HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
[...More...]

"Estuary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deforestation
Deforestation, clearance, or clearing is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a non-forest use.[2] Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use. The most concentrated deforestation occurs in tropical rainforests.[3] About 30 percent of Earth's land surface is covered by forests.[4] Deforestation
Deforestation
occurs for multiple reasons: trees are cut down to be used for building or sold as fuel (sometimes in the form of charcoal or timber), while cleared land is used as pasture for livestock and plantation. The removal of trees without sufficient reforestation has resulted in habitat damage, biodiversity loss, and aridity. It has adverse impacts on biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Deforestation
Deforestation
has also been used in war to deprive the enemy of vital resources and cover for its forces
[...More...]

"Deforestation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yachats River
The Yachats River (/ˈjɑːhɑːts/ YAH-hahts) is a short river on the central Oregon coast, about 60 miles (100 km) west-north-west of Eugene. The name is the native name meaning at the foot of the mountain.[3] The river begins about 12 miles (19 km) east-south-east of Yachats, Oregon, in steep, thick forest, a half mile north of Klickitat Mountain and flows northward about three miles (5 km), joins Grass Creek then about 0.4 miles (640 m) later joins with School Fork and turns westward. Keller Creek and Stump Creek join after about a mile (1.6 km) of meandering, followed after a half mile (800 m) by Neiglick Creek at river mile 10 (river kilometer 16). The river bed widens significantly and levels out to become very slow moving and turns northward about a half mile, then westward at river mile 8 (river kilometer 13). It meanders westward the rest of the way to the ocean
[...More...]

"Yachats River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heavy Metal (chemistry)
Heavy metals
Heavy metals
are generally defined as metals with relatively high densities, atomic weights, or atomic numbers. The criteria used, and whether metalloids are included, vary depending on the author and context. In metallurgy, for example, a heavy metal may be defined on the basis of density, whereas in physics the distinguishing criterion might be atomic number, while a chemist would likely be more concerned with chemical behaviour. More specific definitions have been published, but none of these have been widely accepted. The definitions surveyed in this article encompass up to 96 out of the 118 known chemical elements; only mercury, lead and bismuth meet all of them. Despite this lack of agreement, the term (plural or singular) is widely used in science
[...More...]

"Heavy Metal (chemistry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydrocarbon
In organic chemistry, a hydrocarbon is an organic compound consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon,[1]:620 and thus are group 14 hydrides
[...More...]

"Hydrocarbon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Overfishing
Overfishing
Overfishing
is a form of overexploitation where fish stocks are reduced to below acceptable levels. Overfishing
Overfishing
can occur in water bodies of any sizes, such as ponds, rivers, lakes or oceans, and can result in resource depletion, reduced biological growth rates and low biomass levels. Sustained overfishing can lead to critical depensation, where the fish population is no longer able to sustain itself. Some forms of overfishing, for example the overfishing of sharks, has led to the upset of entire marine ecosystems.[1] The ability of a fishery to recover from overfishing depends on whether the ecosystem's conditions are suitable for the recovery. Dramatic changes in species composition can result in an ecosystem shift, where other equilibrium energy flows involve species compositions different from those that had been present before the depletion of the original fish stock
[...More...]

"Overfishing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Land Degradation
Land
Land
degradation is a process in which the value of the biophysical environment is affected by a combination of human-induced processes acting upon the land.[1] It is viewed as any change or disturbance to the land perceived to be deleterious or undesirable.[2] Natural hazards are excluded as a cause; however human activities can indirectly affect phenomena such as floods and bush fires. This is considered to be an important topic of the 21st century
[...More...]

"Land Degradation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Darwin, Northern Territory
Darwin (/ˈdɑːrwɪn/ ( listen) DAR-win)[7] is the capital city of the Northern Territory
Northern Territory
of Australia. Situated on the Timor Sea, Darwin is the largest city in the sparsely populated Northern Territory, with a population of 145,916.[1] It is the smallest and most northerly of the Australian capital cities, and acts as the Top End's regional centre. Darwin's proximity to South East Asia makes it a link between Australia
Australia
and countries such as Indonesia
Indonesia
and East Timor. The Stuart Highway begins in Darwin, ending at Port Augusta
Port Augusta
in South Australia. The city itself is built on a low bluff overlooking the harbour. Its suburbs spread out over some area, beginning at Lee Point in the north and stretching to Berrimah in the east. Past Berrimah, the Stuart Highway goes on to Darwin's satellite city, Palmerston, and its suburbs
[...More...]

"Darwin, Northern Territory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Habitat Destruction
Habitat
Habitat
destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered unable to support the species present. In this process, the organisms that previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity.[1] Habitat
Habitat
destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling and urban sprawl
[...More...]

"Habitat Destruction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holocene
The Holocene
Holocene
( /ˈhɒləˌsiːn, ˈhoʊ-/)[2][3] is the current geological epoch. It began after the Pleistocene[4], approximately 11,650 cal years before present.[5] The Holocene
Holocene
is part of the Quaternary
Quaternary
period. Its name comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
words ὅλος (holos, whole or entire) and καινός (kainos, new), meaning "entirely recent".[6] It has been identified with the current warm period, known as MIS 1, and is considered by some to be an interglacial period. The Holocene
Holocene
encompasses the growth and impacts of the human species worldwide, including all its written history, development of major civilizations, and overall significant transition toward urban living in the present
[...More...]

"Holocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sediment
Sediment
Sediment
is a naturally occurring material that is broken down by processes of weathering and erosion, and is subsequently transported by the action of wind, water, or ice, and/or by the force of gravity acting on the particles. For example, sand and silt can be carried in suspension in river water and on reaching the sea be deposited by sedimentation and if buried, may eventually become sandstone and siltstone (sedimentary rocks). Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes), but also wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition
[...More...]

"Sediment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Northern Territory
The Northern Territory
Northern Territory
(abbreviated as NT) is a federal Australian territory in the central and central northern regions of Australia. It shares borders with Western Australia
Australia
to the west (129th meridian east), South Australia
Australia
to the south (26th parallel south), and Queensland
Queensland
to the east (138th meridian east). To the north, the territory is bordered by the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea
Arafura Sea
and the Gulf of Carpentaria. Despite its large area—over 1,349,129 square kilometres (520,902 sq mi), making it the third largest Australian federal division—it is sparsely populated
[...More...]

"Northern Territory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paravur, Kollam
Paravur (Paravūr), is a town and a municipality in the Kollam district of the Indian state of Kerala.Contents1 Administration 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 History 5 Transport5.1 Road 5.2 Rail6 Industrial development 7 Notable people 8 See also 9 References 10 Climate 11 External linksAdministration[edit] Paravur Municipality consists of Kottapuram, Koonayil, Thekkumbhagam, Chillakkal, Perumpuzha, Nedungolam, Pozhikara, Maniyamkulam, Kurumandal, Kottamoola, Attinpuram & Kochalummoodu.[4] Paravur Municipality is a Grade-II Municipality of Kerala. Geography[edit] Paravur is located at 8.78 N 76 E.[5] It has an average elevation of 10 metres (32 feet). Paravur, 21 kilometers from the Kollam, is a narrow skirt of land stretching in between the backwaters and the sea
[...More...]

"Paravur, Kollam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radionuclide
A radionuclide (radioactive nuclide, radioisotope or radioactive isotope) is an atom that has excess nuclear energy, making it unstable. This excess energy can be used in one of three ways: emitted from the nucleus as gamma radiation; transferred to one of its electrons to release it as a conversion electron; or used to create and emit a new particle (alpha particle or beta particle) from the nucleus. During those processes, the radionuclide is said to undergo radioactive decay.[1] These emissions are considered ionizing radiation because they are powerful enough to liberate an electron from another atom. The radioactive decay can produce a stable nuclide or will sometimes produce a new unstable radionuclide which may undergo further decay
[...More...]

"Radionuclide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kollam
Kollam
Kollam
(IPA: [koɭɭəm]) or Quilon
Quilon
(Coulão), formerly Desinganadu, is an old seaport and city on the Laccadive Sea
Laccadive Sea
coast of the Indian state of Kerala. The city is on the banks Ashtamudi Lake.[7][8][9] Kollam
Kollam
has had a strong commercial reputation since the days of the Phoenicians
Phoenicians
and Romans.[10] Fed by the Chinese trade, it was mentioned by Ibn Battuta
Ibn Battuta
in the 14th century as one of the five Indian ports he had seen during the course of his twenty-four year travels.[11] Desinganadu's rajas exchanged embassies with Chinese rulers while there was a flourishing Chinese settlement at Kollam
[...More...]

"Kollam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polychlorinated Biphenyl
A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) is an organic chlorine compound with the formula C12H10−xClx. Polychlorinated biphenyls were once widely deployed as dielectric and coolant fluids in electrical apparatus, carbonless copy paper and in heat transfer fluids.[1] Because of their longevity, PCBs are still widely in use, even though their manufacture has declined drastically since the 1960s, when a host of problems were identified.[2] Because of PCBs' environmental toxicity and classification as a persistent organic pollutant, PCB production was banned by United States federal law in 1978 and by the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants in 2001.[3] The International Agency for Research on Cancer
International Agency for Research on Cancer
(IARC), rendered PCBs as definite carcinogens in humans. According to the U.S
[...More...]

"Polychlorinated Biphenyl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.