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Federation Of Damanhur
The Federation of Damanhur, often called simply Damanhur, is a commune, ecovillage, and spiritual community situated in the Piedmont region of northern Italy
Italy
about 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of the city of Turin. It is located in the foothills of the Alps
Alps
in the Chiusella Valley, bordering on the Gran Paradiso National Park. The community has its own constitution and currency, the Credito. Damanhur
Damanhur
is named after the Egyptian city of Damanhur
Damanhur
which was the site of a temple dedicated to Horus. It was founded in 1975 by Oberto Airaudi with around 24 followers, and by 2000 the number had grown to 800. The group holds a mix of New Age and neopagan beliefs
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Damanhur
Damanhur
Damanhur
(Egyptian Arabic: دمنهور‎ Damanhūr , IPA: [dɑmɑnˈhuːɾ]; Egyptian: Dmỉ-n-Ḥr.w ; Coptic: Ⲡⲓϯⲙⲓⲛ̀ϩⲱⲣ Pitimienhōr; Ancient Greek: Ἑρμοῦ πόλις μικρά Hermopolis Mikra) is a city in Lower Egypt, and the capital of the Beheira Governorate. It is located 160 km (99 mi) northwest of Cairo, and 70 km (43 mi) E.S.E. of Alexandria, in the middle of the western Nile
Nile
Delta. In Ancient Egypt, the city was the capital of Lower Egypt's 7th Nome of A-ment. It stood on the banks of a canal which connected the lake Mareotis
Mareotis
with the Canopic
Canopic
or most westerly arm of the Nile.[1] The city was dedicated to the Ancient Egyptian god Horus
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Celtic Neopaganism
Celtic Neopaganism
Neopaganism
refers to Contemporary Pagan or contemporary polytheist movements based on Celtic polytheism.Contents1 Types of Celtic Neopaganism1.1 Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism 1.2 Celtic Neoshamanism 1.3 Celtic Wicca 1.4 Neo-Druidism2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksTypes of Celtic Neopaganism[edit] Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
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Goddess Movement
The Goddess
Goddess
movement includes spiritual beliefs or practices (chiefly neopagan) which has emerged predominantly in North America, Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand in the 1970s. The movement grew as a reaction to perceptions of predominant organized religion as male-dominated, and makes use of goddess worship and a focus on gender and femininity. The Goddess
Goddess
movement is a widespread, non-centralized trend in neopaganism, and therefore has no centralized tenets of belief. Practices vary widely, from the name and number of goddesses worshipped to the specific rituals and rites used to do so. Some, such as Dianic
Dianic
Wicca, exclusively worship female deities, while others do not. Belief systems range from monotheistic to polytheism to pantheistic, encompassing a range of theological variety similar to that in the broader neopagan community
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Neo-Druidism
Druidry, sometimes termed Druidism, is a spiritual or religious movement that generally promotes harmony, connection, and reverence for the natural world. This commonly is extended to include respect for all beings, including the environment itself. Many forms of modern Druidry are modern Pagan religions, although most of the earliest modern Druids
Druids
identified as Christians
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Ringing Cedars' Anastasianism
Clusters of deities Identity and political philosophy Critique of mono-ideologiesOrganisationCalendars and holidays Volkhv
Volkhv
priesthoodReligious institutions:Native Polish ChurchRodnover ConfederationRodzima WiaraUnion of Slavic Native Belief CommunitiesDenominationsAssianismNative Ukrainian National FaithPeterburgian VedismYnglismNot strictly related ones:IvanovismRerikhismRinging Cedars' AnastasianismSpread
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Wicca
Wicca
Wicca
(English: /ˈwɪkə/), also termed Pagan Witchcraft, is a contemporary Pagan new religious movement. It was developed in England during the first half of the 20th century and was introduced to the public in 1954 by Gerald Gardner, a retired British civil servant. Wicca
Wicca
draws upon a diverse set of ancient pagan and 20th-century hermetic motifs for its theological structure and ritual practices. Wicca
Wicca
has no central authority. Its traditional core beliefs, principles and practices were originally outlined in the 1940s and 1950s by Gardner and Doreen Valiente, both in published books as well as in secret written and oral teachings passed along to their initiates. There are many variations on the core structure, and the religion grows and evolves over time
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Zuism
Zuism
Zuism
is a modern Pagan religious movement based on the Sumerian religion, deemed the "oldest religion, foundation of all major religions".[2] It was founded in Iceland
Iceland
at the start of the 2010s by Ólafur Helgi Þorgrímsson, and in 2013 the Z
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Armenian Neopaganism
Armenian Neopaganism, or Hetanism (Armenian: Հեթանոսութիւն Hetanosutiwn; a cognate word of "Heathenism"), is a Neopagan religion of reconstructionist kind, constituting an ethnic religion of the Armenians.[1] The followers of the movement call themselves Hetans (Armenian: հեթանոս Hetanos, which means "Heathen", thus "ethnic", each of them being loanwords from the Greek ἔθνος, ethnos)[2] or Arordi, meaning the Children of Ari.[2] The rebirth of Armenian paganism
Armenian paganism
has antecedents in the early 20th century, with the doctrine of
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Baltic Neopaganism
Baltic Neopaganism
Neopaganism
is a category of autochthonous religious movements which have revitalised within the Baltic people (primarily Lithuanians and Latvians).[1][2] These movements trace their origins back to the 19th century and they were suppressed under the Soviet Union; after its fall they have witnessed a blossoming alongside the national and cultural identity reawakening of the Baltic peoples, both in their homelands and among expatriate Baltic communities
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Dievturība
Dievturība
Dievturība
is a Neopagan religious movement which claims to be a modern revival of the folk religion of the Latvians before Christianization
Christianization
in the 13th century. Adherents call themselves Dievturi (singular: Dievturis), literally "Dievs' keepers", "people who live in harmony with Dievs". The Dievturi movement was founded in 1925 by Ernests Brastiņš. It was forcibly suppressed by Russian Communists in 1940, but later was revived. Approximately 650 persons are officially active members of Dievturi movement.[1]Contents1 History 2 Beliefs 3 Soul complex 4 See also 5 References 6 Resources 7 External linksHistory[edit] Dievturība
Dievturība
started in 1925 and (as a reconstructionistic movement) is primarily based on Latvian folklore, old folk songs (dainas) and mythology. By necessity, modern Dievturība
Dievturība
differs from the historical Latvian religion
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Druwi
Druwi
Druwi
(Old Prussian word meaning "Faith", cognate to tree;[1] Samogitian: Druwē) is a Baltic ethnic religious revival claiming Old Prussian origins,[2] and mostly present in Lithuania
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Romuva (religion)
Romuva is a modern reinstitution of the traditional ethnic religion of the Baltic peoples, reviving the ancient religious practices of the Lithuanians
Lithuanians
before their Christianization
Christianization
in 1387. Romuva claims to continue living Baltic pagan traditions which survived in folklore and customs.[1][2][3] Romuva is a polytheistic pagan faith which asserts the sanctity of nature and ancestor worship. Practising the Romuva faith is seen by many adherents as a form of cultural pride, along with celebrating traditional forms of art, retelling Baltic folklore, practising traditional holidays, playing traditional Baltic music, singing traditional dainas or hymns and songs as well as ecological activism and stewarding sacred places.[4] The community was organized and led by krivių krivaitis (high priest) Jonas Trinkūnas until his death in 2014
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Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
(also Celtic Reconstructionism or CR) is a polytheistic reconstructionist approach to Celtic neopaganism, emphasising historical accuracy over eclecticism such as is found in many forms of Neo-druidism. It is an effort to reconstruct and revive, in a modern Celtic cultural context, pre-Christian Celtic religions. Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism
originated in discussions among amateur scholars and Neopagans in the mid-1980s, and evolved into an independent tradition by the early 1990s
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Church Of All Worlds
The Church of All Worlds (CAW) is an American Neopagan religious group whose stated mission is to evolve a network of information, mythology, and experience that provides a context and stimulus for reawakening Gaia and reuniting her children through tribal community dedicated to responsible stewardship and evolving consciousness. It is based in Cotati, California. The key founder of CAW is Oberon Zell-Ravenheart, who serves the Church as "Primate", later along with his wife, Morning Glory Zell-Ravenheart (d. 2014), designated High Priestess. CAW was formed in 1962, evolving from a group of friends and lovers who were in part inspired by a fictional religion of the same name in the science fiction novel Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
(1961) by Robert A. Heinlein; the church's mythology includes science fiction to this day. CAW's members, called Waterkin, espouse Paganism, but the Church is not a belief-based religion
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Heathenry (new Religious Movement)
Heathenry, also termed Heathenism or Germanic Neopaganism, is a modern Pagan religion. Scholars of religious studies classify Heathenry as a new religious movement. Its practitioners model their faith on the pre-Christian belief systems adhered to by the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
of Iron Age and Early Medieval Europe. To reconstruct these past belief systems, Heathenry uses surviving historical, archaeological, and folkloric evidence as a basis, although approaches to this material vary considerably. Heathenry does not have a unified theology and is typically polytheistic, centering on a pantheon of deities from pre-Christian Germanic Europe. It adopts cosmological views from these religions, including an animistic view of the cosmos in which the natural world is imbued with spirits. The faith's deities and these spirits are honored in sacrificial rites known as blóts in which food and libations are offered to them
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