HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Epicureanism
Epicureanism
Epicureanism
is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus, founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. His materialism led him to a general attack on superstition and divine intervention. Following Aristippus—about whom very little is known— Epicurus
Epicurus
believed that what he called "pleasure" was the greatest good, but that the way to attain such pleasure was to live modestly, to gain knowledge of the workings of the world, and to limit one's desires. This would lead one to attain a state of tranquility (ataraxia) and freedom from fear as well as an absence of bodily pain (aponia). The combination of these two states constitutes happiness in its highest form
[...More...]

"Epicureanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lactantius
Lucius Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius
Lactantius
(c. 250 – c. 325) was an early Christian author who became an advisor to the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine I, guiding his religious policy as it developed,[1] and a tutor to his son. His most important work is the Institutiones Divinae
Institutiones Divinae
("The Divine Institutes"), an apologetic treatise intended to establish the reasonableness and truth of Christianity
Christianity
to pagan critics.Contents1 Biography 2 Writing 3 Prophetic exegesis 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksBiography[edit] Lactantius, a Latin-speaking North African of Berber origin,[2][3][4][5] was not born into a Christian family. He was a pupil of Arnobius
Arnobius
who taught at Sicca Veneria, an important city in Numidia
[...More...]

"Lactantius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lesbos
Lesbos
Lesbos
(/ˈlɛzbɒs/, US: /ˈlɛzboʊs/; Greek: Λέσβος Lesvos, pronounced [ˈlezvos]), sometimes referred to as Mytilene
Mytilene
after its capital, is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. It has an area of 1,633 km2 (631 sq mi)[1] with 320 kilometres (199 miles) of coastline, making it the third largest island in Greece. It is separated from Turkey
Turkey
by the narrow Mytilini Strait and in late Palaeolithic/Mesolithic times[2] was joined to the Anatolian mainland before the end of the last glacial period. Lesbos
Lesbos
is also the name of a regional unit of the North Aegean
North Aegean
region, within which Lesbos
Lesbos
island is one of five governing islands. The others are Chios, Ikaria, Lemnos, and Samos
[...More...]

"Lesbos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Age Of Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
(also known as the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
or the Age of Reason;[1] in French: le Siècle des Lumières, lit. '"the Century of Lights"'; and in German: Aufklärung, "Enlightenment")[2] was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".[3] The Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
included a range of ideas centered on reason as the primary source of authority and legitimacy and came to advance ideals like liberty, progress, tolerance, fraternity, constitutional government and separation of church and state.[4][5] In France, the central doctrines of the Enlightenment philosophers were individual liberty and religious tolerance, in opposition to an absolute monarchy and the fixed dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church
[...More...]

"Age Of Enlightenment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lampsacus
Lampsacus
Lampsacus
(/ˈlæmsəkəs/; Ancient Greek: Λάμψακος, translit. Lampsakos) was an ancient Greek city strategically located on the eastern side of the Hellespont
Hellespont
in the northern Troad.[1] An inhabitant of Lampsacus
Lampsacus
was called a Lampsacene. The name has been transmitted in the nearby modern town of Lapseki.Contents1 Ancient history 2 Christian history 3 See also 4 NotesAncient history[edit] Originally known as Pityusa or Pityussa[2] (Ancient Greek: Πιτυούσ(σ)α), it was colonized from Phocaea
Phocaea
and Miletus
[...More...]

"Lampsacus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ercolano
Ercolano
Ercolano
[erkoˈlaːno] is a town and comune in the Metropolitan City of Naples, Campania
Campania
of Southern Italy. It lies at the western foot of Mount Vesuvius, on the Bay of Naples, just southeast of the city of Naples. The medieval town of Resina - read Resìna - was built on the volcanic material left by the eruption of Vesuvius
Vesuvius
(79 CE) that destroyed the ancient city of Herculaneum, from which the present name is derived. Ercolano
Ercolano
is a resort and the starting point for excursions to the excavations of Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and for the ascent of Vesuvius
Vesuvius
by bus
[...More...]

"Ercolano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhodes
Rhodes
Rhodes
(Greek: Ρόδος, Ródos [ˈroðos]) is the largest of the Dodecanese
Dodecanese
islands of Greece
Greece
in terms of land area and also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Rhodes
Rhodes
regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean
South Aegean
administrative region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Rhodes.[1] The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011
[...More...]

"Rhodes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
[...More...]

"Alexandria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antioch
Antioch
Antioch
on the Orontes (/ˈæntiˌɒk/; Greek: Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου, also Syrian Antioch)[note 1] was an ancient Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
city[1] on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name. Antioch
Antioch
was founded near the end of the 4th century
4th century
BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Persian Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria
Alexandria
as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple
Second Temple
period
[...More...]

"Antioch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
[...More...]

"Athens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
/vɛdʒɪˈtɛəriənɪzəm/ is the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal), and may also include abstention from by-products of animal slaughter.[1][2][3][4] Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
may be adopted for various reasons. Many people object to eating meat out of respect for sentient life. Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, as well as animal rights advocacy. Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference. There are variations of the diet as well: an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet includes both eggs and dairy products, an ovo-vegetarian diet includes eggs but not dairy products, and a lacto-vegetarian diet includes dairy products but not eggs
[...More...]

"Vegetarianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Colloquially
Everyday language, everyday speech, common parlance, informal language, colloquial language, general parlance, or vernacular (but this has other meanings too), is the most used variety of a language, which is usually employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations. An example of such language is called a colloquialism, or casualism. The most common term used by dictionaries to label such an expression is colloquial. Many people however misunderstand this label and confuse it with the word local because it sounds somewhat similar[citation needed] and because informal expressions are often only used in certain regions. (But a regionalism is not the same thing as a colloquialism, and a regionalism can be local formal speech). Much of the misunderstanding is ironically caused by the dictionary label itself being formal and not part of everyday speech
[...More...]

"Colloquially" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Herculaneum
Located in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, Herculaneum
Herculaneum
(Italian: Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 AD. Its ruins are located in the comune of Ercolano, Campania, Italy. As a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site, it is famous as one of the few ancient cities that can now be seen in much of its original splendour, as well as for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae, Oplontis and Boscoreale, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
in AD 79 that buried it. Unlike Pompeii, the deep pyroclastic material which covered it preserved wooden and other organic-based objects such as roofs, beds, doors, food and even some 300 skeletons which were discovered in recent years along the seashore
[...More...]

"Herculaneum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero[n 1] (/ˈsɪsəroʊ/; Classical Latin: [ˈmaːr.kʊs ˈtʊl.lɪ.ʊs ˈkɪ.kɛ.roː]; 3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman politician and lawyer, who served as consul in the year 63 BC. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.[2][3] His influence on the Latin
Latin
language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, not only in
[...More...]

"Cicero" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oenoanda
Oenoanda
Oenoanda
or Oinoanda (Greek: τὰ Οἰνόανδα) was an ancient Greek city in Lycia, in the upper valley of the River Xanthus. It is noted for the philosophical inscription by the Epicurean, Diogenes of Oenoanda. The ruins of the city lie west of the modern village İncealiler in the Fethiye
Fethiye
district of Muğla Province, Turkey, which partly overlies the ancient site. History[edit] The early history of the settlement is obscure, in spite of an exploratory survey carried out, with permission of the Turkish authorities, by the British Institute at Ankara (BIAA) in 1974–76.[1] It seems that Oinoanda became a colony of Termessos about 200-190 BC and was also called Termessos
Termessos
Minor [2](or Termessos i pros Oinoanda)
[...More...]

"Oenoanda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.