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Eva Marshal
Eva Marshal
Eva Marshal
(1203–1246) was a Cambro-Norman
Cambro-Norman
noblewoman and the wife of the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose. She was the daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and the granddaughter of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster. She held de Braose lands and castles in her own right following the public hanging of her husband by the orders of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales.Contents1 Family and marriage1.1 Issue2 Widowhood 3 Ancestry 4 Notes 5 References 6 SourcesFamily and marriage[edit] Lady Eva was born in 1203, in Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales, the fifth daughter[1] and tenth child of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke
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Pembroke Castle
Pembroke Castle
Castle
(Welsh: Castell Penfro) is a medieval castle in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, West Wales. The castle was the original family seat of the Earldom of Pembroke. A Grade I listed building since 1951, it underwent major restoration during the early 20th century.[1] In 1093 Arnulf of Montgomery
Arnulf of Montgomery
built the first castle at the site when he fortified the promontory beside the Pembroke River during the Norman invasion of Wales.[2] A century later, the castle was given by Richard I to William Marshal, who became one of the most powerful men in 12th-century Britain
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Prince Of Wales
Prince of Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) was a title granted to princes born in Wales
Wales
from the 12th century onwards; the term replaced the use of the word king. One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward (born in Caernarfon Castle
Caernarfon Castle
in Wales) was invested as the first English Prince of Wales
Wales
in 1301. Since the 14th century, the title has been a dynastic title granted to the heir apparent to the English or British monarch, but the failure to be granted the title does not affect the rights to royal succession. The title is granted to the heir apparent as a personal honour or dignity, and is not heritable, merging with the Crown on accession to the throne
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Totnes
Totnes
Totnes
(/ˈtɒtnɪs/ or /tɒtˈnɛs/) is a market town and civil parish at the head of the estuary of the River Dart
River Dart
in Devon, England within the South Devon
Devon
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is about 22 miles (35 km) south-west of Exeter
Exeter
and is the administrative centre of the South Hams
South Hams
District Council. Totnes
Totnes
has a long recorded history, dating back to AD 907, when its first castle was built. By the twelfth century it was already an important market town, and its former wealth and importance may be seen from the number of merchants' houses built in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Today, the town is a thriving centre for music, art, theatre and natural health
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Joan, Lady Of Wales
Joan, Lady of Wales
Wales
and Lady of Snowdon, also known by her Welsh name of Siwan, (c. 1191 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
and Gwynedd, effective ruler of most of Wales.Contents1 Early life 2 Marriage2.1 Adultery with William de Braose3 Death and burial 4 Fiction 5 References 6 SourcesEarly life[edit] Joan was an illegitimate daughter of King John of England. She should not be confused with her half-sister, Joan, Queen consort of Scotland. Little is known about her early life. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury
Tewkesbury
Annals, where she is called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence); there is no evidence that her mother was in fact of royal blood
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Llanthony Secunda
Llanthony Secunda
Llanthony Secunda
Priory
Priory
is a ruined former Augustinian
Augustinian
priory in Hempsted, Gloucester, England
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Robert De Ferrers, 6th Earl Of Derby
Robert de Ferrers, 6th Earl of Derby
Earl of Derby
(1239–1279) was an English nobleman. He was born at Tutbury Castle
Tutbury Castle
in Staffordshire, England, the son of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby, by his second wife Margaret de Quincy (born 1218), a daughter of Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester and Helen of Galloway.Contents1 Early years 2 Inheritance 3 Baronial unrest 4 Retribution 5 Rebellion once more 6 Declining years 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further readingEarly years[edit] In 1249, at the age of 10, he married the seven-year-old Mary (or Marie), daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan Count of La Marche, the eldest of Henry III's half-brothers, at Westminster Abbey. This arranged marriage is an indication of Henry's high regard for Robert's father. William died in 1254, so that Robert became a knight and inherited the title while he was still a minor. He and his estates became a ward of Prince Edward
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Dower
Dower
Dower
is a provision accorded by law, but traditionally by a husband or his family, to a wife for her support in the event that she should become widowed. It was settled on the bride (being gifted into trust) by agreement at the time of the wedding, or as provided by law. The dower grew out of the Germanic practice of bride price (Old English weotuma), which was given over to a bride's family well in advance for arranging the marriage, but during the early Middle Ages, was given directly to the bride instead. However, in popular parlance, the term may be used for a life interest in property settled by a husband on his wife at any time, not just at the wedding. The verb to dower is sometimes used. In popular usage, the term dower may be confused with:A dowager is a widow (who may receive her dower). The term is especially used of a noble or royal widow who no longer occupies the position she held during the marriage
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Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl Of Pembroke
Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke
Earl of Pembroke
(1191 – 16 April 1234) was the son of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke
William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke
and brother of William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, whom he succeeded to the Earldom of Pembroke and Lord Marshal of England
England
upon his brother's death on 6 April 1231. He held lands in Longueville, in Wales and also in Ireland. Richard Marshal came to the fore as the leader of the baronial party, and the chief antagonist of the foreign friends of King Henry III of England, a notable Poitevin, Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester and Peter de Rivaux.[1] Fearing their treachery, he refused to visit King Henry III at Gloucester
Gloucester
in August 1233, and he was declared a traitor
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Isabella Mortimer
Isabella Mortimer, Lady of Clun
Clun
and Oswestry
Oswestry
(born after 1247; died before 1 April 1292[1]) was a noblewoman and a member of an important and powerful Welsh Marcher family. Although often overshadowed in modern historiography by her better-known parents, she is now known to have played an important part in her family's struggles against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
and to have helped to secure the frontline at Shropshire in the run-up to English conquest of Wales. She was the wife and widow of John III FitzAlan, baron of Clun
Clun
and Oswestry
Oswestry
and de jure earl of Arundel
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Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer
Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Lord Mortimer (1251 – 17 July 1304)[1] was the second son and eventual heir of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer. His mother was Maud de Braose. As a younger son, Edmund had been intended for clerical or monastic life, and had been sent to study at Oxford University. He was made Treasurer of York
York
in 1265. By 1268 he is recorded as studying Theology in the house of the Archbishop of York. King Henry III showed favour by supplementing his diet with the luxury of venison. The sudden death of his elder brother, Ralph, in 1274,[2] made him heir to the family estates; yet he continued to study at Oxford. But his father's death eventually forced his departure. He returned to the March in 1282 as the new Lord Mortimer of Wigmore and immediately became involved in Welsh Marches
Welsh Marches
politics
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Nobility
Nobility
Nobility
is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g., precedence), and vary by country and era
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Dafydd Ap Llywelyn
Dafydd ap Llywelyn
Dafydd ap Llywelyn
(c. March 1212 – 25 February 1246) was Prince of Gwynedd
Gwynedd
from 1240 to 1246. He was the first ruler to claim the title Prince of Wales.Contents1 Birth and descent 2 Conflict 3 Later reign and death 4 Succession 5 ReferencesBirth and descent[edit] Though birth years of 1208, 1206, and 1215 have been put forward for Dafydd, it has recently been persuasively argued that he was born shortly after Easter 1212. Born at Castell Hen Blas, Coleshill, Bagillt
Bagillt
in Flintshire, he was the only son of Llywelyn the Great
Llywelyn the Great
by his wife, Joan (daughter of King John). His grandfather was facing trouble in England against his Barons when he was born. In his final years, Llywelyn went to great lengths to have Dafydd accepted as his sole heir. By Welsh law, Dafydd's older half-brother Gruffydd had a claim to be Llywelyn's successor
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Reginald De Braose
Reginald de Braose
Reginald de Braose
(died June 1228) was one of the sons of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Matilda, also known as Maud de St. Valery and Lady de la Haie. Her other children included William and Giles.[1] The de Braoses were loyal to King
King
Richard I but grew in power under King
King
John of England. The dynasty was in conflict with King
King
John towards the end of his reign and almost lost everything. Reginald de Braose
Reginald de Braose
was a scion of the powerful Marcher family of de Braose, helped manage its survival and was also related by marriage to the Welsh Princes of Wales.Contents1 Magna Carta 2 Restoration of royal favour 3 Welsh wars 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesMagna Carta[edit] He supported his brother Giles de Braose in his rebellions against King
King
John
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Welsh Marches
The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales
Wales
in the United Kingdom. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. Historically, the English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae)[1] was originally used in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to denote the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, exercised to some extent independently of the king of England
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John Marshal (Earl Marshal)
John FitzGilbert the Marshal of the Horses (c. 1105 – 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet
River Kennet
in Wiltshire. Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester
Winchester
and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall
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