HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fasted
FASTING is a willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food , drink , or both, for a period of time. An ABSOLUTE FAST or DRY FASTING is normally defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period, usually a period of 24 hours, or a number of days. Water fasting allows drinking water but nothing else. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only particular foods or substances. A fast may also be intermittent in nature . Fasting practices may preclude intercourse and other activities as well as food. In a physiological context, fasting may refer to the metabolic status of a person who has not eaten overnight, or to the metabolic state achieved after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting, and some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state
[...More...]

"Fasted" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Non-violent Resistance
NONVIOLENT RESISTANCE (NVR or NONVIOLENT ACTION) is the practice of achieving goals such as social change through symbolic protests , civil disobedience , economic or political noncooperation, satyagraha , or other methods, while being nonviolent . This type of action highlights the desires of an individual or group that feels that something needs to change to improve the current condition of the resisting person or group. It is largely but wrongly taken as synonymous with civil resistance . Each of these terms—nonviolent resistance and civil resistance—has its distinct merits and also quite different connotations and commitments
[...More...]

"Non-violent Resistance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hunger Strike
A HUNGER STRIKE is a method of non-violent resistance or pressure in which participants fast as an act of political protest , or to provoke feelings of guilt in others, usually with the objective to achieve a specific goal, such as a policy change. Most hunger strikers will take liquids but not solid food. In cases where an entity (usually the state ) has or is able to obtain custody of the hunger striker (such as a prisoner ), the hunger strike is often terminated by the custodial entity through the use of force-feeding
[...More...]

"Hunger Strike" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Vision Famine Events
FAMINE EVENTS are localized events of voluntary fasting for 30 or 40 hours depending on the region to raise money and awareness for world hunger . These events are usually coordinated by one of various World Vision organizations and are done by youth in church organizations. They have spread internationally, notably the international 30 HOUR FAMINE, also the regional 40 HOUR FAMINE in Australia
Australia
and New Zealand and the 24 HOUR FAMINE in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. The 30 Hour Famine is the most popular amongst all, spreading across 21 countries
[...More...]

"World Vision Famine Events" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Vision
WORLD VISION INTERNATIONAL is an Evangelical Christian humanitarian aid , development , and advocacy organization. It prefers to present itself as interdenominational and employs also staff from non-evangelical Christian denominations It was founded in 1950 by Robert Pierce
Robert Pierce
as a service organization to meet the emergency needs of missionaries. In 1975 development work was added to World Vision's objectives. It is active in more than 90 countries with a total revenue including grants, product and foreign donations of $2.79 billion (2011). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Organizational structure * 3 Religion * 4 Activities and philosophy * 5 Child sponsorship * 5.1 Accusations of misrepresentation * 6 Other controversies * 6.1 Local corruption * 6.2 Relationship with U.S
[...More...]

"World Vision" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

British India
PROVINCES OF INDIA, earlier PRESIDENCIES OF BRITISH INDIA and still earlier, PRESIDENCY TOWNS, were the administrative divisions of British governance in the subcontinent. Collectively, they were called BRITISH INDIA. In one form or other they existed between 1612 and 1947, conventionally divided into three historical periods. * During 1612–1757, the East India Company set up "factories" (trading posts) in several locations, mostly in coastal India, with the consent of the Mughal emperors or local rulers. Its rivals were the merchant trading companies of The Netherlands and France
[...More...]

"British India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Protest
A PROTEST (also called a REMONSTRANCE, REMONSTRATION or DEMONSTRATION) is an expression of bearing witness on behalf of an express cause by words or actions with regard to particular events, policies or situations. Protests can take many different forms, from individual statements to mass demonstrations . Protesters may organize a protest as a way of publicly making their opinions heard in an attempt to influence public opinion or government policy, or they may undertake direct action in an attempt to directly enact desired changes themselves. Where protests are part of a systematic and peaceful campaign to achieve a particular objective, and involve the use of pressure as well as persuasion, they go beyond mere protest and may be better described as cases of civil resistance or nonviolent resistance
[...More...]

"Protest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Refeeding Syndrome
REFEEDING SYNDROME is a syndrome consisting of metabolic disturbances that occur as a result of reinstitution of nutrition to patients who are starved , severely malnourished or metabolically stressed due to severe illness. When too much food and/or liquid nutrition supplement is consumed during the initial four to seven days of refeeding this triggers synthesis of glycogen, fat and protein in cells, to the detriment of serum concentrations of potassium, magnesium and phosphorus. Cardiac, pulmonary and neurological symptoms can be signs of refeeding syndrome. The low serum minerals, if severe enough, can be fatal. CONTENTS * 1 Syndrome * 2 History * 3 Treatment * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Bibliography SYNDROMEAny individual who has had negligible nutrient intake for many consecutive days and/or is metabolically stressed from a critical illness or major surgery is at risk of refeeding syndrome
[...More...]

"Refeeding Syndrome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

White Blood Cell
WHITE BLOOD CELLS (WBCS), also called LEUKOCYTES or LEUCOCYTES, are the cells of the immune system that are involved in protecting the body against both infectious disease and foreign invaders. All white blood cells are produced and derived from multipotent cells in the bone marrow known as hematopoietic stem cells . Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system . All white blood cells have nuclei , which distinguishes them from the other blood cells , the anucleated red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets . Types of white blood cells can be classified in standard ways. Two pairs of broadest categories classify them either by structure (granulocytes or agranulocytes ) or by cell division lineage (myeloid cells or lymphoid cells). These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils , eosinophils , basophils , lymphocytes , and monocytes
[...More...]

"White Blood Cell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Weight Loss
WEIGHT LOSS, in the context of medicine, health, or physical fitness , refers to a reduction of the total body mass , due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon, and other connective tissue. Weight loss
Weight loss
can either occur unintentionally due to malnourishment or an underlying disease or arise from a conscious effort to improve an actual or perceived overweight or obese state. "Unexplained" weight loss that is not caused by reduction in calorific intake or exercise is called cachexia and may be a symptom of a serious medical condition . Intentional weight loss is commonly referred to as SLIMMING
[...More...]

"Weight Loss" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

DPP-4
1J2E, 1N1M, 1NU6, 1NU8, 1PFQ, 1R9M, 1R9N, 1RWQ, 1TK3, 1TKR, 1U8E, 1W1I, 1WCY, 1X70, 2AJL, 2BGN, 2BGR, 2BUB, 2FJP, 2G5P, 2G5T, 2G63, 2HHA, 2I03, 2I78, 2IIT, 2IIV, 2JID, 2OAG, 2OGZ, 2OLE, 2ONC, 2OPH, 2OQI, 2OQV, 2P8S, 2QJR, 2QKY, 2QOE, 2QT9, 2QTB, 2RGU, 2RIP, 3BJM, 3C43, 3C45, 3CCB, 3CCC, 3D4L, 3EIO, 3F8S, 3G0B, 3G0C, 3G0D, 3G0G, 3H0C, 3HAB, 3HAC, 3KWF, 3KWJ, 3NOX, 3O95, 3O9V, 3OC0, 3OPM, 3Q0T, 3Q8W, 3QBJ, 3SWW, 3SX4, 3VJK, 3VJL, 3VJM, 3W2T, 4A5S, 4DSA, 4DSZ, 4DTC, 4G1F, 4JH0, 4KR0, 4L72, 4LKO, 4J3J, 4N8D, 4N8E, 4PNZ, 4PV7, 4QZV, 3WQH, 5KBY, 5ISM, 5I7U IDENTIFIERS ALIASES DPP4, ADABP, ADCP2, CD26, DPPIV, TP103, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 EXTERNAL IDS OMIM: 102720 MGI: 94919 HomoloGene: 3279 GeneCards: DPP4 GENE LOCATION (HUMAN) CHR. Chromosome
Chromosome
2 (human) BAND 2q24.2 START 161,992,241 bp END 162,074,542 bp GENE LOCATION (MOUSE) CHR
[...More...]

"DPP-4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Osteoporosis
OSTEOPOROSIS is a disease where increased bone weakness increases the risk of a broken bone . It is the most common reason for a broken bone among the elderly . Bones that commonly break include the vertebrae in the spine , the bones of the forearm , and the hip . Until a broken bone occurs there are typically no symptoms. Bones may weaken to such a degree that a break may occur with minor stress or spontaneously. Chronic pain and a decreased ability to carry out normal activities may occur following a broken bone. Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis
may be due to lower than normal bone mass and greater than normal bone loss. Bone loss increases after menopause due to lower levels of estrogen . Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis
may also occur due to a number of diseases or treatments including alcoholism , anorexia , hyperthyroidism , kidney disease , and surgical removal of the ovaries
[...More...]

"Osteoporosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jatin Das
INFLUENCE * Indian Nationalism (Militant nationalism ) * Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay
Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay
* Swami Vivekananda
Swami Vivekananda
* Sister Nivedita
Sister Nivedita
* Aurobindo Ghosh * Shakta philosophy * Indian National Congress
Indian National Congress
* Bipin Chandra Pal
Bipin Chandra Pal
* 1905 Partition of Bengal
Bengal
* Bande Mataram * Jugantar
Jugantar
* M. C. Samadhyayi ANUSHILAN SAMITI * History * Dhaka Anushilan Samiti
Anushilan Samiti
* Jugantar
Jugantar
* Aurobindo * Raja Subodh Mallik * Pramathanath Mitra
Pramathanath Mitra
* Sarala Devi * C.R
[...More...]

"Jatin Das" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bhagat Singh
BHAGAT SINGH (Punjabi pronunciation: ( listen ) 1907 – 23 March 1931) was a charismatic Indian socialist revolutionary whose two acts of dramatic violence against the British in India and execution at age 23 made him a folk hero of the Indian independence movement
Indian independence movement
. In December 1928, Bhagat Singh
Bhagat Singh
and an associate, Shivaram Rajguru
Shivaram Rajguru
, fatally shot a 21-year-old British police officer, John Saunders, in Lahore
Lahore
, British India
British India
, mistaking Saunders, who was still on probation, for the British police superintendent, James Scott, whom they had intended to assassinate
[...More...]

"Bhagat Singh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bahá'í Faith
The BAHá\'í FAITH (Persian : بهائی‎‎ Bahā'i) is a religion teaching the essential worth of all religions, and the unity and equality of all people. Established by Bahá\'u\'lláh in 1863, it initially grew in the Middle East
Middle East
and now has between 5 and 7 million adherents, known as BAHá\'íS, spread out into most of the world's countries and territories, with the highest concentration in Iran. The religion was born in Iran
Iran
, where it has faced ongoing persecution since its inception. It grew from the mid-19th century Bábí religion , whose founder taught that God
God
would soon send a prophet in the manner of Jesus
Jesus
or