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Family 1
Family 1
Family 1
is a group of Greek Gospel
Gospel
manuscripts, varying in date from the 12th to the 15th century. The group takes its name from the minuscule codex 1, now in the Basel University Library. "Family 1" is also known as "the Lake Group", symbolized as f1. Hermann von Soden calls the group Ih. Aland lists it as Category III in the Gospels
Gospels
and Category V elsewhere.[1] Family 1
Family 1
was discovered in 1902, when Kirsopp Lake
Kirsopp Lake
(1872–1946) published Codex 1 of the Gospels
Gospels
and its Allies (118, 131, 209), and established the existence of a new textual family
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Uncial 0281
Uncial 0281 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 7th or 8th century.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Text 3 Location 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains a small parts of the Gospel of Matthew 6-27, on 47 parchment leaves (20 cm by 17 cm). The text is written in one column per page, 20 lines per page, in uncial letters. It is a palimpsest, the upper text contains part of the Old Testament.[1] Currently it is dated by the INTF to the 7th or 8th century.[1][2] Text[edit] The Greek text of the codex is a representative of the late Alexandrian text-type. It agrees 18 times with Codex Sinaiticus and 12 times with Codex Vaticanus.[3] Location[edit] It is one of the manuscripts discovered in Saint Catherine's Monastery, Sinai in May 1975, during restoration work.[4] Currently the codex is housed at the monastery (N.E
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Matthew 1
Matthew 1
Matthew 1
is the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the New Testament. It contains two distinct sections. The first lists the genealogy of Jesus
Jesus
from Abraham
Abraham
to his legal father Joseph, his mother's husband
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Alexandrian Text-type
The Alexandrian text-type
Alexandrian text-type
(also called Neutral or Egyptian), associated with Alexandria, is one of several text-types used in New Testament textual criticism to describe and group the textual characters of biblical manuscripts. The Alexandrian text-type
Alexandrian text-type
is the form of the Greek New Testament
New Testament
that predominates in the earliest surviving documents, as well as the text-type used in Egyptian Coptic manuscripts
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Matthew 2
Matthew 2
Matthew 2
is the second chapter of the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the New Testament
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Codex Dublinensis
Codex Dublinensis designated by Z or 035 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 26 (von Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the Gospels, dated palaeographically to the 6th century. The manuscript is lacunose.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Contents 3 Text 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains a portions of the text of Gospel of Matthew, on 32 parchment leaves (27 cm by 20 cm), with numerous lacunae. The text is written in one column per page, 21 lines per column, in 27 letters in line.[1] The uncial letters are large, broad, attractive, and very precise.[2] The letters are larger than in codices Alexandrinus and Vaticanus, but smaller than in Codex Petropolitanus Purpureus.[3] It is a palimpsest
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Burnett Hillman Streeter
Burnett Hillman Streeter (17 November 1874 – 10 September 1937) was a British biblical scholar and textual critic.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] Streeter was born in London and educated at The Queen's College, Oxford. He was ordained in 1899 and was a member of the Archbishop’s Commission on Doctrine in the Church of England (from 1922 to 1937). In 1910, Streeter formed a group of Oxford dons known as The Group, which met weekly to discuss theological topics
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Eusebius Of Caesarea
Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea (/juːˈsiːbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius
Eusebius
Pamphili (from the Greek: Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima
Caesarea Maritima
about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon
Biblical canon
and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time.[1] He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text
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Scholion
Scholia (singular scholium or scholion, from Ancient Greek: σχόλιον, "comment, interpretation") are grammatical, critical, or explanatory comments, either original or extracted from pre-existing commentaries, which are inserted on the margin of the manuscript of an ancient author, as glosses. One who writes scholia is a scholiast. The earliest attested use of the word dates to the 1st century BC.[1]Contents1 History 2 Important sets of scholia 3 List of ancient commentaries 4 Other uses 5 References5.1 Bibliography6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient scholia are important sources of information about many aspects of the ancient world, especially ancient literary history. The earliest scholia, usually anonymous, date to the 5th or 4th century BC (such as the "a" scholia on the Iliad)
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Gospel Of John
The Gospel
Gospel
According to John (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Ἰωάννην εὐαγγέλιον, translit. Tò katà Iōánnēn euangélion; also called the Gospel
Gospel
of John, the Fourth Gospel, or simply John) is one of the four canonical gospels in the New Testament. It traditionally appears fourth, after the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Although the Gospel
Gospel
of John is anonymous,[1] Christian tradition historically has attributed it to John the Apostle, son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and one of Jesus' Twelve Apostles. The gospel is so closely related in style and content to the three surviving Johannine epistles
Johannine epistles
that commentators treat the four books,[2] along with the Book
Book
of Revelation, as a single corpus of Johannine literature, albeit not necessarily written by the same author.[Notes 1] C. K
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Minuscule 372
Minuscule 372 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 600 (Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 16th century.[2] It is almost without a marginal equipment.Contents1 Description 2 Text 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains the text of the four Gospels on 199 parchment leaves (24.2 cm by 16.7 cm) with one big lacunae (John 3:1-21:25)
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Minuscule 1582
Minuscule 1582 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering). It is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the four Gospels. It is dated 948.[1] According to the Claremont Profile Method it represents the Alexandrian text-type as a core member. See also[edit]List of New Testament minuscules Textual criticism Biblical manuscriptReferences[edit]^ Bruce M. Metzger, "Manuscripts of the Greek Bible: An Introduction to Greek Paleography", Oxford University Press, New York - Oxford, 1991, p. 91.This article about a manuscript is a stub
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Cardinal Bessarion
Basilios (or Basilius) Bessarion (Greek: Βασίλειος Βησσαρίων; 2 January 1403 – 18 November 1472), a Roman Catholic Cardinal Bishop
Cardinal Bishop
and the titular Latin Patriarch of Constantinople, was one of the illustrious Greek scholars who contributed to the great revival of letters in the 15th century. He was educated by Gemistus Pletho
Gemistus Pletho
in Neoplatonic philosophy
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Minuscule 579
Minuscule 579
Minuscule 579
(in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 376 (von Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 13th century.[2] Formerly it was labelled as 80e (Scrivener). The manuscript is lacunose.Contents1 Description 2 Text 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] The codex contains the complete text of the four Gospels with some lacunae (Mark 3:28-4:8; John 20:15-21:25) on 152 leaves (size 23.3 cm by 16.2 cm). The text is written in one column per page, 28-39 lines per page.[2] Words are written continuously without any separation, accents, and breathings. It contains lists of the κεφαλαια (tables of contents) before each Gospel, numbers of the κεφαλαια (chapters) at the margin, and the τιτλοι (titles) at the top of the pages
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
New Testamen

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