HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Esa-Pekka Salonen
Esa-Pekka Salonen
Esa-Pekka Salonen
( pronunciation (help·info): [ˈesɑˌpekːɑ ˈsɑlonen]; born June 30, 1958) is a Finnish orchestral conductor and composer
[...More...]

"Esa-Pekka Salonen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conducting
Conducting
Conducting
is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert
[...More...]

"Conducting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Igor Stravinsky
Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: И́горь Фёдорович Страви́нский, IPA: [ˈiɡərʲ ˈfʲɵdərəvʲɪtɕ strɐˈvʲinskʲɪj]; 17 June [O.S. 5 June] 1882 – 6 April 1971) was a Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century. Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Serge Diaghilev
Serge Diaghilev
and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird
The Firebird
(1910), Petrushka (1911), and The Rite of Spring
The Rite of Spring
(1913)
[...More...]

"Igor Stravinsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Composer
A composer ( Latin
Latin
compōnō; literally "one who puts together") is a musician who is an author of music in any form, including vocal music (for a singer or choir), instrumental music, electronic music, and music which combines multiple forms. A composer may create music in any musical music genre, including, for example, classical music, musical theatre, blues, folk music, jazz, and popular music
[...More...]

"Composer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Salzburg Festival
The Salzburg
Salzburg
Festival
Festival
(German: Salzburger Festspiele) is a prominent festival of music and drama established in 1920. It is held each summer (for five weeks starting in late July) within the Austrian town of Salzburg, the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
[...More...]

"Salzburg Festival" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Olivier Messiaen
Olivier Eugène Charles Prosper Messiaen (French: [ɔlivje mɛsjɑ̃]; December 10, 1908 – April 27, 1992) was a French composer, organist, and ornithologist, one of the major composers of the 20th century. His music is rhythmically complex; harmonically and melodically he employs a system he called modes of limited transposition, which he abstracted from the systems of material generated by his early compositions and improvisations. He wrote music for chamber ensembles and orchestra, vocal music, as well as for solo organ and piano, and also experimented with the use of novel electronic instruments developed in Europe during his lifetime. He travelled widely and wrote works inspired by diverse influences ranging from Japanese music, the landscape of Bryce Canyon in Utah
Utah
and the life of St. Francis of Assisi
[...More...]

"Olivier Messiaen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lucerne Festival
The Lucerne
Lucerne
Festival is a series of classical music festivals based in Lucerne, Switzerland.[1][2] Founded in 1938, it currently produces three festivals per year, attracting some 110,000 visitors annually[3] taking place since 2004 primarily at the Lucerne
Lucerne
Culture and Congress Centre (KKL) designed by Jean Nouvel.[4] Each festival features resident orchestras and soloists alongside guest performances from international ensembles and artists, in 2017 including the Berlin Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic, Emanuel Ax, Martha Argerich
Martha Argerich
and Maxim Vengerov. The largest festival is the Summer Festival ( Lucerne
Lucerne
Festival im Sommer), taking place in August und September and featuring over 100 events
[...More...]

"Lucerne Festival" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
[...More...]

"Switzerland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Proms
The Proms, more formally known as the Henry Wood
Henry Wood
Promenade Concerts presented by the BBC, is an eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts and other events held annually, predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
in central London, England, UK. Founded in 1895, seasons now consist of concerts in Albert Hall, chamber music concerts at Cadogan Hall, additional Proms in the Park events across the UK on the Last Night of the Proms, and associated educational and children's events. The season is a significant event in British culture. In classical music, Jiří Bělohlávek
Jiří Bělohlávek
described the Proms as "the world's largest and most democratic musical festival".[1] Prom is short for promenade concert, a term which originally referred to outdoor concerts in London's pleasure gardens, where the audience was free to stroll around while the orchestra was playing
[...More...]

"The Proms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cologne
Cologne
Cologne
(English: /kəˈloʊn/; German: Köln, pronounced [kœln] ( listen), Ripuarian: Kölle [ˈkœɫə] ( listen)) is the largest city in the German federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine-Westphalia
and the fourth most populated city in Germany
Germany
(after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich). It is located within the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
metropolitan region which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas. Cologne
Cologne
is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southwest of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Dusseldorf
Dusseldorf
and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. Cologne
Cologne
is located on both sides of the Rhine, near Germany's borders with Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
[...More...]

"Cologne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Théâtre Du Châtelet
The Théâtre du Châtelet
Théâtre du Châtelet
(French pronunciation: ​[teɑtʁ dy ʃatlɛ]) is a theatre and opera house, located in the place du Châtelet in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. One of two theatres (the other being the Théâtre de la Ville) built on the site of a châtelet, a small castle or fortress, it was designed by Gabriel Davioud
Gabriel Davioud
at the request of Baron Haussmann
Baron Haussmann
between 1860 and 1862. Originally built with 3,000 seats, it was named the Théâtre Impérial du Châtelet, but has undergone remodeling and name changes over the years. Currently it seats 2,500 people.Contents1 Origins 2 Recent history 3 References 4 External linksOrigins[edit]The theatre ca. 1875The theatre is one of two apparent twins constructed along the quays of the Seine, facing each other across the open Place du Châtelet and its ornate fountain
[...More...]

"Théâtre Du Châtelet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alex Ross (music Critic)
Alex Ross (born 1968) is an American music critic. He has been on the staff of The New Yorker
The New Yorker
magazine since 1996, and he has written the books The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century (2007) and Listen to This (2011).Contents1 Biography1.1 Journalism career 1.2 Books 1.3 Accolades2 Personal life 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Ross is a 1986 graduate of St. Albans School in Washington, D.C., having previously attended the Potomac School in McLean, Virginia. He is a 1990 graduate of Harvard University, where he studied under composer Peter Lieberson and was a DJ on the classical and underground rock departments of the college radio station, WHRB. He earned a Harvard A.B. in English summa cum laude for a thesis on James Joyce. Journalism career[edit] From 1992 to 1996 Ross was a music critic at The New York Times
[...More...]

"Alex Ross (music Critic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
(German: [ˈmaːlɐ]; 7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was an Austro-Bohemian late-Romantic composer, and one of the leading conductors of his generation. As a composer he acted as a bridge between the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 his compositions were rediscovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became one of the most frequently performed and recorded of all composers, a position he has sustained into the 21st century
[...More...]

"Gustav Mahler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The New Yorker
The New Yorker
The New Yorker
is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally
[...More...]

"The New Yorker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Richard Wagner
Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner
(/ˈvɑːɡnər/; German: [ˈʁiçaʁt ˈvaːɡnɐ] ( listen); 22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is chiefly known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas"). Unlike most opera composers, Wagner wrote both the libretto and the music for each of his stage works. Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in the romantic vein of Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
and Giacomo Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk
Gesamtkunstwerk
("total work of art"), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama. He described this vision in a series of essays published between 1849 and 1852
[...More...]

"Richard Wagner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parsifal
Parsifal
Parsifal
(WWV 111) is an opera in three acts by German composer Richard Wagner. It is loosely based on Parzival
Parzival
by Wolfram von Eschenbach, a 13th-century epic poem of the Arthurian
Arthurian
knight Parzival (Percival) and his quest for the Holy Grail
Holy Grail
(12th century). Wagner first conceived the work in April 1857 but did not finish it until twenty-five years later. It was Wagner's last completed opera and in composing it he took advantage of the particular acoustics of his Bayreuth
Bayreuth
Festspielhaus. Parsifal
Parsifal
was first produced at the second Bayreuth Festival
Bayreuth Festival
in 1882
[...More...]

"Parsifal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.