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Ernő Rubik
Ernő Rubik
Ernő Rubik
(Hungarian: [ˈrubik ˈɛrnøː]; born 13 July 1944) is a Hungarian inventor, architect and professor of architecture. He is best known for the invention of mechanical puzzles including Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
(1974), Rubik's Magic, Rubik's Magic: Master Edition, and Rubik's Snake.[1] While Rubik became famous for inventing the Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
and his other puzzles, much of his recent work involves the promotion of science in education
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Helicopter Cube
A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL
VTOL
(vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform. The English word helicopter is adapted from the French word hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix (ἕλιξ) "helix, spiral, whirl, convolution"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) "wing".[2][3][4][5] English language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "copter", "helo", "heli", and "whirlybird". Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight, with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61
Focke-Wulf Fw 61
being the first operational helicopter in 1936
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Jules Verne
24 March 1905(1905-03-24) (aged 77) Amiens, FranceCause of death Diabetes
Diabetes
mellitusResting place La Madeleine cemetery, Amiens, FranceOccupation Novelist, poet, playwrightNationality FrenchPeriod 1850–1905Notable worksTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Journey to the Center of the Earth From the Earth to the Moon Around the World in Eighty Days The Mysterious Island Five Weeks in a Balloon Michael Strogoff Off on a Comet Robur the Conqueror An Antarctic Mystery Master of the WorldSpouse Honorine Hebe du Fraysse de Viane (Morel) VerneChildren
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M.C. Escher
Maurits Cornelis Escher (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈmʌurɪts kɔrˈneːlɪs ˈɛsxər]; 17 June 1898 – 27 March 1972), or commonly M. C. Escher, was a Dutch graphic artist who made mathematically inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. His work features mathematical objects and operations including impossible objects, explorations of infinity, reflection, symmetry, perspective, truncated and stellated polyhedra, hyperbolic geometry, and tessellations. Although Escher believed he had no mathematical ability, he interacted with the mathematicians George Pólya, Roger Penrose, Harold Coxeter and crystallographer Friedrich Haag, and conducted his own research into tessellation. Early in his career, he drew inspiration from nature, making studies of insects, landscapes, and plants such as lichens, all of which he used as details in his artworks
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Infinity
Infinity
Infinity
(symbol: ∞) is a concept describing something without any bound or larger than any natural number. Philosophers have speculated about the nature of the infinite, for example Zeno of Elea, who proposed many paradoxes involving infinity, and Eudoxus of Cnidus, who used the idea of infinitely small quantities in his method of exhaustion. Modern mathematics uses the general concept of infinity in the solution of many practical and theoretical problems, such as in calculus and set theory, and the idea is also used in physics and the other sciences. In mathematics, "infinity" is often treated as a number (i.e., it counts or measures things: "an infinite number of terms") but it is not the same sort of number as either a natural or a real number. Georg Cantor
Georg Cantor
formalized many ideas related to infinity and infinite sets during the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Personal Name
A personal name or full name is the set of names by which an individual is known and that can be recited as a word-group, with the understanding that, taken together, they all relate to that one individual. In many cultures, the term is synonymous with the birth name or legal name of the individual. The academic study of personal names is called anthroponymy. In Western culture, nearly all individuals possess at least one given name (also known as a first name, forename, or Christian name), together with a surname (also known as a last name or family name)—respectively, the Thomas and Jefferson in Thomas Jefferson—the latter to indicate that the individual belongs to a family, a tribe, or a clan
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Stendhal
Marie-Henri Beyle (French: [bɛl]; 23 January 1783 – 23 March 1842), better known by his pen name Stendhal
Stendhal
(French: [stɛ̃dal] or [stɑ̃dal];[2] in English [ˈstɒ̃dɑːl],[3] /stɛnˈdɑːl/,[4] or /stænˈdɑːl/[5]), was a 19th-century French writer. Best known for the novels Le Rouge et le Noir (The Red and the Black, 1830) and La Chartreuse de Parme (The Charterhouse of Parma, 1839), he is highly regarded for the acute analysis of his characters' psychology and considered one of the earliest and foremost practitioners of realism.Contents1 Life 2 Pseudonyms 3 Works3.1 Novels 3.2 Novellas 3.3 Biography 3.4 Autobiography 3.5 Non-fiction4 Crystallization 5 Critical appraisal 6 Stendhal
Stendhal
syndrome 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksLife[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Thomas Mann
Paul Thomas Mann
Thomas Mann
(German: [paʊ̯l toːmas man]; 6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and the 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature laureate. His highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas are noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer. Mann was a member of the Hanseatic Mann family
Mann family
and portrayed his family and class in his first novel, Buddenbrooks. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann
Heinrich Mann
and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann
Klaus Mann
and Golo Mann, also became important German writers
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Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre
Sartre
(/ˈsɑːrtrə/;[8] French: [saʁtʁ]; 21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980) was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism. His work has also influenced sociology, critical theory, post-colonial theory, and literary studies, and continues to influence these disciplines. Sartre
Sartre
was also noted for his open relationship with prominent feminist and fellow existentialist philosopher and writer Simone de Beauvoir. Together, Sartre
Sartre
and de Beauvoir challenged the cultural and social assumptions and expectations of their upbringings, which they considered bourgeois, in both lifestyle and thought
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Attila József
Attila József
Attila József
(Hungarian: [ˈɒtillɒ ˈjoːʒɛf]; 11 April 1905 – 3 December 1937) was a Hungarian poet of the 20th century.Contents1 Biography 2 Poetry2.1 Publications2.1.1 Original works 2.1.2 Published posthumously 2.1.3 English translations3 Tributes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit]Well, in the end I have found my home, the land where flawless chiselled letters guard my name above the grave where I'm buried, if I have buriers.Ime, hát megleltem hazámat (first stanza), translated by Edwin Morgan , Attila JózsefThe son of Áron József - a soap factory worker of Székely and Romanian origin from Banat
Banat
- and a Hungarian peasant girl with Cuman ancestry - Borbála Pőcze - was born in Ferencváros, a poor district of Budapest.[1] He had two elder sisters: Eta and Jolán
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Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
(/ˈæzɪmɒv/;[b][c] c. January 2, 1920[a] – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston
Boston
University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards.[d] His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.[1] Asimov wrote hard science fiction. Along with Robert A. Heinlein
Robert A. Heinlein
and Arthur C. Clarke, Asimov was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime.[2] Asimov's most famous work is the "Foundation" series;[3] his other major series are the "Galactic Empire" series and the Robot
Robot
series
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Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko ˌbwɔnarˈrɔːti siˈmoːni]; 6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564) was an I
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Frank Lloyd Wright
Frank Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
(born Frank Lincoln Wright, June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures, 532 of which were completed. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by Fallingwater
Fallingwater
(1935), which has been called "the best all-time work of American architecture".[1] His creative period spanned more than 70 years. Wright was the pioneer of what came to be called the Prairie School movement of architecture and he also developed the concept of the Usonian home in Broadacre City, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States. In addition to his houses, Wright designed original and innovative offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels, museums and other structures
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Le Corbusier
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
(French: [lə kɔʁbyˈzje]; 6 October 1887 – 27 August 1965), was a Swiss-French architect, designer, painter, urban planner, writer, and one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture. He was born in Switzerland
Switzerland
and became a French citizen in 1930. His career spanned five decades and he designed buildings in Europe, Japan, India, and North and South America. Dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities, Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
was influential in urban planning, and was a founding member of the Congrès International d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM)
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Lake Balaton
Lake Balaton
Lake Balaton
(German: Plattensee Slovak: Blatenské jazero) is a freshwater lake in the Transdanubian region of Hungary. It is the largest lake in Central Europe,[2] and one of the region's foremost tourist destinations. The Zala River
Zala River
provides the largest inflow of water to the lake, and the canalised Sió is the only outflow. The mountainous region of the northern shore is known both for its historic character and as a major wine region, while the flat southern shore is known for its resort towns
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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