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Ernst Keil
Ernst Victor Keil (6 December 1816 – 23 March 1878) was a German bookseller, journalist, editor and publisher. His early publications promoted liberal views and satirized famous politicians leading up to the German revolutions of 1848–49, resulting in government censorship and earning him a short prison stay in 1852. He then developed Die Gartenlaube, a weekly illustrated magazine aimed at enlightening and entertaining the whole family, particularly the middle and lower classes of society. It became the first successful mass-market German language
German language
magazine.[1][2] By the time of his death in 1878, Gartenlaube had reached a paid circulation of 382,000 and an actual readership of at least 2 million, making it one of the most widely read publications in the world at the time
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Bad Langensalza
Bad Langensalza
Bad Langensalza
(until 1956: Langensalza) is a spa town of 17,500 inhabitants in the district of Unstrut-Hainich, Thuringia, Germany.Contents1 History 2 Local council 3 Main sights 4 International relations 5 People 6 References 7 External links 8 GalleryHistory[edit]Langensalza in 1750.It was first mentioned in historical records ca. 932, as a village named "Salzaha". The city name was changed to Langensalza ca. 1578, and "Bad" or "Bath" was added to the city name in 1956. In 1075, Langensalza was the site of a battle, in which Emperor Henry IV won over the rebelling Saxons
Saxons
and Thuringians. The city was plundered and damaged by fires during the Thirty Years' War (c. 1632). Fires again destroyed large parts of the city in 1711, including complete destruction of the city hall
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Hubertusburg
Hubertusburg
Hubertusburg
is a Baroque palace in Saxony, Germany. It was built from 1721 onwards at the behest of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, and after his death served as a residence of his son Augustus III. The 'Saxon Versailles' is chiefly known for the signing of the 1763 Treaty of Hubertusburg
Treaty of Hubertusburg
that ended the Seven Years' War.[1] The palace is located in the municipality of Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
near Oschatz. History[edit] Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
hunting lodgeThe extended Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
Forest had already been a hunting ground for the Wettin elector Augustus in the 16th century
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Leberecht Uhlich
Leberecht Uhlich (1799–1872) was a German clergyman and one of the founders of the German Free Congregations. Biography[edit] He studied at Halle, and served as pastor in various places till 1847, when he withdrew from the Evangelical Church, and thenceforth was preacher of the Free Congregation at Magdeburg. In 1841, he became the leader of the Friends of the Light (also called Protestant Friends). His liberal views frequently involved him in difficulties with the authorities. He published Bekenntnisse (4th ed. 1846); Christentum und Kirche (2d ed. 1846); Die Throne im Himmel und auf Erden (1845); Handbüchlein der freien Religion (7th ed. 1889). His autobiography appeared at Gera in 1872. Notes[edit]This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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Steel Engraving
Steel engraving
Steel engraving
is a technique for printing illustrations based on steel instead of copper. It has been rarely used in artistic printmaking, although it was much used for reproductions in the 19th century. Steel engraving
Steel engraving
was introduced in 1792 by Jacob Perkins (1766–1849), an American inventor, for banknote printing. When Perkins moved to London in 1818, the technique was adapted in 1820 by Charles Warren and especially by Charles Heath
Charles Heath
(1785–1848) for Thomas Campbell's Pleasures of Hope, which contained the first published plates engraved on steel. The new technique only partially replaced the other commercial techniques of that time such as woodcut, wood engraving, copper engraving and later lithography. All the illustrations in the Encyclopædia Britannica of 1911 are steel engravings.Landing of Columbus, engraved by the BEP based on Vanderlyn's 1847 painting
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Zeitz
Zeitz
Zeitz
is a town in the Burgenlandkreis
Burgenlandkreis
district, in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It is situated on the river Weiße Elster, in the triangle of the federal states Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia
Thuringia
and Saxony.Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 Sons and daughters of the town3.1 Up to 1925 3.2 After 19254 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Zeitz
Zeitz
was first recorded under the name Cici in the synode of Ravenna in 967. Between 965 and 982, it was the chief fortress of the March of Zeitz. Zeitz
Zeitz
was a bishop's residence between 968 and 1028, when it was moved to Naumburg. Beginning at the end of the 13th century, the bishops again resided in their castle at Zeitz. The Herrmannsschacht (built in 1889) is one of the oldest brick factories in the world
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Magdeburg
Magdeburg
Magdeburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈmakdəbʊɐ̯k] ( listen); Low Saxon: Meideborg, [ˈmaˑɪdebɔɐ̯x]) is the capital city and the second largest city of the state of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Magdeburg
Magdeburg
is situated on the Elbe
Elbe
River and was one of the most important medieval cities of Europe. Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
and founder of the archbishopric of Magdeburg, was buried in the town's cathedral after his death. Magdeburg's version of German town law, known as Magdeburg
Magdeburg
rights, spread throughout Central and Eastern Europe. The city is also well known for the Sack of Magdeburg, which sparked outrage across the Protestant world and became the worst massacre of the Thirty Years' War
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Halle (Saale)
Halle (Saale)[2] (German: Halle (Saale), pronounced [ˈhalə ˈzaːlə] ( listen)) is a city in the southern part of the German state Saxony-Anhalt. Halle is an economic and educational center in central-eastern Germany. The University of Halle- Wittenberg
Wittenberg
is the largest university in Saxony-Anhalt
Saxony-Anhalt
and one of the oldest universities in Germany, and a nurturing ground for the local startup ecosystem
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Dessau
Dessau
Dessau
is a town and former municipality in Germany
Germany
on the junction of the rivers Mulde
Mulde
and Elbe, in the Bundesland (Federal State) of Saxony-Anhalt. Since 1 July 2007, it has been part of the newly created municipality of Dessau-Roßlau
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Bremen
The City Municipality of Bremen (German: Stadtgemeinde Bremen, IPA: [ˈbʁeːmən] ( listen)) is a Hanseatic city in northwestern Germany, which belongs to the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen (also called just "Bremen" for short), a federal state of Germany. As a commercial and industrial city with a major port on the River Weser, Bremen is part of the Bremen/Oldenburg Metropolitan Region, with 2.4 million people. Bremen is the second most populous city in Northern Germany and eleventh in Germany.[3] Bremen is a major cultural and economic hub in the northern regions of Germany. Bremen is home to dozens of historical galleries and museums, ranging from historical sculptures to major art museums, such as the Übersee-Museum Bremen.[4] Bremen has a reputation as a working-class city.[5] Bremen is home to a large number of multinational companies and manufacturing centers
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Braunschweig
Braunschweig
Braunschweig
(German pronunciation: [ˈbʁaʊ̯nʃvaɪ̯k] ( listen); Low German: Brunswiek [ˈbrɔˑnsviːk]), also called Brunswick in English,[3] is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, north of the Harz
Harz
mountains at the furthest navigable point of the Oker
Oker
river which connects it to the North Sea via the Aller
Aller
and Weser
Weser
rivers. In 2016, it had a population of 250,704. A powerful and influential centre of commerce in medieval Germany, Braunschweig
Braunschweig
was a member of the Hanseatic League
Hanseatic League
from the 13th until the 17th century
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Dresden
Dresden
Dresden
(German pronunciation: [ˈdʁeːsdn̩] ( listen); Czech: Drážďany, Polish: Drezno) is the capital city[2] and, after Leipzig, the second-largest city[3] of the Free State of Saxony
Saxony
in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the border with the Czech Republic. Dresden
Dresden
has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor, and was once by personal union the family seat of Polish monarchs. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city centre. The controversial American and British bombing of Dresden
Dresden
in World War II
World War II
towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000 people, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city centre
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Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
is a municipality in the North Saxony
Saxony
district in Saxony, Germany. Two hunting castles of the Saxon Dukes and Kings are to be found here. Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
and its sub-districts 2011Contents1 Geography1.1 Neighboring Districts 1.2 Landscape2 Sights 3 History 4 Monuments4.1 King Albert Monument 4.2 Death March Memorial 4.3 Zeppelin
Zeppelin
Stone5 Recreational activities. 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] Neighboring Districts[edit]Places adjacent to WermsdorfSachsendorf Dahlen CavertitzNerchauOschatzMutzschen Ablaß Sornzig MügelnLandscape[edit] Wermsdorf
Wermsdorf
is situated within Wermsdorf Forest a wooded area of some 30 km/sq, less than 7.0 km to the north-west of Mügeln
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Gustav Adolf Wislicenus
Gustav Adolf Wislicenus (20 November 1803 in Battaune, Prussian Saxony – 14 October 1875 in Fluntern, part of Zurich) was a German theologian, one of the leaders of the Free Congregations.Contents1 Biography 2 Additional works by Wislicenus 3 Notes 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] He studied theology at Halle, and as member of the Burschenschaft was sentenced in 1824 to twelve years' confinement in a fortress. He was pardoned in 1829 and continued his studies in Berlin. In 1841 he became pastor at Halle, and became associated with the Friends of Light, and in consequence of a lecture delivered at Köthen in 1844, was deprived of his pastorate in 1846. He then a became a preacher of the free congregation at Halle.[1] His pamphlet "Die Bibel im Lichte der Bildung unserer Zeit" caused him to be sentenced to two years' imprisonment in 1853, and he fled to America,[2][3] lectured at first in Boston and in 1854 he established a school at Hoboken, New Jersey
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Feuilleton
Feuilleton
Feuilleton
(French pronunciation: ​[fœjtɔ̃]; a diminutive of French: feuillet, the leaf of a book) was originally a kind of supplement attached to the political portion of French newspapers, consisting chiefly of non-political news and gossip, literature and art criticism, a chronicle of the latest fashions, and epigrams, charades and other literary trifles. The term feuilleton was invented by the editors of the French Journal des débats; Julien Louis Geoffroy and Bertin the Elder, in 1800
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Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
(/ˈɡɜːrtə/;[1][2][3] German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə] ( listen); 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman. His works include four novels; epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; and treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour. In addition, there are numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him extant. A literary celebrity by the age of 25, Goethe was ennobled by the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Carl August in 1782 after taking up residence there in November 1775 following the success of his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther
Werther
(1774). He was an early participant in the Sturm und Drang literary movement
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