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F-15 Eagle'A=0
The McDonnell Douglas
McDonnell Douglas
F-15 Eagle is an American twin-engine, all-weather tactical fighter aircraft designed by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing). Following reviews of proposals, the United States Air Force selected McDonnell Douglas's design in 1967 to meet the service's need for a dedicated air superiority fighter. The Eagle first flew in July 1972, and entered service in 1976. It is among the most successful modern fighters, with over 100 victories and no losses in aerial combat, with the majority of the kills by the Israeli Air Force.[3][4] The Eagle has been exported to Israel, Japan, and Saudi Arabia. The F-15 was originally envisioned as a pure air-superiority aircraft. Its design included a secondary ground-attack capability[5] that was largely unused
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F-15 (other)
F15 or F-15 may refer to: Aircraft[edit]McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, an American-designed air-superiority fighter aircraft McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle, an all weather strike fighter derived from the F-15 Eagle Boeing F-15SE Silent Eagle, a stealthy F-15 variant McDonnell Douglas F-15 STOL/MTD, a modified variant of the F-15 Eagle Northrop F-15 Reporter, a photo-reconnaissance variant of the P-61 Black WidowVideo games[edit]F-15 City Wars, a 1990 video game developed by American Video Entertainment on Nintendo F-15 Strike Eagle (video game), a 1984 video game F-15 Strike Eagle II, a 1989 video game F-15 Strike Eagle III, a 1993 video game Jane's F-15, a 1998 video gameOther[edit]BMW X5 (F15) February 15, 2003 anti-war protest the ICD-10 code for mental and behavioural disorders due to
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Variable-sweep Wing
A variable-sweep wing, colloquially known as a "swing wing", is an airplane wing, or set of wings, that may be swept back and then returned to its original position during flight. It allows the aircraft's shape to be modified in flight, and is therefore an example of a variable-geometry aircraft. Typically, a swept wing is more suitable for high speeds, while an unswept wing is suitable for lower speeds, allowing the aircraft to carry more fuel and/or payload, as well as improving field (take-off and landing) performance
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LTV A-7 Corsair II
The LTV A-7 Corsair II
LTV A-7 Corsair II
is an American carrier-capable subsonic light attack aircraft manufactured by Ling-Temco-Vought
Ling-Temco-Vought
(LTV) to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Its airframe design was a somewhat smaller version of the supersonic Vought
Vought
F-8 Crusader. The Corsair II initially entered service with the United States Navy
United States Navy
(USN) during the Vietnam War. It was later adopted by the United States Air Force (USAF), including the Air National Guard, to replace the Douglas A-1 Skyraider and North American F-100 Super Sabre
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Attack Aircraft
An attack aircraft, strike aircraft, or attack bomber, is a tactical military aircraft that has a primary role of carrying out airstrikes with greater precision than bombers, and is prepared to encounter strong low-level air defenses while pressing the attack.[1] This class of aircraft is designed mostly for close air support and naval air-to-surface missions, overlapping the tactical bomber mission. Designs dedicated to non-naval roles are often known as ground-attack aircraft.[2] Fighter aircraft
Fighter aircraft
often carry out the attack role, although they would not be considered attack aircraft per se, although fighter-bomber conversions of those same aircraft would be considered part of the class. Strike fighters, which have effectively replaced the fighter-bomber and light bomber concepts, also differ little from the broad concept of an attack aircraft. The dedicated attack aircraft as a separate class existed primarily during and after World War II
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Northrop F-5
The Northrop F-5A and F-5B Freedom Fighter and the F-5E and F-5F Tiger II are part of a supersonic light fighter family, initially designed in the late 1950s by Northrop Corporation. Being smaller and simpler than contemporaries such as the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, the F-5 cost less to both procure and operate, making it a popular export aircraft. The F-5 started life as a privately funded light fighter program by Northrop in the 1950s. The design team wrapped a small, highly aerodynamic fighter around two compact and high-thrust General Electric J85 engines, focusing on performance and low cost of maintenance. Though primarily designed for the day air superiority role, the aircraft is also a capable ground-attack platform. The F-5A entered service in the early 1960s. During the Cold War, over 800 were produced through 1972 for U.S. allies
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Republic F-105 Thunderchief
The Republic F-105 Thunderchief
Republic F-105 Thunderchief
was a supersonic fighter-bomber used by the United States
United States
Air Force. The Mach 2 capable F-105 conducted the majority of strike bombing missions during the early years of the Vietnam War; it was the only U.S. aircraft to have been removed from combat due to high loss rates.[2] Originally designed as a single-seat, nuclear-attack aircraft, a two-seat Wild Weasel
Wild Weasel
version was later developed for the specialized Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) role against surface-to-air missile sites. The F-105 was commonly known as the "Thud" by its crews. As a follow-on to the Mach 1 capable North American F-100 Super Sabre, the F-105 was also armed with missiles and a cannon; however, its design was tailored to high-speed low-altitude penetration carrying a single nuclear weapon internally
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MiG-17
The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17
(Russian: Микоян и Гуревич МиГ-17; NATO reporting name: Fresco)[1] is a high-subsonic fighter aircraft produced in the USSR from 1952 and operated by numerous air forces in many variants. It is an advanced development of the very similar appearing MiG-15 of the Korean War. The MiG-17 was license-built in China
China
as the Shenyang J-5
Shenyang J-5
and Poland
Poland
as the PZL-Mielec
PZL-Mielec
Lim-6. MiG-17s first saw combat in 1958 in the Second Taiwan Strait Crisis and later proved to be an effective threat against more modern supersonic fighters of the United States
United States
in the Vietnam
Vietnam
War. It was also briefly known as the Type 38 by U.S. Air Force
U.S

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Harold Brown (Secretary Of Defense)
Harold Brown (born September 19, 1927) is an American scientist who served as U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1977 to 1981 in the cabinet of President Jimmy Carter. He had previously served in the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson
Lyndon Johnson
administrations as Director of Defense Research and Engineering and Secretary of the Air Force.[1] In the last stages of the Cold War, as Secretary of Defense, he set the groundwork for the Camp David accords. He took part in the strategic arms negotiations with the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and supported, unsuccessfully, ratification of the SALT II
SALT II
treaty
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Assistant Secretary Of Defense For Research And Engineering
The Under Secretary of Defense
Under Secretary of Defense
for Research and Engineering (USD(R&E)) is a senior official of the United States Department of Defense. The USD(R&E) and the office s/he heads are charged with the development and oversight of DoD technology strategy for the DoD. The post (or effectively the same post) has at various times had the titles Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E)), or Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E)
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Gabriel P. Disosway
General Gabriel Poillon Disosway (June 11, 1910 – February 23, 2001) was a noted United States
United States
Air Force four-star general and served as commander of the Tactical Air Command. A native of Pomona, California, Disosway graduated from Wichita Falls High School in Wichita Falls, Texas
Wichita Falls, Texas
in 1927 and then attended the University of Oklahoma. He entered the United States
United States
Military Academy in July 1929, graduated and was commissioned a second lieutenant of Field Artillery in June 1933. He entered Primary Flying School at Randolph Field, Texas, and upon completion of the course, transferred to the Advanced Flying School at Kelly Field, Texas, from which he graduated in October 1934. He transferred from the Field Artillery to the Air Corps in January 1935. Disosway's first assignments were with the 71st Service and 55th Pursuit Squadrons at Barksdale Field, Louisiana
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Tactical Air Command
Tactical Air Command
Tactical Air Command
(TAC) is an inactive United States Air Force organization. It was a Major Command of the United States Air Force, established on 21 March 1946 and headquartered at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. It was inactivated on 1 June 1992 and its personnel and equipment absorbed by Air Combat Command
Air Combat Command
(ACC). Tactical Air Command
Tactical Air Command
was established to provide a balance between strategic, air defense, and tactical forces of the post–World War II U.S. Army Air Forces
U.S. Army Air Forces
followed by, in 1947, the U.S. Air Force. In 1948, the Continental Air Command
Continental Air Command
assumed control over air defense, tactical air, and air reserve forces
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Request For Proposal
A request for proposal (RFP) is a document that solicits proposal, often made through a bidding process, by an agency or company interested in procurement of a commodity, service, or valuable asset, to potential suppliers to submit business proposals.[1] It is submitted early in the procurement cycle, either at the preliminary study, or procurement stage.Contents1 Overview 2 Specifications 3 Other requests 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] An RFP is used where the request requires technical expertise, specialized capability, or where the product or service being requested does not yet exist, and the proposal may require research and development to create whatever is being requested. The RFP presents preliminary requirements for the commodity or service, and may dictate to varying degrees the exact structure and format of the supplier's response
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Mach Number
In fluid dynamics, the Mach number
Mach number
(M or Ma) (/mɑːx/; German: [maχ]) is a dimensionless quantity representing the ratio of flow velocity past a boundary to the local speed of sound.[1][2] M = u c , displaystyle mathrm M = frac u c , where:M is the Mach number, u is the local flow velocity with respect to the boundaries (either internal, such as an object immersed in the flow, or external, like a channel), and c is the speed of sound in the medium.By definition, at Mach 1 the local flow velocity u is equal to the speed of sound
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Light Bomber
A light bomber is a relatively small and fast type of military bomber aircraft that was primarily employed before the 1950s. Such aircraft would typically not carry more than one ton of ordnance. During World War I
World War I
some air forces began to distinguish between light bombers and the earliest purpose-built attack aircraft (i.e. designs intended for ground attack and maritime strike sorties) which carried out close air support, anti-shipping and similar missions. After World War I, attack aircraft were usually identifiable through their ability to carry multiple, fixed machine guns, automatic cannons and rockets in addition to, or instead of, bombs. Nevertheless, purpose-built light bombers have often served as attack aircraft and vice versa. A sub-type of light bomber also emerged, the fast bomber (German Schnellbomber), which prioritised speed as a self-defense measure; even the bombload was minimised towards this end
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Thrust-to-weight Ratio
Thrust-to-weight ratio
Thrust-to-weight ratio
is a dimensionless ratio of thrust to weight of a rocket, jet engine, propeller engine, or a vehicle propelled by such an engine that indicates the performance of the engine or vehicle. The instantaneous thrust-to-weight ratio of a vehicle varies continually during operation due to progressive consumption of fuel or propellant and in some cases a gravity gradient. The thrust-to-weight ratio based on initial thrust and weight is often published and used as a figure of merit for quantitative comparison of the initial performance of vehicles.Contents1 Calculation 2 Aircraft2.1 Propeller-driven aircraft3 Rockets 4 Examples4.1 Aircraft 4.2 Jet and rocket engines 4.3 Fighter aircraft5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes7 External linksCalculation[edit] The thrust-to-weight ratio can be calculated by dividing the thrust (in SI units – in newtons) by the weight (in newtons) of the engine or vehicle
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