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Epistle To The Hebrews
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Hebrews, or Letter to the Hebrews, or in the Greek manuscripts, simply To the Hebrews ( Πρὸς Έβραίους)[1] is one of the books of the New Testament. The text is traditionally attributed to Paul the Apostle, but doubt on Pauline authorship is reported by Eusebius,[2] and modern biblical scholarship considers its authorship unknown,[3] perhaps written in deliberate imitation of the style of Paul.[4][5] Scholars of Greek consider its writing to be more polished and eloquent than any other book of the New Testament. The book has earned the reputation of being a masterpiece.[6] It has also been described as an intricate New Testament
New Testament
book.[7] Scholars believe it was written for Jewish Christians
Jewish Christians
who lived in Jerusalem.[6] Its purpose was to exhort Christians
Christians
to persevere in the face of persecution
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Second Temple Judaism
Second Temple
Second Temple
Judaism
Judaism
is Judaism
Judaism
between the construction of the Second Temple
Second Temple
in Jerusalem, c. 515 BCE, and its destruction by the Romans in 70 CE
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Christology
Christology
Christology
(from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology
Christian theology
which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.[2][3][4] Primary considerations include the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
in conjunction with His relationship with that of God the Father. As such, Christology
Christology
is concerned with the details of Jesus' ministry, his acts and teachings, to arrive at a clearer understanding of who he is in his person, and his role in salvation.[5] The views of Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
provided a major component of the Christology
Christology
of the Apostolic Age
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Son Of God
Historically, many rulers have assumed titles such as son of God, son of a god or son of heaven.[1] The term "son of God" is sometimes used in the Old and New Testaments of the Christian Bible
Christian Bible
to refer to those with special relationships with God. In the Old Testament, angels, just and pious men, and the kings of Israel are all called "sons of God."[2] In the New Testament, Adam,[3] and, most notably, Jesus
Jesus
Christ[2] are called "son of God," while followers of Jesus
Jesus
are called, "sons of God."[4] In the New Testament, "Son of God" is applied to Jesus
Jesus
on many occasions.[2] Jesus
Jesus
is declared to be the Son of God
God
on two separate occasions by a voice speaking from Heaven
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Mediator (Christ As Mediator)
The Kingly office of Christ
Christ
is one of the Threefold Offices, or special relations, in which Christ
Christ
stands to his people. Christ's office as mediator of the New Covenant[2] comprehends three different functions, viz., those of a prophet, priest, and king. These are not three distinct offices, but three functions of the one office of mediator.[citation needed] Christ
Christ
is King and sovereign Head over his Church and over all things to his Church (Ephesians 1:22; 4:15; Colossians 1:18; 2:19)
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Jewish Christians
Jewish
Jewish
Christians, also Hebrew Christians
Christians
or Judeo-Christians, were the original members of the Jewish
Jewish
movement that later became Christianity.[1] In the earliest stage the community was made up of all those Jews
Jews
who accepted Jesus
Jesus
as a venerable person or the Messiah (Christ)
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Eusebius
Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea (/juːˈsiːbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius
Eusebius
Pamphili (from the Greek: Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima
Caesarea Maritima
about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon
Biblical canon
and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time.[1] He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text
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Apocalypse
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Apocalypse
Apocalypse
depicted in Christian Orthodox traditional fresco scenes in Osogovo Monastery, Republic of MacedoniaSt. John at Patmos: the receiving of an apocalyptic visionAn apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering"[1]) is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation
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Coptic Apocalypse Of Paul
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism HinduismGnostic sectsList of Gnostic sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianismSamaritan Baptist sectsDositheos Simon Magus
Simon Magus
(Simonians) Menander Basilides
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High Priest
The term "high priest" (or, less frequently, high priestess) usually refers either to an individual who holds the office of ruler-priest, or to one who is the head of a religious caste.Contents1 Ancient Egypt 2 Ancient Israel 3 Ancient World 4 India 5 Christianity 6 Other religions 7 Non-religious usages 8 ReferencesAncient Egypt[edit] Pinudjem II
Pinudjem II
as Theban High Priest
Priest
of Amun. From his Book of the Dead.In ancient Egypt, a high priest was the chief priest of any of the many gods revered by the Egyptians. High Priests of Amun
High Priests of Amun
The main cult of Amun was in Thebes. Theban High Priests of Amun
Theban High Priests of Amun
While not regarded as a dynasty, the High Priests of Amun at Thebes were nevertheless of such power and influence that they were effectively the rulers of Upper Egypt from 1080 to c
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Epistle
An epistle (/ɪˈpɪsəl/; Greek ἐπιστολή, epistolē, "letter") is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of people, usually an elegant and formal didactic letter. The epistle genre of letter-writing was common in ancient Egypt as part of the scribal-school writing curriculum. The letters in the New Testament from Apostles to Christians are usually referred to as epistles
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
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Apostle (Christian)
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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Prayer Of The Apostle Paul
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism Hinduism Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsList of Gnostic
Gnos

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Acts Of Peter And Paul
The Acts of Peter
Acts of Peter
and Paul is a late text from the New Testament apocrypha, thought to date from after the 4th century. An alternate version exists, known as the Passion of Peter and Paul, with variances in the introductory part of the text. Synopsis[edit] The text is framed as the tale of Paul's journey from the island of Gaudomeleta to Rome. It assigns Peter as Paul's brother. It also describes the death of Paul by beheading, an early church tradition. The text also contains a letter purporting to be from Pilate, known as Acts of Pilate. Origins[edit] The work appears to have been based on the Acts of Peter, with the addition of Paul's presence where before it was only Peter's. References[edit]Translation of the Acts of Peter
Acts of Peter
and Paul at the New Advent websiteThis article about a book related to Christianity
Christianity
is a stub
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Acts Of Paul And Thecla
The Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul
and Thecla
Thecla
(Acta Pauli et Theclae) is an apocryphal story– Edgar J. Goodspeed called it a "religious romance"[1]–of Paul the apostle's influence on a young virgin named Thecla. It is one of the writings of the New Testament
New Testament
apocrypha.Contents1 History of the text 2 Narrative of the text 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksHistory of the text[edit] It is attested no later than Tertullian, De baptismo 17:5 (c 190), who says that a presbyter from Asia wrote the History of Paul and Thecla, and was deposed by John the Apostle
John the Apostle
after confessing that he wrote it.[2] Tertullian
Tertullian
inveighed against its use in the advocacy of a woman's right to preach and to baptize
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