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Entertainment Weekly
Entertainment
Entertainment
Weekly (sometimes abbreviated as EW) is an American magazine, published by Meredith Corporation, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books and popular culture. Different from celebrity-focused publications like Us Weekly, People (a sister magazine to EW), and In Touch Weekly, EW primarily concentrates on entertainment media news and critical reviews. However, unlike Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, which are aimed at industry insiders, EW targets a more general audience.Contents1 History 2 Typical content and frequency2.1 Layout2.1.1 News and notes 2.1.2 Feature articles 2.1.3 Reviews 2.1.4 The Bullseye2.2 Specialty issues3 Thousandth issue and redesign 4 Website 5 Poppy Awards 6 Notable former contributors 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The first issue was published on February 16, 1990,[3][4] and featured singer k.d. lang on its cover
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K.d. Lang
Kathryn Dawn Lang, OC (born November 2, 1961), known by her stage name k.d. lang, is a Canadian pop and country singer-songwriter and occasional actress. Lang has won both Juno Awards
Juno Awards
and Grammy Awards
Grammy Awards
for her musical performances; hits include "Constant Craving" and "Miss Chatelaine". She has contributed songs to movie soundtracks and has collaborated with musicians such as Roy Orbison, Tony Bennett, Elton John, Anne Murray, Ann Wilson, and Jane Siberry.[1] Lang is also known for being an animal rights, gay rights, and Tibetan human rights activist. She is a tantric practitioner of the old school of Tibetan Buddhism.[2] She performed Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" live at the opening ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics
2010 Winter Olympics
in Vancouver, British Columbia
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Letter To The Editor
A letter to the editor[1] (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern from its readers. Usually, letters are intended for publication. In many publications, letters to the editor may be sent either through conventional mail or electronic mail. Letters to the editor are most frequently associated with newspapers and newsmagazines. However, they are sometimes published in other periodicals (such as entertainment and technical magazines), and radio and television stations. In the latter instance, letters are sometimes read on the air (usually, on a news broadcast or on talk radio). In that presentation form, it can also be described as viewer mail or listener mail, depending on the medium. In academic publishing, letters to the editor of an academic journal are usually open postpublication reviews of a paper, often critical of some aspect of the original paper
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Entertainment
Entertainment
Entertainment
is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention.[1] Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens
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Fashion
Fashion
Fashion
is a popular style, especially in clothing, footwear, lifestyle products, accessories, makeup, hairstyle and body. Fashion is a distinctive and often constant trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of designers, technologists, engineers, and design managers.[1] Because the more technical term costume is regularly linked to the term "fashion", the use of the former has been relegated to special senses like fancy dress or masquerade wear, while "fashion" generally means clothing, including the study of it
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Photographs
A photograph or photo is an image created by light falling on a light-sensitive surface, usually photographic film or an electronic medium such as a CCD or a CMOS chip. Most photographs are created using a camera, which uses a lens to focus the scene's visible wavelengths of light into a reproduction of what the human eye would see. The process and practice of creating photographs is called photography
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Obituary
An obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a person, typically along with an account of the person's life and information about the upcoming funeral.[1] In large cities and larger newspapers, obituaries are written only for people considered significant.[1] In local newspapers, an obituary may be published for any local resident upon death. A necrology is a register or list of records of the deaths of people related to a particular organization, group or field, which may only contain the sparsest details, or small obituaries. Historical necrologies can be important sources of information. Two types of paid advertisements are related to obituaries. One, known as a death notice, omits most biographical details and may be a legally required public notice under some circumstances
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Premiere Magazine
Premiere was an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., between 1987 and 2010. The original version of the magazine, Première, was established in France in 1976 and is still being published there.Contents1 History 2 Regular features 3 Annual features 4 Editor 5 Cancellation 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The magazine originally had offices in Los Angeles and New York and was published by Rupert Murdoch. The founding editor was Susan Lyne and many notable people worked under her, including Peter Biskind who spent a decade at the magazine as executive editor and went on to write the bestselling book, Easy Riders, Raging Bulls
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Interview
An interview is a conversation where questions are asked and answers are given.[1] In common parlance, the word "interview" refers to a one-on-one conversation with one person acting in the role of the interviewer and the other in the role of the interviewee. The interviewer asks questions, the interviewee responds, with participants taking turns talking. Interviews usually involve a transfer of information from interviewee to interviewer, which is usually the primary purpose of the interview, although information transfers can happen in both directions simultaneously
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Independent Film
An independent film, independent movie, indie film or indie movie is a feature film that is produced outside the major film studio system, in addition to being produced and distributed by independent entertainment companies. Independent films are sometimes distinguishable by their content and style and the way in which the filmmakers' personal artistic vision is realized. Usually, but not always, independent films are made with considerably lower budgets than major studio films.[1][2] Generally, the marketing of independent films is characterized by limited release, but can also have major marketing campaigns and a wide release. Independent films are often screened at local, national, or international film festivals before distribution (theatrical or retail release)
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American Society Of Magazine Editors
The American Society of Magazine
Magazine
Editors (ASME) is an industry trade group for magazine journalists and editors of magazines published in the United States. ASME includes the editorial leaders of most major consumer magazine in print and digital extensions. The group advocates on behalf of member organizations with respect to First Amendment issues and serves as a networking hub for editors and other industry employees.[1]Contents1 History 2 ASME programs 3 Membership 4 Administration4.1 Board of Directors 2015-20165 Founders5.1 Executive officers 5.2 Executive Committee members6 Former Executives6.1 Presidents7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The ASME started as an outgrowth of the editorial committee of the Magazine
Magazine
Publishers of America in 1963
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Foreign Film
World cinema
World cinema
is not the sum-total of all films made around the world. Its use is analogous to the use of the term "world literature". Goethe [1] used the concept of Weltliteratur (world literature) in several of his essays in the early decades of the nineteenth century to describe the international circulation and reception of literary works in Europe, including works of non-Western origin. An interest in "world cinema" suggests an awareness of high-quality films made outside the Hollywood studio system which dominates international viewership. However, some people use the term to refer to the film and film industries of non-English-speaking countries in English-speaking countries
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Film Criticism
Film
Film
criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. The concept is often used interchangeably with that of the film reviews. A film review implies a recommendation aimed at consumers, however not all film criticism takes the form of reviews. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories: journalistic criticism which appears regularly in newspapers, magazines and other popular mass-media outlets; and academic criticism by film scholars who are informed by film theory and are published in academic journals
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The Boston Globe
The Boston
Boston
Globe (sometimes abbreviated as The Globe) is an American daily newspaper founded and based in Boston, Massachusetts, since its creation by Charles H. Taylor in 1872. The newspaper has won a total of 26 Pulitzer Prizes as of 2016, and with a total paid circulation of 245,824 from September 2015 to August 2016,[3] it is the 25th most read newspaper in the United States. The Boston
Boston
Globe is the oldest and largest daily newspaper in Boston.[4] Founded in the later 19th century, the paper was mainly controlled by Irish Catholic
Irish Catholic
interests before being sold to Charles H. Taylor and his family. After being privately held until 1973, it was sold to The New York Times in 1993 for $1.1 billion, making it one of the most expensive print purchases in U.S
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Chicago Sun-Times
The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is the flagship paper of the Sun-Times Media Group.Contents1 History1.1 The 1940s, 1950s and 1960s 1.2 The 1970s 1.3 The 1980s 1.4 The 1990s 1.5 The 2000s 1.6 The 2010s2 Awards and notable stories 3 Staff 4 Early Edition 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the city. It began in 1844 as the Chicago
Chicago
Daily Journal,[5] which was the first newspaper to publish the rumor, now believed false, that a cow owned by Catherine O'Leary
Catherine O'Leary
was responsible for the Chicago
Chicago
fire.[6] The Evening Journal, whose West Side building at 17-19 S
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