HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Federal Communications Commission
The Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute (47 U.S.C. § 151 and 47 U.S.C. § 154) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The FCC
FCC
works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing itself.[4] The FCC
FCC
was formed by the Communications Act of 1934
Communications Act of 1934
to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission. The FCC took over wire communication regulation from the Interstate Commerce Commission. The FCC's mandated jurisdiction covers the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of the United States
[...More...]

"Federal Communications Commission" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

FCC (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
[...More...]

"FCC (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Organizational Culture
Organizational culture encompasses values and behaviours that "contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization".[1] According to Needle (2004),[2] organizational culture represents the collective values, beliefs and principles of organizational members and is a product of factors such as history, product, market, technology, strategy, type of employees, management style, and national culture; culture includes the organization's vision, values, norms, systems, symbols, language, assumptions, environment, location, beliefs and habits. Business
Business
executive Bernard L. Rosauer (2013) developed what he refers to as an actionable definition of organizational culture: " Organizational culture is an emergence – an extremely complex incalculable state that results from the combination of a few simple ingredients
[...More...]

"Organizational Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
[...More...]

"North America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Investment
In general, to invest is to allocate money (or sometimes another resource, such as time) in the expectation of some benefit in the future – for example, investment in durable goods, in real estate by the service industry, in factories for manufacturing, in product development, and in research and development. However, this article focuses specifically on investment in financial assets. In finance, the benefit from investment is called a return. The return may consist of capital gains or investment income, including dividends, interest, rental income etc., or a combination of the two. The projected economic return is the appropriately discounted value of the future returns
[...More...]

"Investment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Innovation
Innovation
Innovation
can be defined simply as a "new idea, device or method".[1] However, innovation is often also viewed as the application of better solutions that meet new requirements, unarticulated needs, or existing market needs.[2] This is accomplished through more-effective products, processes, services, technologies, or business models that are readily available to markets, governments and society. The term "innovation" can be defined as something original and more effective and, as a consequence, new, that "breaks into" the market or society.[3] It is related to, but not the same as, invention,[4] as innovation is more apt to involve the practical implementation of an invention (i.e. new/improved ability) to make a meaningful impact in the market or society,[5] and not all innovations require an invention. Innovation is often manifested via the engineering process, when the problem being solved is of a technical or scientific nature
[...More...]

"Innovation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diversity (politics)
In sociology and political studies, diversity is the degree of differences in identifying features among the members of a group, such as differences in racial or ethnic classifications, age, gender, religion, philosophy, physical abilities, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, gender identity, intelligence, mental health, physical health, genetic attributes, behavior or attractiveness. In measuring human diversity, a diversity index measures the probability that any two residents, chosen at random, would be of different ethnicities. If all residents are of the same ethnic group it's zero. The diversity index does not take into account the willingness of individuals to cooperate with those of other ethnicities
[...More...]

"Diversity (politics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Health
Public health
Public health
is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals."[1] Analyzing the health of a population and the threats is the basis for public health.[2] The "public" in question can be as small as a handful of people, an entire village or it can be as large as several continents, in the case of a pandemic. "Health" takes into account physical, mental and social well-being. It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health
Health
Organization.[3] Public health
Public health
is interdisciplinary. For example, epidemiology, biostatistics and health services are all relevant
[...More...]

"Public Health" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stakeholder (corporate)
In a corporation, as defined in its first usage in a 1983 internal memorandum at the Stanford Research Institute, a stakeholder is a member of the "groups without whose support the organization would cease to exist".[1] The theory was later developed and championed by R. Edward Freeman in the 1980s. Since then it has gained wide acceptance in business practice and in theorizing relating to strategic management, corporate governance, business purpose and corporate social responsibility (CSR). A corporate stakeholder can affect or be affected by the actions of a business as a whole. Whereas shareholders are often the party with the most direct and obvious interest at stake in business decisions, they are one of various subsets of stakeholders, as customers and employees also have stakes in the outcome
[...More...]

"Stakeholder (corporate)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
[...More...]

"President Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
[...More...]

"U.S. State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Senate
Majority (50)     Republican (50)Minority (49)     Democratic (47)      Independents (2) caucusing with the DemocratsVacant (1)     Vacant (1)Length of term6 yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 states.Last electionNovember 8, 2016 (34 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (33 seats)Meeting placeSenate chamber United States
United States
Capitol Washington
[...More...]

"United States Senate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Political Party
A political party is a group of people who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The political parties are well organized which agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests. While there is some international commonality in the way political parties are recognized, and in how they operate, there are often many differences, and some are significant. Many political parties have an ideological core, but some do not, and many represent ideologies very different from their ideology at the time the party was founded. Many countries, such as Germany and India, have several significant political parties, and some nations have one-party systems, such as China and Cuba. The United States is in practice a two-party system, but with many smaller parties also participating and a high degree of autonomy for individual candidates
[...More...]

"Political Party" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hearing (law)
In law, a hearing is a proceeding before a court or other decision-making body or officer, such as a government agency[1] or a Parliamentary committee.[2] A hearing is generally distinguished from a trial in that it is usually shorter and often less formal.[1] In the course of litigation, hearings are conducted as oral arguments in support of motions, whether to resolve the case without further trial on a motion to dismiss or for summary judgment, or to decide discrete issues of law, such as the admissibility of evidence, that will determine how the trial proceeds. Limited evidence and testimony may also be presented in hearings to supplement the legal arguments.[1] In the United States, one aspect of the "due process revolution" is that many administrative decisions that were once made much less formally must now be preceded by a hearing. An important step in this development was the Supreme Court
Court
decision in Goldberg v. Kelly, 397 U.S. 254 (1970)
[...More...]

"Hearing (law)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Disability Rights Movement
The disability rights movement is a global[1][2] social movement to secure equal opportunities and equal rights for all people with disabilities. It is made up of organizations of disability activists around the world working together with similar goals and demands, such as: accessibility and safety in architecture, transportation, and the physical environment; equal opportunities in independent living, employment equity, education, and housing; and freedom from discrimination, abuse, neglect, and from other rights violations.[3] Disability
Disability
activists are working to break institutional, physical, and societal barriers that prevent people with disabilitie
[...More...]

"Disability Rights Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frequency Allocation
Frequency allocation
Frequency allocation
(or spectrum allocation or spectrum management) is the allocation and regulation of the electromagnetic spectrum into radio frequency bands, which is normally done by governments in most countries.[1] Because radio propagation does not stop at national boundaries, governments have sought to harmonise the allocation of RF bands and their standardization.Contents1 ITU definition 2 Bodies 3 Example 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksITU definition[edit] The International Telecommunication Union
International Telecommunication Union
defines frequency allocation as being of "a given frequency band for the purpose of its use by one or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication services or the radio astronomy service under specified conditions".[2] Frequency allocation
Frequency allocation
is also a special term, used in national frequency administration
[...More...]

"Frequency Allocation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.