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Fairey Barracuda
The Fairey Barracuda
Fairey Barracuda
was a British carrier-borne torpedo and dive bomber used during the Second World War, the first of its type used by the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm
Fleet Air Arm
to be fabricated entirely from metal. It was introduced as a replacement for the Fairey Swordfish
Fairey Swordfish
and Fairey Albacore biplanes
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Royal Air Force
The Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force. Formed towards the end of the First World War
First World War
on 1 April 1918,[2] it is the oldest independent air force in the world.[3] Following victory over the Central Powers
Central Powers
in 1918 the RAF emerged as, at the time, the largest air force in the world.[4] Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history
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Boscombe Down
MoD Boscombe Down
MoD Boscombe Down
(ICAO: EGDM) is the home of a military aircraft testing site, located near the town of Amesbury
Amesbury
in Wiltshire, England. The site is currently run, managed and operated by QinetiQ;[1] the private defence company created as part of the breakup of the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) in 2001 by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD)
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Aerial Torpedo
An aerial torpedo, airborne torpedo or air-dropped torpedo[1] is a naval weapon, a torpedo, that an aircraft—fixed-wing aircraft or helicopter—drops in the water, after which the weapon propels itself to the target.[2] First used in World War I, air-dropped torpedoes were used extensively in World War II, and remain in limited use. Aerial torpedoes are generally smaller and lighter than submarine- and surface-launched torpedoes. Historically, the term "aerial torpedo" meant flying bombs and pilotless drone aircraft used as weapons, which would today be called cruise missiles.[3][4] Today, the term refers primarily to water-borne torpedoes launched from the air.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 First torpedo aircraft 1.3 First World War 1.4 Interwar years 1.5 World War II 1.6 Korean War 1.7 Modern weapons2 Design 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit]In 1915, Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske
Bradley A

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X Engine
An X engine
X engine
is a piston engine comprising twinned V-block engines horizontally opposed to each other. Thus, the cylinders are arranged in four banks, driving a common crankshaft. Viewed head-on, this would appear as an X. X engines were often coupled engines derived from existing powerplants. This configuration is extremely uncommon, primarily due its weight and complexity as compared to a radial engine. It was more compact (per number of cylinders) than a V-engine, however. Shorter crankshafts relative to an inline or V design also appealed to early 20th-century engineers like Henry Ford, given the less developed metallurgical technology of the time.[2] Most examples of X engines are from the World War II
World War II
era, and were designed for large military aircraft. The majority of these are X-24s based on existing V-12s
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Sleeve Valve
The sleeve valve is a type of valve mechanism for piston engines, distinct from the usual poppet valve. Sleeve valve
Sleeve valve
engines saw use in a number of pre- World War II
World War II
luxury cars and in the United States in the Willys-Knight
Willys-Knight
car and light truck. They subsequently fell from use due to advances in poppet-valve technology, including sodium cooling, and the Knight system double sleeve engine's tendency to burn a lot of lubricating oil or to seize due to lack of it
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V Engine
A V engine, or Vee engine is a common configuration for an internal combustion engine. The cylinders and pistons are aligned, in two separate planes or 'banks', so that they appear to be in a "V" when viewed along the axis of the crankshaft. The Vee configuration generally reduces the overall engine length, height and weight compared with an equivalent inline configuration.Contents1 History 2 Characteristics 3 Inverted engines 4 Specific configurations 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first V-type engine, a 2-cylinder vee twin, was built in 1889 by Daimler, to a design by Wilhelm Maybach. By 1903 V8 engines were being produced for motor boat racing by the Société Antoinette to designs by Léon Levavasseur, building on experience gained with in-line four-cylinder engines. In 1904, the Putney Motor Works completed a new V12, 150bhp 18.4 litre engine – the first V12 engine
V12 engine
produced for any purpose
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De Havilland
De Havilland
De Havilland
Aircraft Company Limited /dəˈhævɪlənd/ was a British aviation manufacturer established in late 1920 by Geoffrey de Havilland at Stag Lane Aerodrome
Stag Lane Aerodrome
Edgware
Edgware
on the outskirts of north London. Operations were later moved to Hatfield in Hertfordshire. Known for its innovation, de Havilland were responsible for a number of important aircraft, including the Moth biplane which revolutionised general aviation in the 1920s, the 1930s Fox Moth, the first commercial transport able to operate without government subsidy,[citation needed] the wooden World War II Mosquito light bomber, and the passenger jet service pioneering Comet. The De Havilland
De Havilland
company became a member of the Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
group in 1960, but lost its separate identity in 1963
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Stockport
Stockport
Stockport
/ˈstɒkpɔːrt/ is a large town in Greater Manchester, England, 7 miles (11 km) south-east of Manchester
Manchester
city centre, where the River Goyt
River Goyt
and Tame merge to create the River Mersey. The town is the largest settlement in the metropolitan borough of the same name. Historically, most of the town was in Cheshire, but the area to the north of the Mersey was in Lancashire. Stockport
Stockport
in the 16th century was a small town entirely on the south bank of the Mersey, and known for the cultivation of hemp and manufacture of rope. In the 18th century the town had one of the first mechanised silk factories in the British Isles. However, Stockport's predominant industries of the 19th century were the cotton and allied industries
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Blackburn Aircraft Ltd
Blackburn Aircraft
Aircraft
Limited was a British aircraft manufacturer that concentrated mainly on naval and maritime aircraft during the first part of the 20th century.Contents1 History1.1 Locations2 Aircraft 3 Piston engines 4 Gas turbine engines (with Turbomeca) 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Blackburn Aircraft
Aircraft
was founded by Robert Blackburn, who built his first aircraft in Leeds
Leeds
in 1908 with the company's Olympia Works at Roundhay
Roundhay
opening in 1914.[1][2] The Blackburn Aeroplane & Motor Company was created in 1914,[3] established in a new factory built at Brough, East Riding of Yorkshire in 1916,[4] where Robert's brother Norman Blackburn was later managing director
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Yagi Antenna
A Yagi–Uda antenna, commonly known as a Yagi antenna, is a directional antenna consisting of multiple parallel elements in a line,[1] usually half-wave dipoles made of metal rods.[2] Yagi–Uda antennas consist of a single driven element connected to the transmitter or receiver with a transmission line, and additional "parasitic elements" which are not connected to the transmitter or receiver: a so-called reflector and one or more directors.[2][3][4] It was invented in 1926 by Shintaro Uda
Shintaro Uda
of Tohoku Imperial University, Japan,[5] and (with a lesser role played by his colleague) Hidetsugu Yagi
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Aviator
An aircraft pilot or aviator is a person who controls the flight of an aircraft by operating its directional flight controls. Some other aircrew members, such as navigators or flight engineers, are also considered aviators, because they are involved in operating the aircraft's navigation and engine systems. Other aircrew members such as flight attendants, mechanics and ground crew, are not classified as aviators. In recognition of the pilots' qualifications and responsibilities, most militaries and many airlines worldwide award aviator badges to their pilots, and this includes naval aviators.Contents1 History 2 Civilian2.1 Airline2.1.1 Automation2.2 Africa
Africa
and Asia 2.3 Canada 2.4 United States3 Military 4 Unmanned aerial vehicles 5 Space 6 Pilot certifications 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Hot air balloon
Hot air balloon
pilot and passenger in basketThis section needs expansion
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Hydraulic
Hydraulics
Hydraulics
(from Greek: Υδραυλική) is a technology and applied science using engineering, chemistry, and other sciences involving the mechanical properties and use of liquids. At a very basic level, hydraulics is the liquid counterpart of pneumatics, which concerns gases. Fluid mechanics
Fluid mechanics
provides the theoretical foundation for hydraulics, which focuses on the applied engineering using the properties of fluids. In its fluid power applications, hydraulics is used for the generation, control, and transmission of power by the use of pressurized liquids
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Pressure Gauge
Pressure
Pressure
measurement is the analysis of an applied force by a fluid (liquid or gas) on a surface. Pressure
Pressure
is typically measured in units of force per unit of surface area. Many techniques have been developed for the measurement of pressure and vacuum. Instruments used to measure and display pressure in an integral unit are called pressure gauges or vacuum gauges. A manometer is a good example as it uses a column of liquid to both measure and indicate pressure
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Diethyl Ether
Diethyl ether, or simply ether, is an organic compound in the ether class with the formula (C 2H 5) 2O, Sometimes abbreviated as Et 2O (see Pseudoelement symbols). It is a colorless, highly volatile flammable liquid. It is commonly used as a solvent in laboratories and as a starting fluid for some engines. It was formerly used as a general anesthetic, until non-flammable drugs were developed, such as halothane. It has been used as a recreational drug to cause intoxication.Contents1 Production 2 Uses2.1 Fuel 2.2 Laboratory uses 2.3 Anesthetic use 2.4 Medical use 2.5 Recreational use3 Metabolism 4 Safety and stability 5 History 6 References 7 External linksProduction[edit] Most diethyl ether is produced as a byproduct of the vapor-phase hydration of ethylene to make ethanol
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Oxygen Mask
An oxygen mask provides a method to transfer breathing oxygen gas from a storage tank to the lungs. Oxygen masks may cover only the nose and mouth (oral nasal mask) or the entire face (full-face mask)
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