HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ethnobotany
Ethnobotany
Ethnobotany
is the study of a region's plants and their practical uses through the traditional knowledge of a local culture and people.[1] An ethnobotanist thus strives to document the local customs involving the practical uses of local flora for many aspects of life, such as plants as medicines, foods, and clothing.[2] Richard Evans Schultes, often referred to as the "father of ethnobotany",[3] explained the discipline in this way: Ethnobotany
Ethnobotany
simply means ..
[...More...]

"Ethnobotany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Journal Of Ethnopharmacology
The Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Ethnopharmacology
is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering the traditional medicinal use of plants and other substances. It is the official journal of the International Society for Ethnopharmacology. The journal is included in the Index Medicus (MEDLINE).[1] References[edit]^ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog?db=journals&term=%22J+Ethnopharmacol%22%5BTitle+Abbreviation%5DExternal links[edit]Official website International Society for EthnopharmacologyThis article about a scientific journal on pharmacology is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals. Further suggestions might be found on the article's talk page.This article about ethnicity or ethnology is a stub
[...More...]

"Journal Of Ethnopharmacology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Emic
In anthropology, folkloristics, and the social and behavioral sciences, emic and etic refer to two kinds of field research done and viewpoints obtained:[1] emic, from within the social group (from the perspective of the subject) and etic, from outside (from the perspective of the observer).Contents1 Definitions 2 History 3 Importance as regards personality 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDefinitions[edit] "The emic approach investigates how local people think" (Kottak, 2006): How they perceive and categorize the world, their rules for behavior, what has meaning for them, and how they imagine and explain things. "The etic (scientist-oriented) approach shifts the focus from local observations, categories, explanations, and interpretations to those of the anthropologist. The etic approach realizes that members of a culture often are too involved in what they are doing..... to interpret their cultures impartially
[...More...]

"Emic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lewis And Clark Expedition
The Lewis and Clark Expedition
Lewis and Clark Expedition
from May 1804 to September 1806, also known as the Corps of Discovery
Corps of Discovery
Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross what is now the western portion of the United States. It began near St. Louis, made its way westward, and passed through the continental divide to reach the Pacific coast. The Corps of Discovery comprised a selected group of U.S
[...More...]

"Lewis And Clark Expedition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ayurveda
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Ayurveda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Material Culture
Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation, and trade of objects as well as the behaviors, norms, and rituals that the objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence that can be attributed to culture in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field that tells of the relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on both theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others
[...More...]

"Material Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Basin
The Great Basin
Great Basin
is the largest area of contiguous endorheic watersheds in North America. It spans sections of Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Oregon, California
California
and the Mexican state of Baja California. It is noted for both its arid climate and the basin and range topography that varies from the North American low point at Badwater Basin
Badwater Basin
to the highest point of the contiguous United States, less than 100 miles (160 km) away at the summit of Mount Whitney
[...More...]

"Great Basin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amazon Rainforest
The Amazon rainforest
Amazon rainforest
(Portuguese: Floresta Amazônica or Amazônia; Spanish: Selva Amazónica, Amazonía or usually Amazonia; French: Forêt amazonienne; Dutch: Amazoneregenwoud), also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf forest in the Amazon biome
Amazon biome
that covers most of the Amazon basin
Amazon basin
of South America. This basin encompasses 7,000,000 km2 (2,700,000 sq mi), of which 5,500,000 km2 (2,100,000 sq mi) are covered by the rainforest. This region includes territory belonging to nine nations. The majority of the forest is contained within Brazil, with 60% of the rainforest, followed by Peru
Peru
with 13%, Colombia
Colombia
with 10%, and with minor amounts in Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname
Suriname
and French Guiana
[...More...]

"Amazon Rainforest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
[...More...]

"Textile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frank Hamilton Cushing
Frank Hamilton Cushing
Frank Hamilton Cushing
(July 22, 1857 in North East Township, Erie County, Pennsylvania – April 10, 1900 in Washington DC) was an American anthropologist and ethnologist. He made pioneering studies of the Zuni Indians
Zuni Indians
of New Mexico
New Mexico
by entering into their culture; his work helped establish participant observation as a common anthropological research strategy.Contents1 Early life 2 Work at Zuni 3 Later years 4 Significance of work 5 Cushing's books on Zuni 6 Other works by Cushing 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Cushing was born in North East, Pennsylvania. He later moved with his family to western New York. As a boy he took an interest in the Native American artifacts in the surrounding countryside and taught himself how to knap flint (make arrowheads and such from flint)
[...More...]

"Frank Hamilton Cushing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suriname
Coordinates: 4°N 56°W / 4°N 56°W / 4; -56 Republic
Republic
of Suriname Republiek Suriname  (Dutch)FlagCoat of armsMotto: " Justitia
Justitia

[...More...]

"Suriname" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IMAX
IMAX
IMAX
is a 70 mm motion picture film format that displays images of greater size and resolution than conventional film systems. Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, Robert Kerr, and William C. Shaw developed the IMAX
IMAX
cinema projection standards in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Canada.[1] Unlike conventional projectors, the film runs horizontally (see diagram sprocket holes) so that the image width is greater than the width of the film. Since 2002, some feature films have been converted into IMAX
IMAX
format for displaying in IMAX
IMAX
theatres, and some have also been partially shot in IMAX. IMAX
IMAX
is the most widely used system for special-venue film presentations
[...More...]

"IMAX" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Peabody Harrington
John Peabody Harrington
John Peabody Harrington
(April 29, 1884 – October 21, 1961) was an American linguist and ethnologist and a specialist in the native peoples of California. Harrington is noted for the massive volume of his documentary output, most of which has remained unpublished: the shelf space in the National Anthropological Archives
National Anthropological Archives
dedicated to his work spans nearly seven hundred feet.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Linguistic legacy 3 Personal life 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Waltham, Massachusetts, Harrington moved to California
California
as a child. From 1902 to 1905, Harrington studied anthropology and classical languages at Stanford University. While attending specialized classes at the University of California, Berkeley, he met anthropologist Alfred L. Kroeber
[...More...]

"John Peabody Harrington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

South American Explorers
South American Explorers, headquartered in Ithaca, New York, is a nonprofit travel, scientific, and educational organization founded in 1977.[1] Its goals are advancing field exploration and research in South and Central America on subjects such as biology, geography, anthropology, and archaeology, and promoting field sports such as mountaineering, rafting, and caving. The organization publishes the quarterly South American Explorer magazine, and sells maps, guidebooks, trip reports, and other materials.[2][3] There are clubhouses for member use: Lima and Cuzco in Peru; Quito, Ecuador; and Buenos Aires, Argentina.[4]Contents1 Origins 2 Lima, Peru 3 Denver, Colorado 4 Ithaca, New York 5 Clubhouses in South America 6 South American Explorer magazine 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOrigins[edit] South American Explorers was founded by journalist Donald James Montague as the South American Explorers Club in 1977
[...More...]

"South American Explorers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
[...More...]

"Harvard University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yale School Of Forestry
The Yale School of Forestry
Forestry
& Environmental Studies (F&ES) is a professional school of Yale University. It was founded to train foresters, and now trains environmental leaders through four 2-year degree programs (Master of Environmental Management, Master of Environmental Science, Master of Forestry, and Master of Forest Science) and two 10-month mid-career programs. F&ES strives to creates new knowledge that will sustain and restore the health of the biosphere and emphasizes the possibility of creating a regenerative coexistence between humans and non-human life and the rest of the natural world
[...More...]

"Yale School Of Forestry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.