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Eugene O'Neill Theatre
The Eugene O'Neill
Eugene O'Neill
Theatre is a Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
located at 230 West 49th Street in Midtown Manhattan. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it was built for the Shuberts as part of a theatre-hotel complex named for 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest. The Forrest Theatre opened on November 24, 1925, with the musical Mayflowers as its premiere production. The venue was renamed the Coronet Theatre in 1945, with renovations by architects Walker & Gillette. In 1959 it was rechristened the O'Neill in honor of the American playwright by then-owner Lester Osterman
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Walker & Gillette
Walker & Gillette was an architectural firm based in New York City, the partnership of A. Stewart Walker (1876–1952)[1] and Leon N. Gillette (1878–1945),[2] active from 1906 through 1945.Contents1 Biographies 2 Company history 3 Notable works 4 ReferencesBiographies[edit] Walker was a native of Jersey City, New Jersey, and graduated from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1898. Leon Gillette, born in Malden, Massachusetts, had attended the University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
and worked in several New York firms, such as Howells & Stokes and Warren & Wetmore, and had also attended the École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
from 1901 through 1903. The two joined forces in 1906. Walker's wife, Sybil Kane Walker, was a decorator who worked with her husband on at least one commission
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The Bad Seed (play)
The Bad Seed
The Bad Seed
is a 1954 play by American playwright Maxwell Anderson, adapted from the novel of the same name by American writer William March.Contents1 Plot 2 Production 3 Film adaptation 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] The play focuses on the seemingly perfect little girl Rhoda Penmark, who is able to charm her way into getting just about anything she wants. Anything, except a highly coveted penmanship medal that her teacher has awarded to Claude Daigle, one of Rhoda's classmates. During a school outing near the shore, Claude goes missing and it is soon discovered that Claude has drowned near a pier. Rhoda's mother, Christine, begins to suspect that Rhoda had something to do with the boy's death when she finds Claude's penmanship medal hidden in Rhoda's room
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Tobacco Road (novel)
Tobacco Road is a 1932 novel by Erskine Caldwell about Georgia sharecroppers. It was dramatized for Broadway by Jack Kirkland in 1933, and ran for eight years, an astounding feat for a non-musical, and remains the second-longest running play in Broadway history. A 1941 film version, deliberately played mainly for laughs, was directed by John Ford, and the storyline was considerably altered. The novel itself was included in Life magazine's list of the 100 outstanding books of 1924–1944.[1]Contents1 Plot introduction 2 Plot summary 3 In popular culture 4 References 5 External linksPlot introduction[edit] Tobacco Road is set in rural Georgia, several miles outside Augusta, Georgia during the worst years of the Great Depression. It depicts a family of poor white tenant farmers, the Lesters, as one of the many small Southern cotton farmers made redundant by the industrialization of production and the migration into cities
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Musical Theatre
Musical theatre
Musical theatre
is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. Although musical theatre overlaps with other theatrical forms like opera and dance, it may be distinguished by the equal importance given to the music as compared with the dialogue, movement and other elements. Since the early 20th century, musical theatre stage works have generally been called, simply, musicals. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America
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The Little Hut
The Little Hut
The Little Hut
is a 1957 British-American romantic comedy film made by MGM
MGM
starring Ava Gardner, Stewart Granger
Stewart Granger
and David Niven. It was directed by Mark Robson, produced by Robson and F. Hugh Herbert, from a screenplay by Herbert, adapted by Nancy Mitford
Nancy Mitford
from the play La petite hutte by André Roussin.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Reception 5 Notes and references 6 External linksPlot[edit] Sir Philip Ashlow (Granger), his neglected wife, Lady Susan Ashlow (Gardner) and his best friend Henry Brittingham-Brett (Niven) are shipwrecked on a desert island. Susan feels neglected and has been trying to make Philip jealous by demonstrating a romantic interest in Henry, who begins taking her seriously
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Tragedian
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabe
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Hotel
A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. Facilities provided may range from a modest-quality mattress in a small room to large suites with bigger, higher-quality beds, a dresser, a refrigerator and other kitchen facilities, upholstered chairs, a flat screen television and en-suite bathrooms. Small, lower-priced hotels may offer only the most basic guest services and facilities. Larger, higher-priced hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business centre (with computers, printers and other office equipment), childcare, conference and event facilities, tennis or basketball courts, gymnasium, restaurants, day spa and social function services. Hotel
Hotel
rooms are usually numbered (or named in some smaller hotels and B&Bs) to allow guests to identify their room. Some boutique, high-end hotels have custom decorated rooms. Some hotels offer meals as part of a room and board arrangement
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Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan, or Midtown, represents the central lengthwise portion of the borough and island of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City. Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the headquarters of the United Nations, and it contains world-renowned commercial zones such as Rockefeller Center, Broadway, and Times Square. Midtown Manhattan
Manhattan
is the largest central business district in the world and ranks among the most expensive and intensely used pieces of real estate in the world, and Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue
in Midtown Manhattan commands the world's highest retail rents, with average annual rents at US$3,000 per square foot ($32,000/m2) in 2017.[1] While Lower Manhattan
Manhattan
is the main financial center, Midtown is the country's largest commercial, entertainment, and media center
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Neil Simon
Marvin Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(born July 4, 1927) is an American playwright, screenwriter and author. He has written more than 30 plays and nearly the same number of movie screenplays, mostly adaptations of his plays. He has received more combined Oscar and Tony nominations than any other writer.[2] Simon grew up in New York during the Great Depression, with his parents' financial hardships affecting their marriage, giving him a mostly unhappy and unstable childhood. He often took refuge in movie theaters where he enjoyed watching the early comedians like Charlie Chaplin. After a few years in the Army Air Force Reserve, and after graduating from high school, he began writing comedy scripts for radio and some popular early television shows
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Theatre (structure)
A theater, theatre or playhouse, is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed, or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. While a theater is not required for performance (as in environmental theater or street theater), a theater serves to define the performance and audience spaces. The facility is traditionally organized to provide support areas for performers, the technical crew and the audience members. There are as many types of theaters as there are types of performance. Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater. They may range from open-air amphitheaters to ornate, cathedral-like structures to simple, undecorated rooms or black box theaters
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Seating Capacity
Seating capacity
Seating capacity
is the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law. Seating capacity
Seating capacity
can be used in the description of anything ranging from an automobile that seats two to a stadium that seats hundreds of thousands of people
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Annie (musical)
Annie
Annie
is a Broadway musical based upon the popular Harold Gray
Harold Gray
comic strip Little Orphan Annie, with music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin, and book by Thomas Meehan. The original Broadway production opened in 1977 and ran for nearly six years, setting a record for the Alvin Theatre
Alvin Theatre
(now the Neil Simon Theatre).[1] It spawned numerous productions in many countries, as well as national tours, and won the Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Musical
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Playwright
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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A Memory Of Two Mondays
A Memory of Two Mondays is a one-act play by Arthur Miller. Based on Miller's own experiences, the play focuses on a group of desperate workers earning their livings in a Brooklyn automobile parts warehouse during the Great Depression in the 1930s, a time of 25 percent unemployment in the United States. Concentrating more on character than plot, it explores the dreams of a young man yearning for a college education in the midst of people stumbling through the workday in a haze of hopelessness and despondency. Three of the characters in the story have severe problems with alcoholism. Paired with the original one-act version of A View from the Bridge, the first Broadway production, directed by Martin Ritt, opened on September 29, 1955, at the Coronet Theatre, where it ran for 149 performances. The cast included Van Heflin, J
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