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Factory
A factory or manufacturing plant is an industrial site, usually consisting of buildings and machinery, or more commonly a complex having several buildings, where workers manufacture goods or operate machines processing one product into another. Factories arose with the introduction of machinery during the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
when the capital and space requirements became too great for cottage industry or workshops. Early factories that contained small amounts of machinery, such as one or two spinning mules, and fewer than a dozen workers have been called "glorified workshops".[1] Most modern factories have large warehouses or warehouse-like facilities that contain heavy equipment used for assembly line production
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Warmley
Warmley is a village in South Gloucestershire, England.[1] Warmley is situated in between Bristol and Bath. It is a parish, with its own church, and has some minor landmarks, such as a war memorial site, and a statue of Neptune. It has a main lane, the High Street, having a Tesco's and a Post Office, as well as a barber's, and bicycle shops. The War Memorial is a 1914 memorial site, used for a meetup on 11 November. It has many names carved onto the stone structure, of fallen soldiers. Transport[edit] The A420 road runs through the village and connects with the Avon Ring Road immediately west of the village. Beyond Warmley the road routes west towards Bristol and east towards Chippenham. The Midland Railway's line from Bristol as part of the Mangotsfield and Bath Branch Line used to run through the village but closed in the 1960s. The National Cycle Network Bristol & Bath Railway Path runs along the trackbed of the old railway
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Wheel
A wheel is a circular component that is intended to rotate on an axle bearing. The wheel is one of the key components of the wheel and axle which is one of the six simple machines. Wheels, in conjunction with axles, allow heavy objects to be moved easily facilitating movement or transportation while supporting a load, or performing labor in machines. Wheels are also used for other purposes, such as a ship's wheel, steering wheel, potter's wheel and flywheel. Common examples are found in transport applications. A wheel greatly reduces friction by facilitating motion by rolling together with the use of axles. In order for wheels to rotate, a moment needs to be applied to the wheel about its axis, either by way of gravity or by the application of another external force or torque
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Venetian Arsenal
The Venetian Arsenal
Arsenal
(Italian: Arsenale di Venezia) is a complex of former shipyards and armories clustered together in the city of Venice in northern Italy. Owned by the state, the Arsenal
Arsenal
was responsible for the bulk of the Venetian republic's naval power during the middle part of the second millennium AD
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Lyme Regis
Lyme Regis
Lyme Regis
/ˌlaɪmˈriːdʒɪs/ is a town in West Dorset, England, 25 miles (40 km) west of Dorchester and 25 miles (40 km) east of Exeter. It lies at Lyme Bay
Lyme Bay
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast at the Dorset– Devon
Devon
border. It is nicknamed "The Pearl of Dorset". It is noted for fossils found in cliffs and beaches that are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic
Jurassic
Coast—a World Heritage Site. The harbour wall known as "The Cobb" appears in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion, in the John Fowles
John Fowles
novel The French Lieutenant's Woman, and in the 1981 film of the same name, which was partly shot in Lyme Regis. Its one-time mayor and MP was Admiral Sir George Somers, who founded the English colonial settlement of the Somers Isles, now known as Bermuda
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Max Weber
Maximilian Karl Emil "Max" Weber (/ˈveɪbər/;[4] German: [ˈmaks ˈveːbɐ]; 21 April 1864 – 14 June 1920) was a German sociologist, philosopher, jurist, and political economist. His ideas profoundly influenced social theory and social research.[5] Weber is often cited, with Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
and Karl Marx, as among the three founders of sociology.[6][7][8][9][10] Weber was a key proponent of methodological antipositivism, arguing for the study of social action through interpretive (rather than purely empiricist) means, based on understanding the purpose and meaning that individuals attach to their own actions
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Naucratis
Naucratis
Naucratis
or Naukratis (Greek: Ναύκρατις, "Naval Victory";[1] Egyptian: Piemro) was a city of Ancient Egypt, on the Canopic branch of the Nile
Nile
river, and 45 mi (72 km) southeast of the open sea and Alexandria
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Blombos Cave
Blombos
Blombos
Cave
Cave
is an archaeological site located in Blombosfontein Nature Reserve, about 300 km east of Cape Town
Cape Town
on the Southern Cape coastline, South Africa. The cave contains Middle Stone Age deposits currently dated at between c. 100,000 and 70,000 years Before Present (BP), and a Late Stone Age
Late Stone Age
sequence dated at between 2000 and 300 years BP.[1][2][3][4] The cave site was first excavated in 1991 and field work has been conducted there on a regular basis since 1997 – and is ongoing.[5] The excavations at Blombos
Blombos
Cave
Cave
have yielded important new information on the behavioural evolution of modern humans
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Early Modern Human
In paleoanthropology, anatomically modern humans[1] (AMH) is a term used to distinguish Homo sapiens
Homo sapiens
as having an anatomy consistent with the range of phenotypes seen in contemporary humans from varieties of extinct archaic humans. Homo sapiens
Homo sapiens
evolved from "archaic" or "robust" predecessors (Homo heidelbergensis, or a related offshoot from Homo
Homo
erectus) around 315,000 years ago
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Paint
Paint
Paint
is any liquid, liquefiable, or mastic composition that, after application to a substrate in a thin layer, converts to a solid film. It is most commonly used to protect, color, or provide texture to objects. Paint
Paint
can be made or purchased in many colors—and in many different types, such as watercolor, synthetic, etc
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Iron Age
Iron
Iron
Age metallurgy Ancient iron production↓ Ancient historyMediterranean, Greater Persia, South Asia, ChinaHistoriographyGreek, Roman, Chinese, MedievalThe Iron
Iron
Age is the final epoch of the three-age system, preceded by the Stone Age
Stone Age
(Neolithic) and the Bronze
Bronze
Age. It is an archaeological era in the prehistory and protohistory of Europe
Europe
and the Ancient Near East, and by analogy also used of other parts of the Old World
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Žilina
Žilina
Žilina
(Slovak pronunciation: [ˈʒilina]; German: Sillein, [ziˈlaɪ̯n] or [ˈzɪlaɪ̯n]; Hungarian: Zsolna [ˈʒolnɒ]; Polish: Żylina [ʒɨˈlina], names in other languages) is a city in north-western Slovakia, around 200 kilometres (120 mi) from the capital Bratislava, close to both the Czech and Polish borders. It is the fourth largest city of Slovakia
Slovakia
with a population of approximately 85,000, an important industrial center, the largest city on the Váh river, and the seat of a kraj ( Žilina
Žilina
Region) and of an okres ( Žilina
Žilina
District)
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Belisarius
Flavius Belisarius
Belisarius
(Greek: Φλάβιος Βελισάριος, c. 505[2] – 565) was a general of the Byzantine Empire. He was instrumental to Emperor Justinian's ambitious project of reconquering much of the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
territory of the former Western Roman Empire, which had been lost less than a century previously. One of the defining features of Belisarius's career was his success despite varying levels of support from Justinian. His name is frequently given as one of the so-called "Last of the Romans". Belisarius
Belisarius
is considered a military genius, he demolished the Ostrogothic army in Italy
Italy
twice with 7500 men and then 4000 men. Belisarius
Belisarius
was instrumental in the recovery of North Africa, also Belisarius
Belisarius
beat back the Persians from invading and ransacking the Empire
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Pliny The Elder
Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(born Gaius Plinius Secundus, AD 23–79) was a Roman author, naturalist and natural philosopher, a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and friend of emperor Vespasian. Spending most of his spare time studying, writing, and investigating natural and geographic phenomena in the field, Pliny wrote the encyclopedic Naturalis Historia
Naturalis Historia
(Natural History), which became an editorial model for encyclopedias. His nephew, Pliny the Younger, wrote of him in a letter to the historian Tacitus:For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred
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Vitruvius
Marcus Vitruvius
Vitruvius
Pollio (/vɪˈtruːviəs ˈpɒlioʊ/; c. 80–70 BC – after c. 15 BC), commonly known as Vitruvius, was a Roman author, architect, civil engineer and military engineer during the 1st century BC, known for his multi-volume work entitled De architectura.[1] His discussion of perfect proportion in architecture and the human body led to the famous Renaissance
Renaissance
drawing by Da Vinci of Vitruvian Man. By his own description[2] Vitruvius
Vitruvius
served as an artilleryman, the third class of arms in the military offices
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Venice
Venice
Venice
(/ˈvɛnɪs/, VEN-iss; Italian: Venezia, [veˈnɛttsja] ( listen); Venetian: Venesia, [veˈnɛsja]) is a city in northeastern Italy
Italy
and the capital of the Veneto
Veneto
region. It is situated across a group of 118 small islands[1] that are separated by canals and linked by bridges, of which there are 400.[2][3] The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Parts of Venice
Venice
are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, and artwork.[2] The lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a World Heritage Site.[2] In 2014, 264,579 people resided in Comune
Comune
di Venezia, of whom around 55,000 live in the historic city of Venice
Venice
(Centro storico)
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