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Fatigue (physical)
Fatigue is a subjective feeling of tiredness which is distinct from weakness, and has a gradual onset. Unlike weakness, fatigue can be alleviated by periods of rest. Fatigue can have physical or mental causes. Physical fatigue is the transient inability of a muscle to maintain optimal physical performance, and is made more severe by intense physical exercise.[1][2][3] Mental fatigue is a transient decrease in maximal cognitive performance resulting from prolonged periods of cognitive activity. It can manifest as somnolence, lethargy, or directed attention fatigue.[4] Medically, fatigue is a non-specific symptom, which means that it has many possible causes and accompanies many different conditions. Fatigue is considered a symptom, rather than a sign, because it is a subjective feeling reported by the patient, rather than an objective one that can be observed by others
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Fatigue (other)
Fatigue may refer to: Fatigue (material), structural damage from repeated loadingSolder Fatigue Fatigue (medical), a state of physical and/or mental weakness.Central nervous system fatigue Chronic fatigue syndrome, a medical disorder Muscle fatigue, the decline in ability of a muscle to generate force F
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Stress (medicine)
Physiological
Physiological
or biological stress is an organism's response to a stressor such as an environmental condition. Stress is the body's method of reacting to a condition such as a challenge or physical and psychological barrier. Stimuli that alter an organism's environment are responded to by multiple systems in the body. The autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are two major systems that respond to stress. The sympathoadrenal medullary (SAM) axis may activate the fight-or-flight response through the sympathetic nervous system, which dedicates energy to more relevant bodily systems to acute adaptation to stress, while the parasympathetic nervous system returns the body to homeostasis. The second major physiological stress, the HPA axis
HPA axis
regulates the release of cortisol, which influences many bodily functions such as metabolic, psychological and immunological functions
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Action Potential
In physiology, an action potential occurs when the membrane potential of a specific axon location rapidly rises and falls:[1] this depolarisation then causes adjacent locations to similarly depolarise. Action potentials occur in several types of animal cells, called excitable cells, which include neurons, muscle cells, endocrine cells, and in some plant cells. In neurons, action potentials play a central role in cell-to-cell communication by providing for—or, with regard to saltatory conduction, assisting—the propagation of signals along the neuron's axon towards synaptic boutons situated at the ends of an axon; these signals can then connect with other neurons at synapses, or to motor cells or glands. In other types of cells, their main function is to activate intracellular processes. In muscle cells, for example, an action potential is the first step in the chain of events leading to contraction
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Neuromuscular Disease
Neuromuscular disease
Neuromuscular disease
is a very broad term that encompasses many diseases and ailments that impair the functioning of the muscles, either directly, being pathologies of the voluntary muscle, or indirectly, being pathologies of nerves or neuromuscular junctions.[2][5] Neuromuscular diseases are those that affect the muscles and/or their direct nervous system control, problems with central nervous control can cause either spasticity or some degree of paralysis (from both lower and upper motor neuron disorders), depending on the location and the nature of the problem. Some examples of central disorders include cerebrovascular accident, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease
and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease
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Electromyography
Electromyography
Electromyography
(EMG) is an electrodiagnostic medicine technique for evaluating and recording the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles.[1] EMG is performed using an instrument called an electromyograph to produce a record called an electromyogram. An electromyograph detects the electric potential generated by muscle cells[2] when these cells are electrically or neurologically activated
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Level Of Consciousness
An altered level of consciousness is any measure of arousal other than normal. Level of consciousness (LOC) is a measurement of a person's arousability and responsiveness to stimuli from the environment.[1] A mildly depressed level of consciousness or alertness may be classed as lethargy; someone in this state can be aroused with little difficulty.[1] People who are obtunded have a more depressed level of consciousness and cannot be fully aroused.[1][2] Those who are not able to be aroused from a sleep-like state are said to be stuporous.[1][2] Coma
Coma
is the inability to make any purposeful response.[1][2] Scales such as the Glasgow coma scale have been designed to measure the level of consciousness. An altered level of consciousness can result from a variety of factors, including alterations in the chemical environment of the brain (e.g
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Microsleep
A micro-sleep (MS) is a temporary episode of sleep or drowsiness which may last for a fraction of a second or up to 30 seconds where an individual fails to respond to some arbitrary sensory input and becomes unconscious.[1][2] MSs occur when an individual loses awareness and subsequently gains awareness after a brief lapse in consciousness, or when there are sudden shifts between states of wakefulness and sleep
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Perception
Perception
Perception
(from the Latin
Latin
perceptio) is the organization, identification, and interpretation of sensory information in order to represent and understand the presented information, or the environment.[1] All p
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Reticular Activating System
The reticular formation is a set of interconnected nuclei that are located throughout the brainstem. The reticular formation is not anatomically well defined because it includes neurons located in diverse parts of the brain. The neurons of the reticular formation make up a complex set of networks in the core of the brainstem that stretches from the upper part of the midbrain to the lower part of the medulla oblongata.[1] The reticular formation includes ascending pathways to the cortex in the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) and descending pathways to the spinal cord via the reticulospinal tracts of the descending reticular formation.[2][3][4][5] Neurons of the reticular formation, particularly those of the ascending reticular activating system, play a crucial role in maintaining behavioral arousal and consciousness. The functions of the reticular formation are modulatory and premotor
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Stimulation
Stimulation
Stimulation
is the encouragement of development or the cause of activity generally. For example, "The press provides stimulation of political discourse." An interesting or fun activity can be described as "stimulating", regardless of its physical effects on senses. Stimulate means to act as a stimulus to; stimulus means something that rouses the recipient to activity; stimuli is the plural of stimulus. A particular use of the term is physiological stimulation, which refers to sensory excitation, the action of various agents or forms of energy (stimuli) on receptors that generate impulses that travel through nerves to the brain (afferents). There are sensory receptors on or near the surface of the body, such as photoreceptors in the retina of the eye, hair cells in the cochlea of the ear, touch receptors in the skin and chemical receptors in the mouth and nasal cavity
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Labour (economics)
Labour economics
Labour economics
seeks to understand the functioning and dynamics of the markets for wage labour. Labour markets or job markets function through the interaction of workers and employers. Labour economics
Labour economics
looks at the suppliers of labour services (workers) and the demanders of labour services (employers), and attempts to understand the resulting pattern of wages, employment, and income. In economics, labour is a measure of the work done by human beings. It is conventionally contrasted with such other factors of production as land and capital
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Jet Lag
Jet lag is a physiological condition which results from alterations to the body's circadian rhythms resulting from rapid long-distance trans-meridian (east–west or west–east) travel. For example, someone travelling from New York to London
London
feels as if the time were five hours earlier than local time. Jet lag was previously classified as one of the circadian rhythm sleep disorders.[1] The condition of jet lag may last several days before the traveller is fully adjusted to the new time zone; a recovery period of one day per time zone crossed is a suggested guideline. Jet lag is especially an issue for airline pilots, crew, and frequent travellers. Airlines have regulations aimed at combating pilot fatigue caused by jet lag. The term "jet lag" is used because before the arrival of passenger jet aircraft, it was uncommon to travel far and fast enough to cause desynchronosis
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Lassitude (song)
"Lassitude" is a song by British-based drum and bass record producers Sigma and DJ Fresh. It is the fourth and final single released from Fresh's second studio album Kryptonite. It reached number 98 on the UK Singles Chart and number 11 on the UK Dance Chart.Contents1 Music video 2 Track listings 3 Chart performance 4 Release history 5 References 6 External linksMusic video[edit] The music video for the song was uploaded to YouTube
YouTube
on 4 October 2010.[1] Track listings[edit]Digital download[2]No. Title Length1. "Lassitude" (Radio Edit) 2:432. "Lassitude" (Club Mix) 5:373. "Cylon" ( DJ Fresh
DJ Fresh
vs
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Recreation
Recreation
Recreation
is an activity of leisure, leisure being discretionary time.[1] The "need to do something for recreation" is an essential element of human biology and psychology.[2] Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment, amusement, or pleasure and are considered to be "fun".Contents1 Etymology 2 Prerequisites to leisure 3 Play, recreation and work 4 Recreational activities 5 Organized recreation 6 Health and recreation 7
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Clinical Depression
Major depressive disorder
Major depressive disorder
(MDD), also known simply as depression, is a mental disorder characterized by at least two weeks of low mood that is present across most situations.[1] It is often accompanied by low self-esteem, loss of interest in normally enjoyable activities, low energy, and pain without a clear cause.[1] People may also occasionally have false beliefs or see or hear things that others cannot.[1] Some people have periods of depression separated by years in which they are normal while others nearly alwa
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