HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Emperor Zhangzong Of Jin
Emperor Zhangzong of Jin (31 August 1168 – 29 December 1208), personal name Madage, sinicised name Wanyan Jing, was the sixth emperor of the Jurchen-led Jin dynasty, which ruled northern China between the 12th and 13th centuries. He reigned from 20 January 1189 to 29 December 1208.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Song invasion of the Jin2 Family 3 ReferencesLife[edit] Emperor Zhangzong was the sixth emperor of the Jin dynasty. He inherited the throne from his grandfather, Emperor Shizong[1] and was succeeded by Wanyan Yongji. To some extent, Emperor Zhangzong continued his grandfather's policy of encouraging intensive use of the Jurchen language
Jurchen language
and promotion of Jurchen customs. He forbade wearing of Han Chinese
Han Chinese
clothes and required his subjects to perform the Jurchen kowtow ceremony
[...More...]

"Emperor Zhangzong Of Jin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
[...More...]

"Tang Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
[...More...]

"Han Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Revanchism
Revanchism
Revanchism
(from French: revanche, "revenge") is the political manifestation of the will to reverse territorial losses incurred by a country, often following a war or social movement. As a term, revanchism originated in 1870s France
France
in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War
Franco-Prussian War
among nationalists who wanted to avenge the French defeat and reclaim the lost territories of Alsace-Lorraine.[1] Revanchism
Revanchism
draws its strength from patriotic and retributionist thought and is often motivated by economic or geo-political factors. Extreme revanchist ideologues often represent a hawkish stance, suggesting that their desired objectives can be achieved through the positive outcome of another war
[...More...]

"Revanchism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Han Tuozhou
Han Tuozhou (Wade–Giles: Han T'o-chou; 1152–1207) was a powerful Chinese statesman of the Southern Song dynasty, chancellor to Emperor Ningzong. He was responsible for Southern Song efforts to recover territories lost in northern China
China
to the Jurchen Jin dynasty in their 1142 peace settlement that ended the Jin–Song war. In his efforts to begin a military build-up, he had Yue Fei
Yue Fei
(who had resigned during peace talks with the Jurchen, after which he was jailed and poisoned) posthumously promoted and Qin Hui (who led the aforementioned peace talks with the Jurchen) demoted.[1] These efforts were unsuccessful, and the ensuing war was devastating to southern China, resulting in further territorial losses and terrible inflation
[...More...]

"Han Tuozhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chancellor (China)
The grand chancellor, also translated as counselor-in-chief, chancellor, chief councillor, chief minister, imperial chancellor, lieutenant chancellor and prime minister – was the highest-ranking executive official in the imperial Chinese government. The term was known by many different names throughout Chinese history, and the exact extent of the powers associated with the position fluctuated greatly, even during a particular dynasty.Contents1 History 2 List of chancellors of China2.1 List of chancellors of Shang dynasty 2.2 Zhou dynasty 2.3 List of chancellors of Qin dynasty
Qin

[...More...]

"Chancellor (China)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Southern Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

"Southern Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Beijing
Beijing
Beijing
(/beɪˈdʒɪŋ/;[9] Mandarin: [pèi.tɕíŋ] ( listen)), formerly romanized as Peking,[10] is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city
[...More...]

"Beijing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Taiye Lake
Taiye Lake
Taiye Lake
or Pond was an artificial lake in imperial City, Beijing during the Jin, Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties of China. The beauty[1] and utility[2] of the lake was responsible for the siting of Kublai Khan's palace and the position of modern Beijing. It continues to exist but it is now known separately as the "North", "Central", and "South Sea"s, the three interconnected lakes just west of the Forbidden City
Forbidden City
in downtown Beijing
[...More...]

"Taiye Lake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
[...More...]

"Confucianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

"Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jinshi (imperial Examination)
The Chinese imperial examinations were a civil service examination system in Imperial China to select candidates for the state bureaucracy. Although there were imperial exams as early as the Han dynasty, the system became widely utilized as the major path to office only in the mid-Tang dynasty, and remained so until its abolition in 1905 . Since the exams were based on knowledge of the classics and literary style, not technical expertise, successful candidates were generalists who shared a common language and culture, one shared even by those who failed. This common culture helped to unify the empire and the ideal of achievement by merit gave legitimacy to imperial rule, while leaving clear problems resulting from a systemic lack of technical and practical expertise. The examination helped to shape China's intellectual, cultural, political, shopping, arts and crafts, and religious life
[...More...]

"Jinshi (imperial Examination)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kowtow
Kowtow, which is borrowed from kau tau in Cantonese
Cantonese
(koutou in Mandarin Chinese), is the act of deep respect shown by prostration, that is, kneeling and bowing so low as to have one's head touching the ground. An alternative Chinese term is ketou; however, the meaning is somewhat altered: kou (叩) has the general meaning of knock, whereas ke (磕) has the general meaning of "touch upon (a surface)", tou (頭) meaning head. The date of this custom's origin is probably sometime between the Spring and Autumn Period, or the Warring States Period of China's history because it is already known to have been a custom by the time of the Qin Dynasty
Qin Dynasty
(221 BC - 206 BC).[citation needed] In East Asian culture, the kowtow is the highest sign of reverence. It was widely used to show reverence for one's elders, superiors, and especially the Emperor, as well as for religious and cultural objects of worship
[...More...]

"Kowtow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jurchen Language
Jurchen language
Jurchen language
(Chinese: 女真語; pinyin: Nǚzhēn Yǔ) is the Tungusic language
Tungusic language
of the Jurchen people
Jurchen people
of eastern Manchuria, the founders of the Jin Empire in northeastern China
China
of the 12th–13th centuries. It is ancestral to Manchu. In 1635 Hong Taiji
Hong Taiji
renamed the Jurchen people
Jurchen people
and Jurchen language
Jurchen language
as "Manchu".Contents1 Writing 2 Ming-dynasty Jurchen dictionaries 3 Jurchen words in Chinese texts 4 Writing Jurchen names in English 5 References 6 LiteratureWriting[edit] Main article: Jurchen scriptA silver pass with the Jurchen inscription gurun ni xada-xun, meaning "Trust of the Country".A writing system for Jurchen language
Jurchen language
was developed in 1119 by Wanyan Xiyin
[...More...]

"Jurchen Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.