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Eternity
Eternity
Eternity
in common parlance is an infinitely long period of time. In classical philosophy, however, eternity is defined as what exists outside time while sempiternity is the concept that corresponds to the colloquial definition of eternity. Eternity
Eternity
is an important concept in many religions, where the god or gods are said to endure eternally. Some, such as Aristotle, would say the same about the natural cosmos in regard to both past and future eternal duration, and like the eternal Platonic forms, immutability was considered essential.[1]Contents1 Philosophy 2 Symbolism 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPhilosophy[edit] See also: Philosophy of space and time Aristotle
Aristotle
argued that the cosmos has no beginning
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Planck Epoch
In particle physics and physical cosmology, Planck units are a set of units of measurement defined exclusively in terms of five universal physical constants, in such a manner that these five physical constants take on the numerical value of 1 when expressed in terms of these units. Originally proposed in 1899 by German physicist Max Planck, these units are also known as natural units because the origin of their definition comes only from properties of nature and not from any human construct. Planck units are only one system of several systems of natural units, but Planck units are not based on properties of any prototype object or particle (that would be arbitrarily chosen), but rather on only the properties of free space. Planck units have significance for theoretical physics since they simplify several recurring algebraic expressions of physical law by nondimensionalization
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Stanford Encyclopedia Of Philosophy
The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Philosophy
(SEP) combines an online encyclopedia of philosophy with peer reviewed publication of original papers in philosophy, freely accessible to Internet users. It is maintained by Stanford University. Each entry is written and maintained by an expert in the field, including professors from many academic institutions worldwide. Authors contributing to the encyclopedia give Stanford University
Stanford University
the permission to publish the articles, but retain the copyright to those articles.[1]Contents1 Approach and history 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksApproach and history[edit]Play media"The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Issues Faced by Academic Reference Works That May Be of Interest tons" by Edward N. Zalta. Wikimania 2015, Mexico CityAs of January 2017[update], the SEP has 1,554 published entries
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Internet Encyclopedia Of Philosophy
The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Philosophy
(IEP) is a scholarly online encyclopedia, dealing with philosophy, philosophical topics, and philosophers.[1] The IEP combines open access publication with peer reviewed publication of original papers
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Chronology Of The Universe
The chronology of the universe describes the history and future of the universe according to Big Bang
Big Bang
cosmology. The earliest stages of the universe's existence are estimated as taking place 13.8 billion years ago, with an uncertainty of around 21 million years.[1] For the purposes of this summary, it is convenient to divide the chronology of the universe since it originated, into four parts. It is generally considered meaningless or unclear whether time existed before this chronology:1. The very early universe - the first picosecond (10−12) of cosmic time
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Sempiternal (album)
Sempiternal is the fourth studio album by British rock band Bring Me the Horizon. It was released on 1 April 2013 worldwide through RCA Records, a subsidiary label of Sony Music Entertainment, and 2 April 2013 in the United States and Canada through Epitaph Records. It is the first album to feature former Worship keyboardist Jordan Fish and was believed to be the last album to feature guitarist Jona Weinhofen. However, Weinhofen's role within the album's development has been faced with controversy. Written and recorded throughout 2012, Sempiternal showed the band pool diverse influences from electronic music, ambient music and pop. "Sempiternal" is an archaic English word denoting the concept of "everlasting time" that can never actually come to pass.[5] It stems from the Latin word "sempiternus" (a concatenation of root "semper" and suffix "aeternum"). The album spawned four singles ("Shadow Moses"; "Sleepwalking"; "Go to Hell, for Heaven's Sake"; and "Can You Feel My Heart")
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Infinity
Infinity
Infinity
(symbol: ∞) is a concept describing something without any bound or larger than any natural number. Philosophers have speculated about the nature of the infinite, for example Zeno of Elea, who proposed many paradoxes involving infinity, and Eudoxus of Cnidus, who used the idea of infinitely small quantities in his method of exhaustion. Modern mathematics uses the general concept of infinity in the solution of many practical and theoretical problems, such as in calculus and set theory, and the idea is also used in physics and the other sciences. In mathematics, "infinity" is often treated as a number (i.e., it counts or measures things: "an infinite number of terms") but it is not the same sort of number as either a natural or a real number. Georg Cantor
Georg Cantor
formalized many ideas related to infinity and infinite sets during the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Tibetan Buddhism
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa
Kadampa
Buddhism Shambhala
Shambhala
BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPractices


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Boethius
Anicius Manlius Severinus Boëthius,[a] commonly called Boethius[b] (English: /boʊˈiːθiəs/; also Boetius /-ʃəs/; c. 480–524 AD), was a Roman senator, consul, magister officiorum, and philosopher of the early 6th century
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Minimum Total Potential Energy Principle
The minimum total potential energy principle is a fundamental concept used in physics and engineering. It dictates that (at low temperatures) a structure or body shall deform or displace to a position that (locally) minimizes the total potential energy, with the lost potential energy being converted into kinetic energy (specifically heat). Some examples[edit]A free proton and free electron will tend to combine to form the lowest energy state (the ground state) of a hydrogen atom, the most stable configuration. This is because that state's energy is 13.6 electron volts (eV) lower than when the two particles separated by an infinite distance. The dissipation in this system takes the form of spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation, which increases the entropy of the surroundings. A rolling ball will end up stationary at the bottom of a hill, the point of minimum potential energy
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Gradient
In mathematics, the gradient is a multi-variable generalization of the derivative. While a derivative can be defined on functions of a single variable, for functions of several variables, the gradient takes its place. The gradient is a vector-valued function, as opposed to a derivative, which is scalar-valued. Like the derivative, the gradient represents the slope of the tangent of the graph of the function. More precisely, the gradient points in the direction of the greatest rate of increase of the function, and its magnitude is the slope of the graph in that direction. The components of the gradient in coordinates are the coefficients of the variables in the equation of the tangent space to the graph
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Unmoved Mover
The unmoved mover (Ancient Greek: ὃ οὐ κινούμενον κινεῖ, translit. ho ou kinoúmenos kineî, lit. 'that which moves without being moved')[1] or prime mover (Latin: primum movens) is a concept advanced by Aristotle
Aristotle
as a primary cause or "mover" of all the motion in the universe.[2] As is implicit in the name, the "unmoved mover" moves other things, but is not itself moved by any prior action. In Book 12 (Greek: Λ) of his Metaphysics, Aristotle
Aristotle
describes the unmoved mover as being perfectly beautiful, indivisible, and contemplating only the perfect contemplation: itself contemplating. He equates this concept also with the active intellect. This Aristotelian concept had its roots in cosmological speculations of the earliest Greek pre-Socratic philosophers and became highly influential and widely drawn upon in medieval philosophy and theology. St
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Metaphysics (Aristotle)
[*]: Authenticity disputed strikethrough: Generally agreed to be spuriousv t e Metaphysics
Metaphysics
(Greek: τὰ μετὰ τὰ φυσικά; Latin: Metaphysica[1]) is one of the principal works of Aristotle
Aristotle
and the first major work of the branch of philosophy with the same name. The principal subject is "being qua being," or being insofar as it is being. It examines what can be asserted about any being insofar as it is and not because of any special qualities it has
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Platonic Realism
Platonic realism
Platonic realism
is a philosophical term usually used to refer to the idea of realism regarding the existence of universals or abstract objects after the Greek philosopher Plato
Plato
(c. 427–c. 347 BC), a student of Socrates. As universals were considered by Plato
Plato
to be ideal forms, this stance is ambiguously also called Platonic idealism. This should not be confused with idealism as presented by philosophers such as George Berkeley: as Platonic abstractions are not spatial, temporal, or mental, they are not compatible with the later idealism's emphasis on mental existence
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Hourglass
An hourglass (or sandglass, sand timer, or sand clock) is a device used to measure the passage of time. It comprises two glass bulbs connected vertically by a narrow neck that allows a regulated trickle of material (historically sand) from the upper bulb to the lower one. Factors affecting the time interval measured include sand quantity, sand coarseness, bulb size, and neck width. Hourglasses may be reused indefinitely by inverting the bulbs once the upper bulb is empty.Contents1 History1.1 Antiquity 1.2 Reappearance in the Early Middle Ages2 Design 3 Material 4 Practical uses4.1 Modern practical uses5 Symbolic uses5.1 Modern symbolic uses6 Hourglass
Hourglass
motif 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingHistory[edit] Antiquity[edit] Sarcophagus
Sarcophagus
dated c
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Allegorical
As a literary device, an allegory is a metaphor whose vehicle may be a character, place or event, representing real-world issues and occurrences
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