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F-104
The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
is a single-engine, supersonic interceptor aircraft which later became widely used as an attack aircraft. It was originally developed by Lockheed for the United States Air Force (USAF), but was later produced by several other nations, seeing widespread service outside the United States. One of the Century Series
Century Series
of fighter aircraft, it was operated by the air forces of more than a dozen nations from 1958 to 2004. Its design team was led by Kelly Johnson, who contributed to the development of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning, Lockheed U-2, Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird
Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird
and other Lockheed aircraft.[2] The F-104 set numerous world records, including both airspeed and altitude records
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U.S. Air Force
Department of Defense Department of the Air ForceHeadquarters The Pentagon Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.Motto(s) "Aim High ... Fly-Fight-Win"[7] "Integrity first, Service before self, Excellence in all we do"[8]Colors Ultramarine
Ultramarine
blue, Golden yellow[9]          March The U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
 Play (help·info)Anniversaries 18 SeptemberEngagementsSee listMexican Expedition (As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps) World War I
World War I
(As Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
Aviation Section, U.S

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Mock-up
In manufacturing and design, a mockup, or mock-up, is a scale or full-size model of a design or device, used for teaching, demonstration, design evaluation, promotion, and other purposes. A mockup is a prototype if it provides at least part of the functionality of a system and enables testing of a design.[1] Mock-ups are used by designers mainly to acquire feedback from users
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Delta-wing
The delta wing is a wing shaped in the form of a triangle. It is named for its similarity in shape to the Greek uppercase letter delta (Δ).Contents1 History1.1 Early research 1.2 Postwar production 1.3 Supersonic
Supersonic
deltas 1.4 Close-coupled canard delta 1.5 Supersonic
Supersonic
transport2 Design variations 3 Aerodynamics3.1 General characteristics 3.2 Low-speed characteristics 3.3 Transonic
Transonic
and supersonic characteristics 3.4 The canard delta 3.5 The tailed delta4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early research[edit] Triangular stabilizing fins for rockets were described ca
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Swept-wing
A swept wing is a wing that angles either backward or, occasionally, forward, from its root rather than in a straight sideways direction. Wing
Wing
sweep has the effect of delaying the shock waves and accompanying aerodynamic drag rise caused by fluid compressibility near the speed of sound, improving performance. Swept wings are therefore often used on jet aircraft designed to fly at these speeds. Swept wings are also sometimes used for other reasons, such as structural convenience or visibility. Wing
Wing
sweep at high speeds was first investigated in Germany as early as 1935, but it found no application until just before the end of the Second World War. Swept wings became common on advanced first-generation jet fighters like the MiG-15
MiG-15
and F-86 Sabre, which demonstrated a decisive superiority over the slower first generation of straight-wing jet fighters during the Korean War
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AIM-9 Sidewinder
The AIM-9 Sidewinder
AIM-9 Sidewinder
is a short-range air-to-air missile developed by the United States Navy
United States Navy
at China Lake, California, in the 1950s, and subsequently adopted by the United States
United States
Air Force. Since its entry into service in 1956, the Sidewinder has proved to be an enduring international success, and its latest variants are still standard equipment in most western-aligned air forces.[3] The Soviet K-13, a reverse-engineered copy of the AIM-9, was also widely adopted by a number of nations. The majority of Sidewinder variants utilize infrared homing for guidance; the AIM-9C variant used semi-active radar homing and served as the basis of the AGM-122 Sidearm
AGM-122 Sidearm
anti-radar missile. The Sidewinder is the most widely used missile in the West, with more than 110,000 missiles produced for the U.S
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Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
is a classic magazine of popular science and technology. Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
was first published by Henry Haven Windsor, January 11, 1902. It has been owned since 1958 by Hearst Communications. There are nine[3] international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades, and a newer South African edition. The Russian edition of Popular Mechanics has been issued since 2002
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Maiden Flight
The maiden flight of an aircraft is the first occasion on which an aircraft leaves the ground under its own power. The same term is also used for the first launch of rockets. The first flight of a new aircraft type is always a historic occasion for the type and can be quite emotional for those involved. In the early days of aviation it could be dangerous, because the exact handling characteristics of the aircraft were generally unknown. The first flight of a new type is almost invariably flown by a highly experienced test pilot. First flights are usually accompanied by a chase plane, to verify items like altitude, airspeed, and general airworthiness. A first flight is only one stage in the development of an aircraft type. Unless the type is a pure research aircraft (such as the X-15), the aircraft must be tested extensively to ensure that it delivers the desired performance with an acceptable margin of safety
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Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire
The Armstrong Siddeley
Armstrong Siddeley
Sapphire was a British turbojet engine produced by Armstrong Siddeley
Armstrong Siddeley
in the 1950s. It was the ultimate development of work that had started as the Metrovick F.2 in 1940, evolving into an advanced axial flow design with an annular combustion chamber that developed over 11,000 lbf (49 kN). It powered early versions of the Hawker Hunter
Hawker Hunter
and Handley Page Victor, and every Gloster Javelin. Production was also started under licence in the United States by Wright Aeronautical
Wright Aeronautical
as the J65, powering a number of US designs
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Prototype
A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of a product built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from.[1] It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics, design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is generally used to evaluate a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users.[2] Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one.[3] In some design workflow models, creating a prototype (a process sometimes called materialization) is the step between the formalization and the evaluation of an idea.[4] The word prototype derives from the Greek πρωτότυπον prototypon, "primitive form", neutral of πρωτότυπος prototypos, "original, primitive", from πρῶτος protos, "first" and τύπος typos, "impression".[1][5]Contents1 Basic prototype categories 2 Differences in creating a prototype vs
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Northrop N-102 Fang
The Northrop N-102 Fang was a fighter aircraft design created by Northrop Corporation and proposed to the United States Air Force in 1953.[1] It was powered by one General Electric J79 turbojet engine, though the designers believed two engines would increase the reliability and safety margin.[2] It loosely formed the basis of the F-5 fighter family.[3] The design was the subject of a 1957 design patent.[4] References[edit]^ "A Rand note" (1787 to 1798). Rand Corporation. 1982: 60.  ^ General Electric Company (1979). Seven decades of progress: a heritage of aircraft turbine technology. Fallbrook, CA: Aero Publishers. p. 108. ISBN 0-8168-8355-6.  ^ Lorell, Mark A.; Levaux, Hugh P. (1998). The cutting edge: a half century of fighter aircraft R&D. RAND Corporation
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Northrop Corporation
Northrop Corporation
Northrop Corporation
was a leading United States aircraft manufacturer from its formation in 1939 until its 1994 merger with Grumman
Grumman
to form Northrop Grumman. The company is known for its development of the flying wing design, most successfully the B-2 Spirit
B-2 Spirit
stealth bomber.[1] Northrop Corporation
Northrop Corporation
F-5E Tiger II
F-5E Tiger II
of the Swiss Air Force
Swiss Air Force
arrives at the 2016 RIAT, EnglandContents1 History 2 Aircraft 3 Unmanned aerial vehicles 4 Missiles 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Jack Northrop founded three companies using his name
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North American Aviation
North American Aviation
North American Aviation
(NAA) was a major American aerospace manufacturer, responsible for a number of historic aircraft, including the T-6 Texan trainer, the P-51 Mustang fighter, the B-25 Mitchell bomber, the F-86 Sabre jet fighter, the X-15 rocket plane, and the XB-70, as well as Apollo Command and Service Module, the second stage of the Saturn V
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Republic Aviation Company
The Republic Aviation Corporation was an American aircraft manufacturer based in Farmingdale, Long Island, New York. Originally known as the Seversky Aircraft Company, the company was responsible for the design and production of many important military aircraft, including its most famous products: World War II's P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, the F-84 Thunderjet and F-105 Thunderchief jet fighters, as well as the A-10 Thunderbolt II close-support aircraft.Contents1 Seversky Aircraft 2 P-47 Thunderbolt 3 RC-3 Seabee 4 F-84 family 5 F-105 Thunderchief 6 The final years 7 Legacy 8 Aircraft list 9 References 10 External linksSeversky Aircraft[edit] The Seversky Aircraft Company was founded in 1931 by Alexander de Seversky, a Russian expatriate and veteran World War I pilot who had lost a leg in the war
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Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15
The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15
MiG-15
(Russian: Микоян и Гуревич МиГ-15; USAF/DoD designation: Type 14; NATO
NATO
reporting name: Fagot) was a jet fighter aircraft developed by Mikoyan-Gurevich for the Soviet
Soviet
Union. The MiG-15
MiG-15
was one of the first successful jet fighters to incorporate swept wings to achieve high transonic speeds. In combat over Korea, it outclassed straight-winged jet day fighters, which were largely relegated to ground-attack roles, and was quickly countered by the similar American swept-wing North American F-86
F-86
Sabre
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Supersonic
Supersonic travel is a rate of travel of an object that exceeds the speed of sound (Mach 1). For objects traveling in dry air of a temperature of 20 °C (68 °F) at sea level, this speed is approximately 343 m/s, 1,125 ft/s, 768 mph, 667 knots, or 1,235 km/h. Speeds greater than five times the speed of sound (Mach 5) are often referred to as hypersonic. Flights during which only some parts of the air surrounding an object, such as the ends of rotor blades, reach supersonic speeds are called transonic. This occurs typically somewhere between Mach 0.8 and Mach 1.23. Sounds are traveling vibrations in the form of pressure waves in an elastic medium. In gases, sound travels longitudinally at different speeds, mostly depending on the molecular mass and temperature of the gas, and pressure has little effect
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