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Falcon 1
The Falcon 1
Falcon 1
was an expendable launch system privately developed and manufactured by SpaceX
SpaceX
during 2006–2009.[3] On 28 September 2008, Falcon 1
Falcon 1
became the first privately-developed liquid-fuel launch vehicle to go into orbit around the Earth.[4]:203 The two-stage-to-orbit rocket used LOX/ RP-1
RP-1
for both stages, the first powered by a single Merlin engine and the second powered by a single Kestrel engine. It was designed by SpaceX
SpaceX
from the ground up. The vehicle was launched a total of five times. Falcon 1
Falcon 1
achieved orbit on its fourth attempt, in September 2008 with a mass simulator as a payload
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2195 Aluminum Alloy
2195 aluminium alloy is an alloy in the wrought aluminium-copper family (2000 or 2xxx series). It is one of the most complex grades in the 2000 series, with at least 91.9% aluminium by weight. Like most other aluminium-copper alloys, 2195 is a high-strength alloy, with bad workability, and poor corrosion resistance. Being highly alloyed, it tends to fall on the higher strength and lower corrosion resistance side. As a wrought alloy, it is not used in casting
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Private Spaceflight
Private spaceflight
Private spaceflight
is flight beyond the Kármán line
Kármán line
(above the nominal edge of space at 100 km (62 mi) Earth altitude)—or the development of new spaceflight technology—that is conducted and paid for by an entity other than a government agency. In the early decades of the Space Age, the government space agencies of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and United States
United States
pioneered space technology in collaboration with affiliated design bureaus in the USSR and private companies in the US, entirely funding both the development of new spaceflight technologies and the operational costs of spaceflight
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2014 Aluminum Alloy
2014 aluminium alloy is an aluminium-based alloy often used in the aerospace industry.[1] It is easily machined in certain tempers, and among the strongest available aluminium alloys, as well as having high hardness. However, it is difficult to weld, as it is subject to cracking.[2] 2014 is the second most popular of the 2000-series aluminum alloys, after 2024 aluminum alloy. It is commonly extruded and forged. The corrosion resistance of this alloy is particularly poor. To combat this, it is often clad with pure aluminum
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Cryogenic
In physics, cryogenics is the production and behaviour of materials at very low temperatures. It is not well-defined at what point on the temperature scale refrigeration ends and cryogenics begins, but scientists[1] assume a gas to be cryogenic if it can be liquefied at or below −150 °C (123.15 K; −238.00 °F). The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has chosen to consider the field of cryogenics as that involving temperatures below −180 °C (93.15 K; −292.00 °F)
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Drogue Chute
A drogue parachute is a parachute designed to be deployed from a rapidly moving object in order to slow the object, to provide control and stability, or as a pilot parachute to deploy a larger parachute. It was invented in Russia by Gleb Kotelnikov in 1912.Contents1 Design and operational characteristics 2 History 3 Use3.1 Parachuting 3.2 Deceleration 3.3 Stability4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDesign and operational characteristics[edit] A drogue parachute is more elongated and has a far smaller area than a conventional parachute and therefore provides less drag
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Alloy
An alloy is a combination of metals or of a metal and another element. Alloys are defined by a metallic bonding character.[1] An alloy may be a solid solution of metal elements (a single phase) or a mixture of metallic phases (two or more solutions). Intermetallic compounds are alloys with a defined stoichiometry and crystal structure. Zintl phases are also sometimes considered alloys depending on bond types (see also: Van Arkel-Ketelaar triangle
Van Arkel-Ketelaar triangle
for information on classifying bonding in binary compounds). Alloys are used in a wide variety of applications. In some cases, a combination of metals may reduce the overall cost of the material while preserving important properties. In other cases, the combination of metals imparts synergistic properties to the constituent metal elements such as corrosion resistance or mechanical strength
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Aluminum
Aluminium
Aluminium
or aluminum is a chemical element with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, nonmagnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. By mass, aluminium makes up about 8% of the Earth's crust; it is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon and the most abundant metal in the crust, though it is less common in the mantle below. The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite. Aluminium
Aluminium
metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.[5] Aluminium
Aluminium
is remarkable for its low density and its ability to resist corrosion through the phenomenon of passivation
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Minimum Viable Product
A minimum viable product (MVP) is a product with just enough features to satisfy early customers, and to provide feedback for future product development.[1][2] Gathering insights from an MVP is often less expensive than developing a product with more features, which increase costs and risk if the product fails, for example, due to incorrect assumptions. The term was coined and defined by Frank Robinson about 2001,[3] and popularized by Steve Blank, and Eric Ries.[4][5][6][7] It may also involve carrying out market analysis beforehand.Contents1 Description1.1 Purposes 1.2 Testing 1.3 Notable quotes 1.4 Marketing 1.5 Business Model Canvas2 Emerging applications2.1 Minimum viable brand (MVB) 2.2 Minimum viable co-founder 2.3 Minimum viable team3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] A minimum viable product has just those core features sufficient to deploy the product, and no more
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Cassiope
Cassiope
Cassiope
is a genus of 9-12 small shrubby species in the family Ericaceae. They are native to the Arctic and north temperate montane regions. The genus is named after Cassiopeia of Greek mythology. Common names, shared with several other similar related genera, include heather and heath. They have scale-like leaves lying against the stems, and produce solitary bell-shaped flowers in late spring. Though hardy, flowers can be damaged by late frosts. They are cultivated in gardens, suitable sites being rock gardens, peat banks or glades in woodland areas.[1] The hybrid cultivars 'Randle Cook'[2] and ‘Muirhead’[3] have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit
Award of Garden Merit
(confirmed 2017).[4] References[edit]^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136
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TacSat-2
TacSat-2
TacSat-2
(also known as JWS-D1 or RoadRunner)[1] was an experimental satellite built by the USAF's Air Force Research Laboratory
Air Force Research Laboratory
with an operational life expected to be not more than one year as part of the 'Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration' program.Contents1 Purpose 2 Launch 3 Systems3.1 Platform 3.2 Camera / Telescope 3.3 Signals Intelligence4 Orbit 5 Developers 6 See also 7 ReferencesPurpose[edit] The TacSat series of experimental spacecraft are designed to allow military commanders on a battlefield to request and obtain imagery and other data from a satellite as it passes overhead
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DARPA
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military. Originally known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), the agency was created in February 1958 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
in 1957. Since its inception, the agency's mission is ensuring that the United States avoids further technological surprise.[3] By collaborating with academic, industry, and government partners, DARPA
DARPA
formulates and executes research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, often beyond immediate U.S
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United States Department Of Defense
742,000 (civilian) 1,300,000 (active duty military) 826,000 (National Guard and reserve): 2.87 million total[1] (2016)Annual budget US$530.1 billion (2010)[2] US$549.1 billion (2011)[3] US$553.0 billion (est. 2012) US$496.1 billion (2015)[4] US$534.3 billion (base FY2016)[4]Department executivesJim Mattis, Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan, Deputy SecretaryChild agenciesU.S. Department of the Army U.S. Department of the Navy U.S. Department of the Air ForceWebsite www.defense.govThe Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of DefenseThe Department of Defense (DoD,[5] USDOD, or DOD) is an executive branch department of the federal government of the United States charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government concerned directly with national security and the United States Armed Forces
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Liquid Oxygen
Liquid oxygen—abbreviated LOx, LOX or Lox in the aerospace, submarine and gas industries—is one of the physical forms of elemental oxygen.Contents1 Physical properties 2 Uses2.1 In rocket propellant3 History 4 See also 5 ReferencesPhysical properties[edit] Liquid oxygen
Liquid oxygen
has a pale blue color and is strongly paramagnetic: it can be suspended between the poles of a powerful horseshoe magnet.[1]
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Rocket
A rocket (from Italian rocchetto "bobbin")[nb 1][1] is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine. Rocket engine
Rocket engine
exhaust is formed entirely from propellant carried within the rocket before use.[2] Rocket
Rocket
engines work by action and reaction and push rockets forward simply by expelling their exhaust in the opposite direction at high speed, and can therefore work in the vacuum of space. In fact, rockets work more efficiently in space than in an atmosphere. Multistage rockets are capable of attaining escape velocity from Earth and therefore can achieve unlimited maximum altitude. Compared with airbreathing engines, rockets are lightweight and powerful and capable of generating large accelerations
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Orbit
In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object,[1] such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet. Normally, orbit refers to a regularly repeating trajectory, although it may also refer to a non-repeating trajectory. To a close approximation, planets and satellites follow elliptic orbits, with the central mass being orbited at a focal point of the ellipse,[2] as described by Kepler's laws of planetary motion. Current understanding of the mechanics of orbital motion is based on Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which accounts for gravity as due to curvature of spacetime, with orbits following geodesics
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