HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Environment Canada
Environment and Climate
Climate
Change Canada
Canada
(or simply its former name, Environment Canada, or EC) (French: Environnement et Changement climatique Canada), legally incorporated as the Department of the Environment under the Department of the Environment Act (R.S., 1985, c. E-10 ), is the department of the Government of Canada
Government of Canada
with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and renewable resources
[...More...]

"Environment Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ministry (government Department)
A ministry is a governmental organisation, headed by a minister, that is meant to manage a specific sector of public administration.[1] Ministries have a bureaucratic structure.[1] Different states have different numbers and names of ministries,[1] but the Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
notes that all states have (often under different names) a Ministry of Interior, a Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a
[...More...]

"Ministry (government Department)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Environmental Monitoring
Environmental monitoring
Environmental monitoring
describes the processes and activities that need to take place to characterise and monitor the quality of the environment. Environmental monitoring
Environmental monitoring
is used in the preparation of environmental impact assessments, as well as in many circumstances in which human activities carry a risk of harmful effects on the natural environment. All monitoring strategies and programmes have reasons and justifications which are often designed to establish the current status of an environment or to establish trends in environmental parameters. In all cases the results of monitoring will be reviewed, analysed statistically and published
[...More...]

"Environmental Monitoring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

De Havilland Canada Dash 7
The de Havilland Canada
Canada
DHC-7, popularly known as the Dash 7, is a turboprop-powered regional airliner with short take-off and landing (STOL) performance. It first flew in 1975 and remained in production until 1988 when the parent company, de Havilland Canada, was purchased by Boeing
Boeing
and was later sold to Bombardier
[...More...]

"De Havilland Canada Dash 7" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carp Airport
Ottawa/ Carp Airport
Carp Airport
or Carp Airport, (ICAO: CYRP), is located 1.2 nautical miles (2.2 km; 1.4 mi) south of Carp, Ontario, Canada, a small village that is now part of Ottawa
[...More...]

"Carp Airport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Capital Region (Canada)
The National Capital Region (French: Région de la capitale nationale), also referred to as Canada's Capital Region and Ottawa– Gatineau
Gatineau
(formerly Ottawa–Hull), is an official federal designation for the Canadian capital of Ottawa, Ontario, the neighbouring city of Gatineau, Quebec, and surrounding urban and rural communities.[5] The term National Capital Region is often used to describe the Ottawa– Gatineau
Gatineau
metropolitan area, although the official boundaries of the NCR do not precisely correspond to the statistical metropolitan area. Unlike capital districts in some other federal countries, such as the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
in the United States
United States
or the Australian Capital Territory in Australia, the National Capital Region is not a separate political or administrative entity
[...More...]

"National Capital Region (Canada)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atlantic Canada
Atlantic Canada
Canada
is the region of Canada
Canada
comprising the four provinces located on the Atlantic coast, excluding Quebec: the three Maritime provinces – New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
– and the easternmost province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The population of the four Atlantic provinces in 2016 was about 2,300,000[1] on half a million km2. The provinces combined had an approximate GDP of $110.308 billion[2] in 2011.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The first Premier of Newfoundland, Joey Smallwood, coined the term "Atlantic Canada" when Newfoundland joined the Dominion of Canada
Canada
in 1949
[...More...]

"Atlantic Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Government Of Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government
Government
Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government
[...More...]

"Government Of Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Climate
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal)
[...More...]

"Climate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Governor-in-Council
The King-in-Council or Queen-in-Council, depending on the gender of the reigning monarch, is a constitutional term in a number of states. In a general sense, it would mean the monarch exercising executive authority, usually in the form of approving orders, in the presence of the country's executive council.Contents1 Norway 2 Sweden 3 The Commonwealth 4 See also4.1 Norway 4.2 Sweden 4.3 The Commonwealth5 FootnotesNorway[edit] Main article: Council of State (Norway) In Norway, the "King in Council" (Norwegian: Kongen i statsråd) refers to the meetings of the King and the Council of State (the Cabinet), where matters of importance and major decisions are made. The council meets at the Royal Palace and is normally held every Friday. It is chaired by the King or, if he is ill or abroad, the Crown Prince. In Norway's Constitution, references to the King, when formulated as King in Council (Kongen i Statsråd) refers to the formal Government of Norway
[...More...]

"Governor-in-Council" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Benzene
Benzene
Benzene
is an important organic chemical compound with the chemical formula C6H6. The benzene molecule is composed of six carbon atoms joined in a ring with one hydrogen atom attached to each. As it contains only carbon and hydrogen atoms, benzene is classed as a hydrocarbon. Benzene
Benzene
is a natural constituent of crude oil and is one of the elementary petrochemicals. Due to the cyclic continuous pi bond between the carbon atoms, benzene is classed as an aromatic hydrocarbon, the second [n]-annulene ([6]-annulene). It is sometimes abbreviated Ph–H. Benzene
Benzene
is a colorless and highly flammable liquid with a sweet smell, and is responsible for the aroma around petrol stations. It is used primarily as a precursor to the manufacture of chemicals with more complex structure, such as ethylbenzene and cumene, of which billions of kilograms are produced
[...More...]

"Benzene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peace Officer
A law enforcement officer (LEO)[1] or peace officer, in North American English, is a public-sector employee whose duties primarily involve the enforcement of laws. The phrase can include police officers, municipal law enforcement officers, special police officers, customs officers, state troopers, special agents, special investigators, border patrol officers, immigration officers, court officers, probation officers, parole officers, arson investigators, auxiliary officers, game wardens, sheriffs, constables, corrections, marshals, deputies, and Public Safety Officers (at public institutions). Security guards
Security guards
are civilians and therefore not law enforcement officers, unless they have been granted powers to enforce particular laws, such as those accredited under a Community Safety Accreditation Scheme
[...More...]

"Peace Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baton (law Enforcement)
A baton or truncheon is a roughly cylindrical club made of wood, rubber, plastic or metal. It is carried as a compliance tool and defensive weapon[1] by law-enforcement officers, correctional staff, security guards and military personnel. In many cultures, they are highly symbolic of law enforcement and are rarely used with the intention to kill. A truncheon or baton may be used in many ways as a weapon. It can be used defensively to block; offensively to strike, jab, or bludgeon; and it can aid in the application of armlocks. The usual striking or bludgeoning action is not produced by a simple and direct hit, as with an ordinary blunt object, but rather by bringing the arm down sharply while allowing the truncheon to pivot nearly freely forward and downward, so moving its tip much faster than its handle
[...More...]

"Baton (law Enforcement)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Firearm
A firearm is a portable gun (a barreled ranged weapon) that inflicts damage on targets by launching one or more projectiles driven by rapidly expanding high-pressure gas produced by exothermic combustion (deflagration) of propellant within an ammunition cartridge.[1][2][3] If gas pressurization is not achieved via propellant combustion but through mechanical gas compression, then the gun is technically an air gun, not a firearm.[4] The first primitive firearms originated in 10th-century China when bamboo tubes containing gunpowder and pellet projectiles were mounted on spears into the one-person-portable fire lance,[5], which was later used as a shock weapon to good effect in the Siege of De'an. In 13th century, the Chinese invented the metal-barrelled hand cannon, widely considered to be the true ancestor of all firearms. The technology gradually spread through the rest of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe
[...More...]

"Firearm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP; French: Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC), "Royal Gendarmerie of Canada"; colloquially known as the Mounties, and internally as "the Force") is the federal and national police force of Canada. The RCMP provides law enforcement at the federal level. It also provides provincial policing in eight of Canada's provinces (Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Saskatchewan) and local policing on contract basis in the three territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon) and more than 150 municipalities, 600 aboriginal communities, and three international airports
[...More...]

"Royal Canadian Mounted Police" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

House Of Commons Of Canada
Her Majesty's Government     Liberal Party (183)Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition     Conservative Party (97)Other parties:Parties with official status     New Democratic Party
New Democratic Party
(44)Parties without official status     Quebec
[...More...]

"House Of Commons Of Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.