HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Engineering Tolerance
ENGINEERING TOLERANCE is the permissible limit or limits of variation in: * a physical dimension ; * a measured value or physical property of a material, manufactured object, system, or service; * other measured values (such as temperature, humidity, etc.); * in engineering and safety , a physical distance or space (tolerance), as in a truck (lorry), train or boat under a bridge as well as a train in a tunnel (see structure gauge and loading gauge ); * in mechanical engineering the space between a bolt and a nut or a hole, etc..Dimensions, properties, or conditions may have some variation without significantly affecting functioning of systems, machines, structures, etc. A variation beyond the tolerance (for example, a temperature that is too hot or too cold) is said to be noncompliant, rejected, or exceeding the tolerance
[...More...]

"Engineering Tolerance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IT Grade
IT GRADE refers to the International Tolerance Grade of an industrial process defined in ISO 286. This grade identifies what tolerances a given process can produce for a given dimension. The specific tolerance for a particular IT grade is calculated via the following formula: T = 10 0.2 ( I T G 1 ) ( 0.45 D 3 + 0.001 D ) {displaystyle T=10^{0.2times (ITG-1)}cdot (0.45times {sqrt{D}}+0.001times D)} where: * T is the tolerance in micrometres * D is the geometric mean dimension in millimeters * ITG is the IT Grade, a positive integer.One thinks of D {displaystyle D} as being the key dimension on the part and T {displaystyle T} as being the required tolerance on that key dimension. The larger the ITG, the looser the tolerance
[...More...]

"IT Grade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Statistical Interference
When two probability distributions overlap, STATISTICAL INTERFERENCE exists. Knowledge of the distributions can be used to determine the likelihood that one parameter exceeds another, and by how much. This technique can be used for dimensioning of mechanical parts, determining when an applied load exceeds the strength of a structure, and in many other situations. This type of analysis can also be used to estimate the probability of failure or the frequency of failure. CONTENTS * 1 Dimensional interference * 2 Physical property interference * 3 See also * 4 References DIMENSIONAL INTERFERENCE Interference of measurement distributions to determine fit of parts Mechanical parts are usually designed to fit precisely together. For example, if a shaft is designed to have a "sliding fit" in a hole, the shaft must be a little smaller than the hole
[...More...]

"Statistical Interference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ohm (unit)
The OHM (symbol: Ω ) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of electrical resistance , named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm
Georg Simon Ohm
. Although several empirically derived standard units for expressing electrical resistance were developed in connection with early telegraphy practice, the British Association for the Advancement of Science proposed a unit derived from existing units of mass, length and time and of a convenient size for practical work as early as 1861. The definition of the ohm was revised several times. Today the definition of the ohm is expressed from the quantum Hall effect
[...More...]

"Ohm (unit)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capacitor
A CAPACITOR is a passive two-terminal electrical component that stores electrical energy in an electric field . The effect of a capacitor is known as capacitance . While capacitance exists between any two electrical conductors of a circuit in sufficiently close proximity, a capacitor is specifically designed to provide and enhance this effect for a variety of practical applications by consideration of size, shape, and positioning of closely spaced conductors, and the intervening dielectric material. A capacitor was therefore historically first known as an electric CONDENSER. The physical form and construction of practical capacitors vary widely and many capacitor types are in common use. Most capacitors contain at least two electrical conductors often in the form of metallic plates or surfaces separated by a dielectric medium. A conductor may be a foil, thin film, sintered bead of metal, or an electrolyte
[...More...]

"Capacitor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Millimeter
The MILLIMETRE (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; SI unit symbol MM) or MILLIMETER (American spelling ) is a unit of length in the metric system , equal to one thousandth of a metre , which is the SI base unit
SI base unit
of length. Therefore there are thousand millimetres in a metre. There are ten millimetres in a centimetre. One millimetre is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 micrometres or 7006100000000000000♠1000000 nanometres . A millimetre is equal to exactly  5⁄127 (approximately 0.039370) of an inch . CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Unicode
Unicode
symbols * 3 Measurement * 4 See also * 5 References DEFINITIONSince 1983, the metre has been defined as "the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/7008299792458000000♠299792458 of a second "
[...More...]

"Millimeter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Taguchi Loss Function
THE TAGUCHI LOSS FUNCTION is graphical depiction of loss developed by the Japanese business statistician Genichi Taguchi to describe a phenomenon affecting the value of products produced by a company. Praised by Dr. W. Edwards Deming
W. Edwards Deming
(the business guru of the 1980s American quality movement), it made clear the concept that quality does not suddenly plummet when, for instance, a machinist exceeds a rigid blueprint tolerance. Instead 'loss' in value progressively increases as variation increases from the intended condition. This was considered a breakthrough in describing quality, and helped fuel the continuous improvement movement that since has become known as lean manufacturing
[...More...]

"Taguchi Loss Function" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Process Capability Index
In process improvement efforts, the PROCESS CAPABILITY INDEX or PROCESS CAPABILITY RATIO is a statistical measure of process capability : the ability of a process to produce output within specification limits. The concept of process capability only holds meaning for processes that are in a state of statistical control . Process capability indices measure how much "natural variation" a process experiences relative to its specification limits and allows different processes to be compared with respect to how well an organization controls them
[...More...]

"Process Capability Index" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sampling Plan
In statistics , quality assurance , and survey methodology , SAMPLING is concerned with the selection of a subset of individuals from within a statistical population to estimate characteristics of the whole population. Two advantages of sampling are that the cost is lower and data collection is faster than measuring the entire population. Each observation measures one or more properties (such as weight, location, color) of observable bodies distinguished as independent objects or individuals. In survey sampling , weights can be applied to the data to adjust for the sample design, particularly stratified sampling . Results from probability theory and statistical theory are employed to guide the practice. In business and medical research, sampling is widely used for gathering information about a population. Acceptance sampling is used to determine if a production lot of material meets the governing specifications
[...More...]

"Sampling Plan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dimension
In physics and mathematics , the DIMENSION of a mathematical space (or object) is informally defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify any point within it. Thus a line has a dimension of one because only one coordinate is needed to specify a point on it – for example, the point at 5 on a number line. A surface such as a plane or the surface of a cylinder or sphere has a dimension of two because two coordinates are needed to specify a point on it – for example, both a latitude and longitude are required to locate a point on the surface of a sphere. The inside of a cube , a cylinder or a sphere is three-dimensional because three coordinates are needed to locate a point within these spaces. In classical mechanics , space and time are different categories and refer to absolute space and time . That conception of the world is a four-dimensional space but not the one that was found necessary to describe electromagnetism
[...More...]

"Dimension" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inductor
An INDUCTOR, also called a COIL or REACTOR, is a passive two-terminal electrical component that stores electrical energy in a magnetic field when electric current is flowing through it. An inductor typically consists of an electric conductor, such as a wire, that is wound into a coil around a core. When the current flowing through an inductor changes, the time-varying magnetic field induces a voltage in the conductor, described by Faraday\'s law of induction . According to Lenz's law, the direction of induced electromotive force (e.m.f.) opposes the change in current that created it. As a result, inductors oppose any changes in current through them. An inductor is characterized by its inductance , which is the ratio of the voltage to the rate of change of current. In the International System of Units (SI), the unit of inductance is the henry (H). Inductors have values that typically range from 1 µH (10−6H) to 1 H
[...More...]

"Inductor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electronic Color Code
The ELECTRONIC COLOR CODE is used to indicate the values or ratings of electronic components, usually for resistors , but also for capacitors , inductors , diodes and others. A separate code, the 25-pair color code , is used to identify wires in some telecommunications cables. The electronic color code was developed in the early 1920s by the Radio Manufacturers Association (RMA), later the Radio Electronics Television Manufacturers\' Association (RETMA), now part of the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) Therefore, the code was known as RMA, RTMA, RETMA or EIA COLOR CODE. In 1952, it was standardized in IEC 62:1952 by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and since 1963 also published as EIA RS-279. Originally only meant to be used for fixed resistors, the color code was extended to also cover capacitors with IEC 62:1968
[...More...]

"Electronic Color Code" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo