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Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
(FERC) is the United States federal agency that regulates the transmission and wholesale sale of electricity and natural gas in interstate commerce and regulates the transportation of oil by pipeline in interstate commerce. FERC also reviews proposals to build interstate natural gas pipelines, natural gas storage projects, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals, in addition to licensing non-federal hydropower projects. FERC is composed of five commissioners who are nominated by the U.S. President and confirmed by the U.S. Senate
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Dan Brouillette
Dan R. Brouillette (born August 18, 1962) is an American businessman who currently serves as the United States Deputy Secretary of Energy.[1] After being nominated for the position by President Donald Trump, Brouillette was confirmed by a 79–17 vote of the United States Senate on August 3, 2017.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Deputy Secretary of Energy 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Brouillette is originally from Paincourtville, Louisiana. He graduated from the University of Maryland.[3] Career[edit] Following his service in the United States Army, Brouillette served as Rep. Billy Tauzin's legislative director from 1989 to 1997.[3] From 1997 to 2000, he was Senior Vice President of R. Duffy Wall & Associates. Brouillette was Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs in the U.S. Department of Energy from 2001 to 2003 under President George W
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Cogeneration
Cogeneration
Cogeneration
or combined heat and power (CHP) is the use of a heat engine[1] or power station to generate electricity and useful heat at the same time. Trigeneration
Trigeneration
or combined cooling, heat and power refers to the simultaneous generation of electricity and useful heating and cooling from the combustion of a fuel or a solar heat collector
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Rick Perry
v t eJames Richard Perry (born March 4, 1950) is an American politician who is the 14th and current United States
United States
Secretary of Energy, serving in the Cabinet of Donald Trump. Prior to his cabinet position, Perry served as the 47th Governor of Texas
Governor of Texas
from December 2000 to January 2015. A Republican, he was elected Lieutenant Governor of Texas
Governor of Texas
in 1998 and assumed the governorship in December 2000 when then-Governor George W. Bush
George W. Bush
resigned to become President of the United States. Perry was the longest-serving Governor in Texas
Texas
history. Perry was elected three times to full gubernatorial terms and is the fourth Texas
Texas
Governor (after Allan Shivers, Price Daniel
Price Daniel
and John Connally) to serve three terms
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James V. Forrestal Building
The James V. Forrestal Building
James V. Forrestal Building
is a low-rise Brutalist office building located in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Originally known as Federal Office Building 5, and nicknamed the Little Pentagon, the Forrestal Building was constructed between 1965 and 1969 to accommodate United States
United States
armed forces personnel. It is named after James Forrestal, the first United States
United States
Secretary of Defense. It became the headquarters of the United States
United States
Department of Energy after that agency's creation in 1977. The 1,688,484-square-foot (156,865.3 m2) Forrestal Building is located at 1000 Independence Avenue SW. It consists of three structures: an East Building with eight floors above ground, the North Building with four floors above ground, and a West Building with two floors above ground
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Federal Register
The Federal Register
Federal Register
(FR or sometimes Fed. Reg.) is the official journal of the federal government of the United States that contains government agency rules, proposed rules, and public notices.[1] It is published daily, except on federal holidays. The final rules promulgated by a federal agency and published in the Federal Register are ultimately reorganized by topic or subject matter and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
(CFR), which is updated annually. The Federal Register
Federal Register
is compiled by the Office of the Federal Register (within the National Archives and Records Administration) and is printed by the Government Publishing Office
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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High-voltage Direct Current
A high-voltage, direct current (HVDC) electric power transmission system (also called a power superhighway or an electrical superhighway)[1][2][3][4] uses direct current for the bulk transmission of electrical power, in contrast with the more common alternating current (AC) systems.[5] For long-distance transmission, HVDC systems may be less expensive and suffer lower electrical losses. For underwater power cables, HVDC avoids the heavy currents required to charge and discharge the cable capacitance each cycle. For shorter distances, the higher cost of DC conversion equipment compared to an AC system may still be justified, due to other benefits of direct current links. HVDC uses voltages between 100 kV and 1,500 kV. HVDC allows power transmission between unsynchronized AC transmission systems
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Clean Water Action
Clean Water Action
Clean Water Action
is an American environmental advocacy group.[2] Created in 1972, the group focuses on canvassing and gaining support for political issues and candidates. It is a 501(c)(4) organization.Contents1 History 2 Political advocacy 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] The group was formed in 1972 by David Zwick as a grassroots and lobbying organization whose goal was to enact platforms delineated in Zwick's publication Water Wasteland
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United States Coast Guard
The United States
United States
Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces[6] and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission (with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters) and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy by the U.S. President at any time, or by the U.S. Congress during times of war
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Enron Corporation
Enron Energy Services
Enron Energy Services
(EES) Enron
Enron
XceleratorWebsite www.enron.com Enron
Enron
Corporation was an American energy, commodities, and services company based in Houston, Texas. It was founded in 1985 as a merger between Houston Natural Gas and InterNorth, both relatively small regional companies
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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United States Federal Courts
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Interstate Commerce
The Commerce
Commerce
Clause describes an enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3). The clause states that the United States Congress
United States Congress
shall have power "To regulate Commerce
Commerce
with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes." Courts and commentators have tended to discuss each of these three areas of commerce as a separate power granted to Congress.[1] It is common to see the individual components of the Commerce
Commerce
Clause referred to under specific terms: the Foreign Commerce Clause, the Interstate Commerce
Commerce
Clause,[2] and the Indian Commerce Clause. Dispute exists within the courts as to the range of powers granted to Congress by the Commerce
Commerce
Clause
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Sanctions (law)
Sanctions, in law and legal definition, are penalties or other means of enforcement used to provide incentives for obedience with the law, or with rules and regulations.[1] Criminal sanctions can take the form of serious punishment, such as corporal or capital punishment, incarceration, or severe fines. Within the civil law context, sanctions are usually monetary fines, levied against a party to a lawsuit or his/her attorney, for violating rules of procedure, or for abusing the judicial process. The most severe sanction in a civil lawsuit is the involuntary dismissal, with prejudice, of a complaining party's cause of action, or of the responding party's answer
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National Energy Act
The National Energy Act of 1978 (NEA78) was a legislative response by the U.S. Congress
U.S. Congress
to the 1973 energy crisis. It includes the following statutes: Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act
Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act
(PURPA) (Pub.L. 95–617) Energy Tax Act (Pub.L. 95–618) National Energy Conservation Policy Act
National Energy Conservation Policy Act
(NECPA) (Pub.L. 95–619) Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (Pub.L. 95–620) Natural Gas Policy Act (Pub.L. 95–621)The legislative initiative has been introduced by President Carter. The package was a major step in the legislation of the energy field, both the supply and the demand side
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.