. Jérémy Cadot
Jérémy Cadot
(on the left) parries the flèche attack from Andrea Baldini during the final of the Challenge international de Paris.Contents1 Execution 2 Use 3 Classification 4 References 5 External linksExecution[edit] To execute a parry, fencers strike the opponent's foible, or the area near the tip of the blade, with their forte, or the part of the blade near the bell guard (or handle) of the weapon. This deflects the opponent's blade away from them, protecting them and placing them in a good position to strike back
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Royal Tournament
The Royal Tournament was the world's largest military tattoo and pageant, held by the British Armed Forces
British Armed Forces
annually between 1880 and 1999. The venue was originally the Royal Agricultural Hall
Royal Agricultural Hall
and latterly the Earls Court Exhibition Centre. In its later years it also acted as a fundraising event for leading forces charities, such as The Royal British Legion.Contents1 History 2 Post World War II 3 Comeback as the British Military Tournament3.1 The End4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Grand Military Tournament and Assault at Arms was held at the former Royal Agricultural Hall, in Islington
Islington
from 21 to 26 June 1880. The Tournament was effectively a series of competitions contested by the officers and men of the regular and auxiliary units of the British Army
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Fencing (other)
A fence is a barrier enclosing or bordering a field, yard, etc., usually made of posts and wire or wood, used to prevent entrance, to confine, or to mark a boundary. Fence, fences or fencing may also refer to:Contents1 Science and technology1.1 Computing2 Entertainment2.1 Music3 Places 4 Sport 5 Historical 6 Other usesScience and technology[edit]Fence (mathematics), partially ordered set formed by an alternating sequence of order relations Fence (statistics), value beyond which an observation is considered an outlier Fence lizard (other), two species of spiny lizard Air Force Space Surveillance System, radar system for tracking spacecraft, commonly known as "The Fence" Fencing response, a peculiar position of the arms following a concussionComputing[edit]Fence instruction, a computer operation for enforcing sequel memory operations Fences (software), desktop utility for Windows computers by Stardock Fencing
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Royal Agricultural Hall
The Business Design Centre is a Grade II listed building, which was originally opened as the Royal Agricultural Hall
Royal Agricultural Hall
in 1862 in the district of Islington
Islington
in London, England, for holding agricultural shows. It was the home of the Royal Smithfield Club's Smithfield Show from 1862 to 1938.[1] It hosted the Royal Tournament from its inauguration in 1880 until the event became too large for the venue and moved to Olympia in the early years of the 20th century. It hosted the first Crufts
Crufts
dog show in 1891. During the Second World War, the hall was commandeered by the Government, and from 1943, following the destruction of Mount Pleasant sorting office in an air raid, the Parcels Depot was moved to the hall
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Islington
Islington
Islington
(/ˈɪzlɪŋtən/) is a district in Greater London, England, and part of the London Borough of Islington
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